Lifestyle Improvement Program Found to Increase Physical Activity

Researchers at the Rush Institute of Healthy Aging have found that D-CLIP, a lifestyle education program to prevent diabetes in South Asians with prediabetes increased physical activity by nearly an hour a week.

Read more

Head and Neck Injuries Make Up Nearly 28% of All Electric Scooter Accident Injuries

 DETROIT (October 12, 2020) – A Henry Ford Health System physician is sounding the alarm on the rising number of injuries caused from riding electric scooters, calling it a growing public health concern.In a study of e-scooter injuries, Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D., chair of the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, says a review of emergency visits in the last three years shows e-scooter injuries have increased significantly with many of them related to head and neck injuries.

Read more

Clinical trial to assess rehabilitation treatment for infants and toddlers after stroke

In the first of its kind for the tiniest stroke survivors, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) will lead a stroke rehabilitation clinical trial in the state of Texas through a multi-institutional NIH StrokeNet initiative.

Read more

University of Kentucky Researchers Awarded NSF Grant to Engineer Better Mental Health Solutions

From the limited data currently available, Wilson, Hammer and Usher found that engineering students aren’t necessarily more likely to have a mental health concern, but they are significantly less likely to seek help than non-engineering college students. This treatment gap became the basis for their National Science Foundation (NSF) grant proposal titled, “Development of a Survey Instrument to Identify Mental Health Related Help-Seeking Beliefs in Engineering Students.”

Read more

Follow-Up Appointments for Children Hospitalized for Bronchiolitis May Not Be Needed; New Study Findings Could Guide Treatment During COVID Pandemic

A new study at Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City has found that follow-up appointments for hospitalized children treated for childhood bronchitis are often not necessary, and that switching from mandatory to “as-needed” follow-up care can save families from unnecessary medical care and expense – and may help guide treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read more

New Study Suggests U.S. COVID-19 Cases Could Have Been 35 Times Higher Without These Measures

The authors found the closing of entertainment businesses — such as restaurants, movie theaters and gyms — and shelter-in-place orders — such as Gov. Andy Beshear’s “Healthy at Home” initiative — resulted in a dramatic reduction in COVID-19 cases.

Read more

Mount Sinai Study Finds First Cases of COVID-19 in New York City are Primarily from European and US Sources

First definitive molecular epidemiology study of SARS-CoV-2 in New York City to describe the route by which the virus arrived

Read more

Global Team Enables Child With a Fatal Genetic Disease to Recover

A young boy with a rare genetic disease that typically kills within weeks of birth is now 3 years old and in remission thanks to a collaborative effort that included physicians at King Saud University Department of Pediatrics and immunologists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Read more

Researchers Identify Potential Formula for Blood Cancer Vaccine

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a way to move precision immunotherapy forward by using genomics to inform immunotherapy for multiple myeloma, a blood cancer, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, in December.

Read more

Intermittent Fasting Increases Longevity in Cardiac Catheterization Patients

In a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have found that cardiac catheterization patients who practiced regular intermittent fasting lived longer than patients who don’t.

Read more

New Research Could Change Clinical Practice for Cases of Unmanaged Heartburn

A study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine found that in patients seen for heartburn unresponsive to treatment with Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs), an extensive, systematic workup revealed truly PPI-refractory and reflux-related heartburn in only a minority of cases. In other words, most patients with heartburn unrelieved by PPIs did not have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causing the symptom. Furthermore, for the selected subgroup identified as having reflux-related, PPI-refractory heartburn, surgery that corrects reflux was significantly superior (67% success rate) to continued medical therapy (28% success rate).

Read more