Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Identify Approach for Potential Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae Vaccine

Scientists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified two proteins that could be used for a potential vaccine against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Working in a mouse model, the investigators found that administering two bacterial adhesive proteins that play a key role in helping the bacteria to latch on to respiratory cells and initiate respiratory tract infection stimulated protective immunity against diverse NTHi strains, highlighting the vaccine potential.

Dengue immune function discovery could benefit much-needed vaccine development

The discovery of new possible biomarkers to predict clinical and immune responses to dengue virus infection could be critical to informing future vaccines for the mosquito-borne virus, which saw a record number of over 400 million cases in 2019.

George Washington University Public Health/Medical Experts Available for Media Interviews on COVID-19 Vaccine

On Dec. 17, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel is expected to review the data on the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, paving the way for approval. Researchers at the George Washington University led one of the 100 clinical sites testing…

GenScript Granted Authorization for cPass™ SARS-CoV-2 Neutralization Antibody Detection Test in Brazil

GenScript USA Inc., the world’s leading research reagent provider, announced today that Brazil’s National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) (Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária) has authorized the use of the cPass™ SARS-CoV-2 Neutralization Antibody Detection Kit for detecting neutralizing antibodies. The cPass test is the first and only ANVISA authorized test for detecting neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. Neutralizing antibodies specifically block the ability of a virus to infect a cell and are well-recognized to confer immunity.

Rutgers Infectious Disease Expert Available to Discuss Moderna’s Coronavirus Vaccine

Rutgers’ principal investigator for the Moderna phase 3 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School is available to discuss the drugmaker’s vaccine, which the company has announced is 94.5 percent effective. Moderna intends to seek an emergency…

New intranasal vaccine platform provides potential for more effective vaccines with fewer side effects

A new study at the University of Chicago and Duke University finds that a new type of intranasal vaccine induces a strong immune response in lungs, with possible implications for COVID-19. The system uses nanofibers tagged with antigens to prime the immune system against a potential invasion.

Soup to Nuts

The COVID-19 pandemic demands action on many fronts, from prevention to testing to treatment. Not content to focus its research efforts on just one, the laboratory of George Church in the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University is tackling the problem from seven different angles.

A Coronavirus Vaccine Is in the Works But Won’t Just Emerge Overnight

Supriya Munshaw, a senior lecturer at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, offers insights on the likely time frame for a coronavirus vaccine, the steps involved in developing one, the most promising candidates currently in the labs of biotech companies, and why, years after the MERS and SARS outbreaks, a coronavirus vaccine still has not been produced.

University of Kentucky Researchers Unite to Fight COVID-19

Researchers and faculty from multiple disciplines across the University of Kentucky are coming together as part of the global effort to treat, understand and eradicate COVID-19. A new workgroup within UK’s College of Medicine is bringing together experts from across the campus to focus on advising COVID-19 patient care and clinical trials based on emerging research and potential treatment options.

Tulane University launches new coronavirus research program to develop a vaccine and advanced diagnostics

From working to develop one of the first nonhuman primate models for the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) to designing new nanotechnology-based tests to rapidly diagnose infections, researchers at Tulane University are responding across disciplines to the emerging coronavirus epidemic.