Study reveals racial disparities in Huntington’s disease diagnoses

New research led by UCLA Health revealed that Black patients with Huntington’s disease in the U.S. and Canada received their diagnoses, on average, one year later compared to White patients after symptoms first appear.

Researchers From UNH and Northeastern Dig into History to Uncover a “King”

Archaeologists at the University of New Hampshire along with a historian at Northeastern University believe they have unearthed the long-lost homestead of King Pompey, an enslaved African who won his freedom and later became one of the first Black property owners in colonial New England.

Study Suggests Racial Discrimination During Midlife Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology Later in Life

Racial discrimination experienced during midlife is associated with Alzheimer’s disease pathology, according to a new study from researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and the University of Georgia. The findings appear online today in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

Corewell Health neuroscientist leads research to tackle disparate growth of Alzheimer’s among Black Americans

To address the growing disparity and identify multi-level risk factors impacting the higher prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease among middle-aged and older Black adults, Corewell Health neuroscientist Stewart Graham, Ph.D., in collaboration with researchers from Hampton University, Johns Hopkins and Clemson are spearheading a first-of-its-kind, five-year, $4.8 million research project.

How love, health, and neighborhood intersect for Black Americans

Romantic relationships and neighborhood quality are both important predictors of mental and emotional wellbeing. But the larger societal context also influences how these factors affect individuals. A new study from the University of Illinois looks at the intersection of relationships, neighborhood, and mental health for Black Americans.

Alarming Rising Trends in Suicide by Firearms in Young Americans

Researchers explored suicide trends by firearms in white and black Americans ages 5 to 24 years from 1999 to 2018. From 2008 to 2018, rates of suicide by firearms quadrupled in those ages 5 to 14 years and increased by 50 percent in those ages 15 to 24 years. Suicide deaths by firearms were more prevalent in white than black Americans – a marked contrast with homicide by firearms, which are far more prevalent in black than white Americans.

Most U.S. Schools Teaching Black History, But Few Doing It Well

As the United States marks Black History Month this year, more K-12 schools in the United States are teaching Black history than ever before. However, ongoing analysis from Johns Hopkins University finds these efforts often fail, because coursework emphasizes the negative aspects of African American life while omitting important contributions made by families of color in literature, politics, theology, art, and medicine.

New Study Finds Once Hospitalized, Black Patients with COVID-19 Have Lower Risk of Death than White Patients

A team of investigators at NYU Langone Health has found that once hospitalized, Black patients (after controlling for other serious health conditions and neighborhood income) were less likely to have severe illness, die, or be discharged to hospice compared to White patients.

Survey collection reveals over 80 years of public opinion on race

The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Cornell University has launched “Say Their Names. Hear Their Voices,” a publicly available collection of more than 80 years of public opinion surveys of Black Americans and U.S. attitudes about Black America, presented with context about race in polling over the years

United States should implement nationwide truth commission on police violence against Black people

The United States needs to implement a nationwide truth commission on police violence against Black people, according to Kerry Whigham, assistant professor of genocide and mass atrocity prevention at Binghamton University, State University of New York. “If recent instances of…

Medicaid expansion meant better health for the most vulnerable low-income adults, study finds

The most vulnerable residents of Michigan say their health improved significantly after they enrolled in the state’s expanded Medicaid program, a new study finds. Those with extremely low incomes or multiple chronic health problems, and those who are Black, got the biggest health boosts. But participants of all backgrounds reported improvements.

Black Individuals at Higher Risk for Contracting COVID-19, According to New Research

Results of an analysis published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found that Black individuals were twice as likely as White individuals to test positive for COVID-19. The average age of all participants in the study was 46. However, those infected were on average 52 years old, compared to those who tested negative, who were 45 years old on average.

Study: News Reports of Education “Achievement Gaps” May Perpetuate Stereotypes of Black Americans

Scholars have warned that the framing of racial “achievement gaps” in tests scores, grades, and other education outcomes may perpetuate racial stereotypes and encourage people to explain the gaps as the failure of students and their families rather than as resulting from structural racism. A new study finds that TV news reporting about racial achievement gaps led viewers to report exaggerated stereotypes of Black Americans as lacking education and may have increased implicit stereotyping of Black students as less competent than White students.

Civil rights scholar: “I fear for my Black son every day”

In the wake of the murder of George Floyd, whose last words were “Momma, I’m through,” civil rights scholar and Binghamton University Professof of History Anne C. Bailey discusses the constant fear that Black mothers hold for their sons.  “As…