Modeling COVID-19 Data Must Be Done With Extreme Care

As the virus causing COVID-19 began its devastating spread, an international team of scientists was alarmed by the lack of uniform approaches by various countries’ epidemiologists. Data modeling to predict the numbers of likely infections varied widely and revealed a high degree of uncertainty. In the journal Chaos, the group describes why modeling and extrapolating the evolution of COVID-19 outbreaks in near real time is an enormous scientific challenge that requires a deep understanding of the nonlinearities underlying the dynamics of epidemics.

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Mount Sinai Study Finds First Cases of COVID-19 in New York City are Primarily from European and US Sources

First definitive molecular epidemiology study of SARS-CoV-2 in New York City to describe the route by which the virus arrived

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Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss How to Help Free Market Fight Coronavirus

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Physicists test coronavirus particles against temperature, humidity

One of the biggest unknowns about coronavirus is how changing seasons will affect its spread. Physicists from the University of Utah have received a NSF grant to create individual coronavirus particles without a genome. They’ll test how the structure of the coronavirus withstands changes in humidity and temperature.

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Public health, nursing expert: Coronavirus: Health care workers must protect themselves even if employers won’t

Faculty Q&AAs the coronavirus spreads throughout the country, an increasing number of American health care workers helping to treat patients are contracting the infection.Christopher Friese.Christopher Friese, the Elizabeth Tone Hosmer Professor of Nursing at the School of Nursing and professor of health management and policy at the School of Public Health, leads a research team focused on health care delivery in high-risk settings.

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When coronavirus is not alone

Interacting contagious diseases like influenza and pneumonia—and perhaps coronavirus too—follow the same complex spreading patterns as social trends, like the adoption of new slang or technologies. This new finding, published in Nature Physics, could lead to better tracking and intervention when multiple diseases spread through a population at the same time.

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