Humid Air Can Extend Lifetime of Virus-Laden Aerosol Droplets

The novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread through natural respiratory activities, but little is known about how the virus is transported through the air. Scientists report in Physics of Fluids on a study of how airflow and fluid flow affect exhaled droplets that can contain the virus. Their model includes a more accurate description of air turbulence that affects an exhaled droplet’s trajectory. Calculations with their model reveal, among other things, an important and surprising effect of humid air.

Rutgers Expert Can Discuss Heat Wave and Hot Summer in N.J.

New Brunswick, N.J. (July 20, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick climatologist David A. Robinson is available for interviews on the ongoing heat wave in New Jersey and the hot summer weather to date. The worst of the heat wave is expected today,…

Physicists test coronavirus particles against temperature, humidity

One of the biggest unknowns about coronavirus is how changing seasons will affect its spread. Physicists from the University of Utah have received a NSF grant to create individual coronavirus particles without a genome. They’ll test how the structure of the coronavirus withstands changes in humidity and temperature.

Heat Stress May Affect More Than 1.2 Billion People Annually by 2100

Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a Rutgers study. That’s more than four times the number of people affected today, and more than 12 times the number who would have been affected without industrial era global warming.

Which Climates Are Best for Passive Cooling Technologies?

If you guessed locations with drier atmospheres and frequent clear skies, you’re right. WASHINGTON, D.C., June 25, 2019 — A group of University of California­, San Diego researchers set out to gain a better understanding of the thermal balance of…