National Academy of Medicine elects UCI biomedical engineer Kyriacos A. Athanasiou

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 22, 2020 — University of California, Irvine biomedical engineer Kyriacos A. Athanasiou has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest distinctions awarded to professionals in the medical sciences, healthcare and public health. He is one of 90 new U.S.-based members announced this week, along with 10 new international members.

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FAU Awarded U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant to Improve Learning and Operation of AI Systems

Researchers will develop new theory and methods to curate training data sets for artificial intelligence (AI) learning and screen real-time operational data for AI field deployment. They will develop technology to identify faulty, unusual and irregular information for AI learning and operations that rely on data, and will provide critical alerts to troubleshoot a problem before it occurs. This data-quality evaluation technology is being developed for a number of industries ranging from the military to cybersecurity to medical diagnostics.

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UCI materials scientists discover design secrets of nearly indestructible insect

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 21, 2020 – With one of the more awe-inspiring names in the animal kingdom, the diabolical ironclad beetle is one formidable insect. Birds, lizards and rodents frequently try to make a meal of it but seldom succeed. Run over it with a car, and the critter lives on. The beetle’s survival depends on two key factors: its ability to convincingly play dead and an exoskeleton that’s one of the toughest, most crush-resistant structures known to exist in the biological world.

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$3M Department of Defense award to support UIC STEM research program

A multidisciplinary research team from the University of Illinois Chicago has been awarded a $3 million, three-year U.S. Department of Defense award to establish an undergraduate research mentoring program in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, areas with a focus on engaging undergraduate student veterans and minority students.

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Plant-Based Spray Could be Used in N95 Masks and Energy Devices

Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs. The method involves spraying methylcellulose, a renewable plastic material derived from plant cellulose, on 3D-printed and other objects ranging from electronics to plants, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Horizons.

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Computational Biologist Thomas Norman of Sloan Kettering Institute Honored with Distinguished NIH Director’s New Innovator Award

Computational biologist Thomas Norman, PhD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s (MSK) Sloan Kettering Institute (SKI) has been named one of 53 recipients of the prestigious 2020 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s New Innovator Award. As part of the award, Dr. Norman will receive $1.5 million in direct costs upfront in the first year of a five-year award.

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FAU Receives $5.3 Million NIH Grant to Detect Cognitive Change in Older Drivers

Testing a readily and rapidly available, discreet in-vehicle sensing system could provide the first step toward future widespread, low-cost early warnings of cognitive change in older drivers. The use of an advanced, multimodal approach involves the development of novel driving sensors and integration of data from a battery of cognitive function tests, eye tracking and driving behaviors and factors. These in-vehicle technologies could help detect abnormal driving behavior that may be attributed to cognitive impairment.

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