Most People Mount a Strong Antibody Response to SARS-CoV-2 That Does Not Decline Rapidly

The vast majority of individuals infected with mild-to-moderate COVID 19 mount a robust antibody response that is relatively stable for at least five months, according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 28, in the journal Science.

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UNH Digs Deep Testing Wastewater for Early Warning Signs of COVID-19

The University of New Hampshire has gone underground to flush out cases of the coronavirus by testing wastewater on campus. The sewage sampling is being used as a secondary surveillance method to the already required twice a week individual nasal test to track and detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

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Nova Southeastern University Researchers Receive $4 Million From CDC for ‘COVID Long Haulers’ Study

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, health care providers are finding more and more patients are experiencing lingering symptoms after recovering from the virus. While the medical community is still working hard to address the virus itself and racing toward a vaccine, there is very little known or being done to address these residual health issues being experienced by those now called “COVID long haulers.” But all of that is about to change, thanks to research scientists at Nova Southeastern University (NSU.)

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Leaders in Education, Business and Government Join Forces to Solve Critical Issues Facing Young People at CFES Global Conference

COVID-19 and social unrest across the globe have changed our world forever. The CFES Brilliant Pathways Global Conferenceon October 27-29, will explore implication of this disruption and how we can ensure that our children succeed in education and the workplace in our new world.

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Do Asymptomatic Kids with COVID-19 Carry Less Virus?

New questions are at the forefront as a study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology from nine children’s hospitals finds that most asymptomatic children who tested positive for COVID-19 had relatively low levels of the virus compared to symptomatic children. The authors caution that the reason for this finding is unclear and more questions need to be answered. Were the asymptomatic children generally tested later in their disease, and were their viral loads potentially higher closer to the beginning of their infections? If tested early in disease, would asymptomatic children have viral loads as high as symptomatic children? Or do asymptomatic children typically not carry as much virus as children with symptoms? If so, how would lower viral loads impact the risk of transmission? These questions are essential to further clarify the public health impact of pediatric COVID-19.

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Nearly a Quarter of New York City Transit Workers Report Having Had COVID-19

A survey of New York City’s bus and subway workers finds that 24 percent report having contracted COVID-19 and 90 percent fear getting sick at work. The pilot study, conducted by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health, in coordination with the Transport Workers Union (TWU) Local 100, helps document the toll the pandemic has taken on the physical and mental health of essential workers.

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Mount Sinai Doctors Elected to National Academy of Medicine for Contributions to Emergency Medicine and Translational Genetics

Brendan G. Carr, MD, MA, MS, and Judy H. Cho, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM).

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Plant-Based Spray Could be Used in N95 Masks and Energy Devices

Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs. The method involves spraying methylcellulose, a renewable plastic material derived from plant cellulose, on 3D-printed and other objects ranging from electronics to plants, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Horizons.

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UCLA to lead statewide coalition to address COVID-19’s impact on communities at risk

A coalition of 11 academic institutions and their community partners across California has received a $4.1 million grant from the NIH for a statewide community-engaged approach to addressing COVID-19 among populations that have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

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Baylor Scott & White Health Enrolls First Patients in the World in Trial for Inhaled Remdesivir

Earlier this month, Baylor Scott & White Research Institute enrolled the first four patients in the world on Gilead’s new clinical trial involving an investigational inhaled solution of remdesivir (NCT04539262). This is Gilead’s first trial in COVID-19 patients examining the safety and efficacy of an inhaled solution of the drug in an outpatient setting. The study of an inhaled solution asks whether this mode of delivery can help reduce the amount of virus from the airways earlier.

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