Llama ‘nanobodies’ could hold key to preventing deadly post-transplant infection

Scientists have developed a ‘nanobody’ – a small fragment of a llama antibody – that is capable of chasing out human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) as it hides away from the immune system. This then enables immune cells to seek out and…

Interaction identified between SARS-CoV-2 and unusual RNA structures in human cells

Replication of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, depends on a series of interactions between viral proteins and different cellular partners such as nucleic acids (DNA or RNA). Characterizing these interactions is crucial to elucidate the process of viral replication…

Toward one drug to treat all coronaviruses

Safe and effective vaccines offer hope for an end to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the possible emergence of vaccine-resistant SARS-CoV-2 variants, as well as novel coronaviruses, make finding treatments that work against all coronaviruses as important as ever. Now, researchers…

Measures and clinical approach of COVID 19

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has spread throughout the globe and much time has passed since it was declared as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO). COVID-19: Diagnosis and Management provides clinicians and scholars all the information…

Present and future application of artificial intelligence in clinical drug

The combination of expert knowledge and multidisciplinary approaches highlighted in the book make it a valuable source of information for physicians and clinical researchers active in the field of cancer diagnosis and treatment (oncologists, oncologic surgeons, radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine…

Neonatal meningitis: the immaturity of microbiota and epithelial barriers implicated

Meningitis is associated with high mortality and frequently causes severe sequelae. Newborn infants are particularly susceptible to this type of infection; they develop meningitis 30 times more often than the general population. Group B streptococcus (GBS) bacteria are the most…

Cutting out the proteins that give SARS-CoV-2 its power

Researchers at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) have narrowed down the proteins enabling SARS-CoV-2 to cause disease. Using advanced genetic engineering techniques developed at Texas Biomed, they systematically deleted the genetic code for five of the virus’s accessory proteins, one at a time, to see how each one affected the virus’s ability to spread and cause illness. The research was published online this month in the Journal of Virology.

Had COVID-19? One vaccine dose enough; boosters for all, study says

Two mRNA vaccines against COVID-19 have proven safe and effective in clinical trials, as well as in the millions of people who have been vaccinated so far. But how prior SARS-CoV-2 infection affects vaccine response, and how long that response…