For Valentine’s Day, Think of Your – and Your Partner’s – Heart Health

CLEVELAND: As Valentine’s Day approaches, a Cleveland Clinic survey finds that two-thirds of Americans (66%) in a committed relationship are concerned with their partner’s heart health. Moreover, 60% of Americans say they are more motivated to live a heart healthy lifestyle for their partners than for themselves. This is especially true for men – 67% compared to 52% for women.

The survey was conducted as part of Cleveland Clinic Heart, Vascular and Thoracic Institute’s “Love your Heart” consumer education campaign in celebration of American Heart Month. It looked at how relationships affect heart health.

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Diabetes can independently lead to heart failure, population study shows

Heart problems are a common development for people with diabetes. In fact, about 33% of people in the U.S. admitted to the hospital for heart failure also have diabetes. Heart failure may be the result of a co-condition, such as hypertension or coronary heart disease, but not always.

A study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Diabetes Mellitus Is an Independent Predictor for the Development of Heart Failure: A Population Study, examines the idea of diabetic cardiomyopathy and heart failure from the effects of diabetes alone.

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Genetic Variant Largely Found in Patients of African Descent Increases Risk for Heart Failure

A genetic variant in the gene transthyretin (TTR) is a more significant cause of heart failure than previously believed. The study also revealed that a disease caused by this genetic variant, called hereditary transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy, is significantly underdiagnosed.

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Researchers Discover New Mutations in Gene Associated with Disease That Causes Weakening of the Heart

Researchers from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have identified new mutations in a gene commonly associated with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDC), a disease that weakens the heart muscle, making it more difficult to adequately circulate blood to meet the body’s needs.

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