2 in 1 Face Mask Against Dust and Virus – Chula Health Innovation in the New Normal

Chula’s Faculty of Engineering joins hands with PTT to develop a 2 in1 face mask, an innovation that protects against PM2.5 dust particles and COVID-19 virus that can be reused more than 15 times, helps reduce waste, is pollution-free, and will be available for sale soon.

COVID-19 shapes future of accessibility services at WVU

WVU’s Office of Accessibility Services saw a 900% increase in requests from deaf or hard of hearing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Enlisting students on work study programs to do lecture transcriptions and closed captioning helped the University save nearly a quarter of a million dollars.

WVU professor: Personal desire, not shaming, should serve as motivator to arise from the unhealthy pits of COVID

George Kelley, a professor in West Virginia University’s School of Public Health, said he believes the key now is to push forward from the pandemic and into healthier lifestyles.

Butterfly Effect Can Double Travel of Virus-Laden Droplets

In Physics of Fluids, investigators from the University of Florida and Lebanese American University carried out detailed computer simulations to test a mathematical theory they developed previously. They found nearly identical exhalations could spread in different directions when miniscule initial variations are substantially amplified by turbulence. This is the so-called butterfly effect.

Covid-19 vaccines also protect unvaccinated family members

Researchers at the Helsinki Graduate School of Economics have found that the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines protect both vaccinated individuals and their unvaccinated adult household members against SARS-CoV-2 infections. The study, not yet peer-reviewed, used Finnish administrative datasets to examine the link between mRNA-based Covid-19 vaccines and infection risk among vaccinated individuals as well as their unvaccinated family members.

Dip your toe – or dive right in: WVU psychologists spill advice on reentering the world post-COVID

A high percentage of the population may experience “re-entry anxiety” as more people get vaccinated, guidelines are loosened and the masks come off, according to WVU psychologists.

Nearly Half of COVID-19 Patients Left Hospital in Worse Physical Condition

Much of the conversation around COVID-19 focuses on death and survival. But 45% of patients hospitalized for the virus at Michigan Medicine during the pandemic’s first wave experienced significant functional decline. Nearly 20% were discharged to a location other than their home. Researchers say this information highlights the true impact of COVID-19.

Nearly 3% of Americans take immune-weakening drugs that may limit COVID vaccine response

A study of more than 3 million insured U.S. adult patients under 65 found that nearly 3% take immunosuppressive drugs that may elevate risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms and hospitalization if they became infected. There is growing evidence that immunosuppressive drugs may also reduce the COVID vaccine’s efficacy.

Analysis Suggesting Measles, Polio and Tuberculosis Vaccines May Boost Immunity to Coronavirus

Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Maryland scientists, who are also members of the Global Virus Network (GVN), a coalition comprised of human and animal virologists from 63 Centers of Excellence and 11 Affiliates in 35 countries, and colleagues today published a perspective proposing that live attenuated vaccines (LAVs), such as those for tuberculosis, measles, and polio, may induce protective innate immunity that mitigate other infectious diseases, triggering the human body’s natural emergency response to infections including COVID-19 as well as future pandemic threats.

Meeting Preview: Hot Topics at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE

Reporters and bloggers are invited to join top nutrition researchers and practitioners for a dynamic virtual program at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. The flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition runs June 7–10, 2021 and features research announcements, expert discussions and more.

University of Miami Researchers Report COVID-19 Found in Penile Tissue Could Contribute to ED

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers report the widespread blood vessel dysfunction, or endothelial dysfunction, that results from the COVID-19 infection could contribute to erectile dysfunction, or ED, according to a study published in the World Journal of Men’s Health .

2021 Warren Alpert Prize Awarded to Two Scientists for RNA Discoveries

The 2021 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize has been awarded to scientists Lynne Maquat and Joan Steitz for seminal discoveries in the biology and function of RNA, the workhorse molecule of cells. Their discoveries have reshaped the understanding of RNA’s myriad roles in healthy cell function and in disease-causing dysfunction and have informed the conceptualization and design of RNA-based therapies in various stages of development.

Rutgers Engineers Developing Rapid Breathalyzer Test for COVID-19

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 30, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick engineering professors Edward P. DeMauro, German Drazer, Hao Lin and Mehdi Javanmard are available for interviews on their work to develop a new type of fast-acting COVID-19 sensor that detects the presence…

Chula to Accelerate Research on “Rutin” — An Herbal Extract Against COVID-19

Chula researchers have found that “rutin” extract from orange peel can kill the COVID-19 virus. They are developing it into drugs while pointing out that drug research is still necessary along with vaccine research and suggesting that Thai people should adjust their views on herbs to create added value.

Experimental Biology 2021 Press Materials Available Now

Embargoed press materials are now available for the virtual Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting, featuring cutting-edge multidisciplinary research from across the life sciences. EB 2021, to be held April 27–30, is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together thousands of scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community.

Announcing Virtual Press Conference for Experimental Biology 2021 Meeting

Reporters are invited to join a live Q&A discussion of exciting research announcements at the forefront of the life sciences during a virtual press conference for the Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting. The press conference will be held online from 1–1:45 p.m. EDT on Monday, April 26, 2021 (RSVP by Friday, April 23).

UGA to establish national NIH-funded center to fight flu

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the University of Georgia a contract to establish the Center for Influenza Disease and Emergence Research (CIDER). The contract will provide $1 million in first-year funding and is expected to be supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, for seven years and up to approximately $92 million.

Baylor Scott & White Sports Therapy & Research Publishes New Data on Impacts of Mask Wearing on Sports Performance

Baylor Scott & White Sports Therapy & Research at The Star in Frisco has published new findings from a study designed to determine the effects of wearing a cloth mask on sports performance. The data from this randomized controlled trial, conducted through Baylor Scott & White Research Institute, has been published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine and shows that participants who wore cloth masks during exercise experienced a reduction in performance as intensity levels increased.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss How Exercise Behaviors Changed During COVID-19 Pandemic

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 14, 2021) – Rutgers expert Brandon L. Alderman, who focuses on the science of exercise and its impact on mental health and cognitive function, is available for interviews on how exercise behaviors have changed during the…

Houston Methodist study reveals COVID-19 UK variant cases doubling weekly in Houston

Houston Methodist infectious disease pathologists have discovered new COVID-19 cases caused by the SARS-CoV-2 UK B.1.1.7 variant are doubling weekly. By mid-March the number increased sharply to 648 cases from 305 just a week earlier. The findings come from the latest batch of 8,857 virus genomes sequenced from patients with positive COVID-19 tests in the first two months of 2021, representing 94% of Houston Methodist cases.

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Announces Recipients of 2021 Circle of Excellence Awards

The 18 nurses who receive the Circle of Excellence award from AACN this year demonstrate an exceptional commitment to achieving excellent outcomes in the care of acutely and critically ill patients and their families, with solution-oriented approaches to challenges, including the COVID-19 pandemic.

Making the pieces fit: How WVU, Marshall and the state of West Virginia detect new COVID-19 variants

Picture viral RNA as a single component that you can break into one million pieces. Now imagine reassembling those pieces together, literally like a jigsaw puzzle. If there’s a chipped corner or if a piece won’t fit snugly as it should, consider that a virus mutation or variant. That’s genomic sequencing, in a nutshell, when it comes to identifying variants of COVID-19, according to Peter Stoilov, associate professor of biochemistry at the West Virginia University School of Medicine.

Flu shot associated with fewer, less severe COVID cases

People who received a flu shot last flu season were significantly less likely to test positive for a COVID-19 infection when the pandemic hit, according to a new study. And those who did test positive for COVID-19 had fewer complications if they received their flu shot.

Hormone Drugs May Disarm COVID-19 Spike Protein and Stop Disease Progression

Hormone drugs that reduce androgen levels may help disarm the coronavirus spike protein used to infect cells and stop the progression of severe COVID-19 disease, suggests a new preclinical study from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania and published online in Cell Press’s iScience.

During pandemic, potentially avoidable hospitalizations for non-COVID conditions fell more among whites

New research suggests that the COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated existing racial health care disparities and that during the pandemic, African Americans may have had worse access than whites to outpatient care that could have helped prevent deterioration of their non–COVID-19 health conditions