Immune Molecules From a Llama Could Provide Protection Against a Vast Array of SARS-like Viruses Including COVID-19, Researchers Say

Mount Sinai-led researchers have shown that tiny, robust immune particles derived from the blood of a llama could provide strong protection against every COVID-19 variant, including Omicron, and 18 similar viruses.

Children’s Mental Health Visits to Emergency Departments Increased During COVID-19 Pandemic

In the Chicago area, pediatric mental health Emergency Department (ED) visits increased 27 percent at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, followed by a 4 percent increase monthly through February 2021, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago published in the journal Academic Pediatrics. The authors found increased ED visits for suicide, self-injury and disruptive behaviors, as well as higher admission rates for these children.

COVID-19 Vaccination in Pregnancy Helps Protect Infants from Needing Hospital Care for COVID-19

In a new study sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers provide additional evidence that COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy helps protect babies younger than 6 months from being hospitalized due to COVID-19. The risk of COVID-19 hospitalization among babies was reduced by about 80 percent during the Delta wave (July 1–December 18, 2021) and 40 percent during the Omicron wave (December 19–March 8, 2022).

Newer COVID-19 Subvariants Are Less Vulnerable to Immunity Induced by Vaccination and Previous Infection, Researchers Find

In a letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine, physician-scientists report that the three Omicron subvariants currently dominant in the United States – officially known as subvariants BA.2.12.1, BA.4, and BA.5 – substantially escape neutralizing antibodies induced by both vaccination and previous infection.

Massive dataset reveals which governments have best responded to COVID-19 pandemic

How well did our political institutions manage the COVID-19 pandemic and are they prepared to handle future threats to the public? A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York hopes to answer these questions and more after compiling an extensive dataset tracking public health government responses to COVID-19 at all levels of government throughout the world.

Child Abuse Evaluations in Emergency Departments Drop During Pandemic, But Reason Unclear

Pediatric Emergency Department (ED) encounters related to physical abuse decreased by 19 percent during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a multicenter study published in the journal Pediatrics. While encounter rates with lower clinical severity dropped during the pandemic, encounter rates with higher clinical severity remained unchanged. This pattern raises concern for unrecognized harm, as opposed to true reductions in child abuse.

Donations from Professional Baseball Healthcare Providers Support 80+ Nurses on Path to CCRN, PCCN Certification

More than 80 progressive care and critical care nurses have been awarded scholarships to support their pursuit of CCRN or PCCN specialty nursing certification, thanks to donations to the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses from two groups of professional baseball healthcare providers.

Most COVID-19 long-haulers continue to experience neurologic symptoms, fatigue, and compromised quality of life 15 months after initial infection

A new study published in Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology looked at the evolution of neurologic symptoms in non-hospitalized COVID-19 long-haulers at the Northwestern Medicine Neuro COVID-19 Clinic and discovered most long-haulers continue to experience symptoms such as brain fog, numbness/tingling, headache, dizziness, blurred vision, tinnitus and fatigue on average of 15 months after disease onset.

The US reaches 1 Million Deaths from COVID-19: GW Experts Available to Comment

The United States has reached 1 million reported deaths from COVID-19 and that number is likely an undercount, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The George Washington University has a number of experts to comment on the…

AACN Critical Care Conference Brings Together Thousands of Nurses for Education, Inspiration

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) brings together thousands of progressive and critical care nurses and other healthcare professionals who care for acutely and critically ill patients and their families during its National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition (NTI, #NTI2022), with the theme “Rooted in Strength.”

Delays in surgery for advanced esophageal cancer result in significantly worse survival than early surgery

Delays in surgery for esophageal cancer did not appear to have much impact on patients’ relative survival for early-stage cancer compared with patients who had surgery early, but they did reduce the relative survival rate by almost half for patients with more advanced disease.

New study finds persistent viral shedding of COVID-19 is associated with delirium and six-month mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients

The Northwestern Medicine Neuro COVID-19 research team discovered patients who continued to test positive more than 14 days after their initial positive test were more likely to experience delirium, longer hospital stays, were less likely to be discharged home, and had a greater six-month mortality than those without persistent viral shedding of COVID-19.

Severe Heart Attack Mortality Dropped in Second Year of COVID-19 Pandemic, But Still High in Unvaccinated, New Data Shows

A newly published analysis in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology of hospitalized patients with both a severe type of heart attack called STEMI (ST-elevation myocardial infarction) and coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) infection compares clinical outcomes for these patients during the first and second years of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Lungs in a Box” Now Offered at Northwestern Medicine

Due to COVID-19 and a rapidly expanding list of conditions for which lung transplantation can be lifesaving, the need for new organs is growing. However, there’s a global shortage of donated lungs, which results in numerous deaths among patients on the waitlist. To help expand the donor pool, Northwestern Medicine is now using a device from XVIVO called XPS™ which is used for ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) – nicknamed “lungs in a box” – to rescue potentially viable lungs and those initially deemed “unacceptable” for transplant. Out of all solid organs, lungs have the lowest utilization, with only one in five donated lungs getting transplanted.

Genome sequencing reveals widespread COVID-19 infection in white-tailed deer

Houston Methodist’s SARS-CoV-2 genome sequencing team has partnered on a study led by Penn State that revealed 80% of white-tailed deer sampled across Iowa at the height of the 2020-2021 deer-hunting season tested positive for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Analysis of the virus genome sequences revealed infections were likely the result of multiple human-to-deer transmission “spillover” events followed by deer-to-deer transmission from April 2020 through January 2021.

Rutgers Chancellor Available to Discuss COVID-19 Booster Shots, Why Frontline Workers Need Them

Brian L. Strom, chancellor at the Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences and executive vice president for Rutgers Health Affairs, is available to discuss the COVID-19 booster shot and why frontline workers need to get them. Strom agrees with the Centers…

From Alpha to Epsilon: Consortium study illuminates surfaces of Spike most resistant to antibody escape

Scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have published a detailed map of where human antibodies bind to SARS-CoV-2, a map that was generated by a global collaboration comparing nearly all leading clinical candidates. The new research will guide the development of more effective COVID-19 antibody therapies and help scientists develop effective vaccines to address emerging viral variants.

Previously Healthy Young Adults with ‘Long COVID’ Show Vascular Dysfunction in Limbs, but Not Brain

A first-of-its-kind study of young adults with positive COVID-19 tests from more than 4 weeks ago found that those who were still symptomatic (i.e., long-haulers) had impaired blood vessel function in their limbs, but not brains. Asymptotic participants had blood vessel function similar to controls.

New UNLV Program Training Next Generation of Occupational Therapists

UNLV’s new intensive and innovative three-year doctoral program in occupational therapy, housed in the School of Integrated Health Sciences, is training students to meet the needs of Nevada patients — from babies in the NICU to those recovering from accidents and strokes — reclaim their lives.

Cancer Guidelines Organization Supports Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccination for Health Workers

National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) COVID-19 Vaccination Advisory Committee calls for healthcare workforce vaccine requirements to assure healthcare community is doing all it can to prevent exposure to COVID-19.

Study shows neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 remain relatively high for up to 13 months following infection

  New York, NY – Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have found that most COVID-19 patients have persistent antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 virus at levels that are correlated with neutralization of the virus more than…

New Study Examines Privacy and Security Perceptions of Online Education Proctoring Services

Educational institutions have had to transition to remote learning and exam taking. This has led to an increase in the use of online proctoring services to curb student cheating. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers explored the security and privacy perceptions of students taking proctored exams.

American Society of Anesthesiologists and Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation Say Preoperative Testing for COVID-19 is Essential, Regardless of Vaccination

All patients undergoing non-emergency surgeries or procedures should continue to have preoperative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for SARS-CoV-2, irrespective of vaccination status, according to an updated guidance from the American Society of Anesthesiologists and Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation.

Don’t Let the Raging Virus Put Life in Jeopardy. Chula Recommends How to Build an Immunity for Your Heart Against Stress and Depression

Cumulative stress, denial, and chronic depression are the byproducts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Center for Psychological Wellness, Chulalongkorn University recommends ways to cope by harnessing positive energy from our heart.

Appropriate Technologies: The COVID-19-Era Heroes Yet to Come to “Center Stage”

The COVID-19 outbreaks in Thailand have seen an ever-increasing number of infections as new clusters are emerging. The faculty members of Sasin School of Management — Prof. Dr. Kua Wongboonsin, Asst. Prof. Dr. Piyachart Phiromswad, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Pattanaporn Chatjuthamard, Asst. Prof. Dr. Pattarake Sarajoti, and Asst. Prof. Dr. Sabin Srivannaboon, with financial support from the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT), jointly present ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19 sustainably in a study to identify technologies that can instantly and appropriately help professionals who find social distancing difficult.

2 in 1 Face Mask Against Dust and Virus – Chula Health Innovation in the New Normal

Chula’s Faculty of Engineering joins hands with PTT to develop a 2 in1 face mask, an innovation that protects against PM2.5 dust particles and COVID-19 virus that can be reused more than 15 times, helps reduce waste, is pollution-free, and will be available for sale soon.

COVID-19 shapes future of accessibility services at WVU

WVU’s Office of Accessibility Services saw a 900% increase in requests from deaf or hard of hearing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Enlisting students on work study programs to do lecture transcriptions and closed captioning helped the University save nearly a quarter of a million dollars.

WVU professor: Personal desire, not shaming, should serve as motivator to arise from the unhealthy pits of COVID

George Kelley, a professor in West Virginia University’s School of Public Health, said he believes the key now is to push forward from the pandemic and into healthier lifestyles.

Butterfly Effect Can Double Travel of Virus-Laden Droplets

In Physics of Fluids, investigators from the University of Florida and Lebanese American University carried out detailed computer simulations to test a mathematical theory they developed previously. They found nearly identical exhalations could spread in different directions when miniscule initial variations are substantially amplified by turbulence. This is the so-called butterfly effect.