Software competition advances understanding of genetic function

Sequencing a genome doesn’t necessarily reveal the functions of individual genes. An Iowa State University scientist helps to organize a competition to evaluate the accuracy of software programs that predict gene function. The recently published results of the latest competition included 144 entries from 68 teams.

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24th Annual Boe Forum Explores the Impact of Genetic Engineering on our Future

Augustana University and the Center for Western Studies announced Drs. Robert Green and Jamie Metzl as keynote speakers for the 24th Boe Forum on Public Affairs to be held at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, March 23, in the Elmen Center.This year’s forum, “Are We Ready? The Science, Ethics, and Geopolitics of Genetic Engineering and Preventive Genomics,” will examine the relationship between genetics and health, the ability to predict and thereby prevent disease, and the geopolitics of genetic engineering and genomics.

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Scientists Find Molecular Key to Body Making Healthy T Cells

In a finding that could help lead to new therapies for immune diseases like multiple sclerosis and IBD, scientists report in the Journal of Experimental Medicine identifying a gene and family of proteins critical to the formation of mature and fully functioning T cells in the immune system.

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Clues from DNA could help predict growth of prostate cancer

Researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions in the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom and Singapore, have identified 1,178 biomarkers in men’s genomes — the complete set of genetic material inherited from one’s parents — that predict how an individual person’s prostate cancer will grow.
The finding suggests that predicting how a person’s cancer will evolve may lie in their inherited DNA.

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Singapore researchers reveal inflated performance measurements in current enhancer-promoter interaction prediction methods

A study conducted by researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore and the School of Biological Sciences at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) revealed a common deficiency in existing artificial intelligence methods used to predict enhancer–promoter interactions, that may result in inflated performance measurements.

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