Genetics/biotech expert offers comments & availability on IVG (in vitro gametogenesis) major breakthrough

A groundbreaking study demonstrating the most advanced form of in vitro gametogenesis (making eggs from stem cells, IVG) was published Thursday in Science. See STAT’s coverage of the study.  Regarding the study and breakthrough, Dr. Kevin Doxzen offers the below comments…

New wiki on salivary proteins may transform diagnostic testing and personalized medicine

To improve the development of new saliva-based diagnostic tests and personalized medicine, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) has supported the development of the Human Salivary Proteome Wiki, the first public platform that catalogs and curates data on each of the thousands of proteins within our saliva.

Lurie Children’s Study to Use Soy Isoflavones in a Precision Medicine Approach to Prevent Wheezing and Asthmatic Inflammation in High Risk Infants

Rajesh Kumar, MD, and Jacqueline Pongracic, MD, from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago received $3 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a site-specific clinical trial on whether a soy supplement in infancy can prevent asthma in children with a high-risk genetic variation. This will be one of the earliest precision medicine approaches to asthma prevention.

Precision medicine, digital technology hold potential as powerful tools against tuberculosis

The global fight against tuberculosis is gaining some powerful tools. Precision medicine — already used to personalize diagnosis and treatment of noncommunicable diseases such as cancer — and health care technologies such as telemedicine have the potential to advance the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis, says Zelalem Temesgen, M.D., an infectious diseases expert and medical director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis.

Combination thyroid hormone therapies treat hypothyroidism as well as levothyroxine

Treatment of hypothyroidism, which results from an underactive thyroid gland, should be individualized and consideration should be given to alternatives to the first-line therapy, including desiccated thyroid extract and combination therapy to replace the body’s two main thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Results of their new randomized clinical study are being presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Biotechnology research and policy expert joins Thunderbird School of Global Management and Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at ASU through World Economic Forum fellowship

Thunderbird School of Global Management announces the first of two prestigious Hoffmann Fellowships appointed in collaboration with the World Economic Forum for post-doctoral research and policy innovation at the intersection of society, science and technology.

Advances in COVID-19 Testing, Artificial Intelligence, Cancer Therapies, and The Future of Precision Medicine to Be Explored at The All-Virtual 2020 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting

In the wake of the novel coronavirus pandemic, the need for reliable, accurate, and accessible laboratory testing is more evident than ever before. At the 2020 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, laboratory medicine experts will present the cutting-edge research and technology that is revolutionizing clinical testing and patient care for COVID-19 and across the spectrum of healthcare.

The Future of Precision Medicine

Precision medicine is a rapidly growing approach to health care that focuses on finding treatments and interventions that work for people based on their genetic makeup, rather than their symptoms.

Zeeshan Ahmed, director of the new Ahmed Lab at Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, discusses the future of precision medicine, what needs to be done to successfully analyze the data necessary to develop individualized treatments and the role genetics play during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Thomas J. Fuchs, DSc, Named Dean of Artificial Intelligence and Human Health and Co-Director of the Hasso Plattner Institute for Digital Health at Mount Sinai

Appointment Advances Health System’s Role as Leader in AI and Digital Health

Johns Hopkins Researchers Offer Lessons Learned From Early Covid-19 Patients

Using a combination of demographic and clinical data gathered from seven weeks of COVID-19 patient care early in the coronavirus pandemic, Johns Hopkins researchers today published a “prediction model” they say can help other hospitals care for COVID-19 patients — and make important decisions about planning and resource allocations.

UChicago bioinformatics team to create data infrastructure for global pediatric cancer initiative

The University of Chicago Pediatric Cancer Data Commons and The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society are working together to bring precision medicine to children and young adults with acute leukemia.

Who Could Benefit From Exercise and Behavioral Treatment?

Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise. Unique to this precision medicine study, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, is an assessment of cognitive control and reward-related brain activity, two facets of brain function that are impaired in people with depression. Like previous studies, this one showed that aerobic exercise helps young adults with major depression.

Phosphoprotein biomarkers to guide cancer therapy are identified

Post-translational modification analysis may broadly identify new biomarkers of cancer drivers for a much more precise prediction of patient responses to treatments. A recent study demonstrates this diagnostic alternative for neuroendocrine neoplasms driven by a protein kinase called Cdk5.

Johns Hopkins Medicine Announces Microsoft Azure Will Become Its Preferred Cloud Platform for Its inHealth Precision Medicine Initiative

Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM) today announced a five-year relationship with Microsoft Corp. centered on Microsoft’s Azure and analytical tools that will support new discoveries, as part of JHM’s inHealth precision medicine initiative. The work will bring together JHM’s leading global research expertise with the power of Microsoft Azure and its artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities and flexible infrastructure to advance JHM’s discoveries that will benefit personalized health care. Johns Hopkins will maintain total control over its data.

FAU Medicine Ushers in New Research Phase to Prevent Dementia

FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine and The Harry T. Mangurian, Jr. Foundation have joined forces again to usher in a new phase of research to prevent dementia. The extension of a three-year, $3 million grant from the foundation will launch the new FAU Center for Brain Health. The grant supports precision medicine approaches to prevent dementia, which will be further strengthened by leveraging multiple patient-centered platforms through state-of-the-art transdisciplinary approaches.

UCLA Health’s Dr. Clara Lajonchere elected Chair of the California Precision Medicine Advisory Council

Dr. Clara Lajonchere, deputy director of the Institute for Precision Health at UCLA Health, has been elected chair of the new California Precision Medicine Advisory Council.

First-of-its-Kind Personalized ‘COVID-19 Risk Score’ Launches to Enable Safer Re-opening and Return to Work Plans

Coriell Life Sciences is rolling out a new tool in the fight against COVID-19: personalized COVID-19 Risk Scores designed to enable safer re-opening and return to work plans (especially given the recent release of the CDC guidelines for re-opening).

Calibrated approach to AI and deep learning models could more reliably diagnose and treat disease

In a recent preprint (available through Cornell University’s open access website arXiv), a team led by a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory computer scientist proposes a novel deep learning approach aimed at improving the reliability of classifier models designed for predicting disease types from diagnostic images, with an additional goal of enabling interpretability by a medical expert without sacrificing accuracy. The approach uses a concept called confidence calibration, which systematically adjusts the model’s predictions to match the human expert’s expectations in the real world.

Researchers Identify Mechanism to Explain Role of Certain Gene Mutations in Kidney Disease

Researchers from the Center for Precision Disease Modeling at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have uncovered a mechanism that appears to explain how certain genetic mutations give rise to a rare genetic kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome. Using a drosophila (fruit fly) model, they found mutations in genes that code for certain proteins lead to a disruption of the recycling of the cell membrane.

Henry Ford Health System Receives $25 Million Gift, Largest Single Donation in its History

Nationally-known developer Chris Jeffries and his wife Lisa have donated $25 million to Henry Ford Health System, the largest single gift from an individual in the health system’s 105-year history. This historic gift will rapidly accelerate the growth and expansion of Henry Ford’s Precision Medicine program, with the ultimate goal of creating a Precision Health Center. The efforts will have a robust focus on the advancement of cancer research and treatment, while also expanding to other medical specialties treating behavioral health, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

PECASE Honoree Sohini Ramachandran Studies the Genetic Foundations of Traits in Diverse Populations

NIGMS grantee and presidential award recipient Sohini Ramachandran, Ph.D., is challenging our understanding of genetic variation among human populations. She discusses her research on how the genetic composition of traits and diseases varies among populations, the value of statistical and computational work in human genetics, and what this all means for patient treatment.

Coriell Researchers Identify SNP Associated with Obesity Risk

Obesity is among the most common complex diseases in the United States and has been a stubborn public health challenge for decades. Its causes are wide ranging, but genetic heritability is increasingly understood to be an influential factor in determining a person’s risk for the disease. Coriell researchers have found a new genetic indicator of obesity risk and bolstered the understood importance of one gene’s role in obesity risk.

Superior “Bio-Ink” for 3D Printing Pioneered

Rutgers biomedical engineers have developed a “bio-ink” for 3D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body. Their study was published in the journal Biointerphases.

Tissue-Engineering, Estrogenic Chemical–Induced Responses, and Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Featured in January 2020 Toxicological Sciences

In addition to research exploring such areas as biomarkers, nano- and neurotoxicology, and developmental and reproductive toxicology, the January 2020 issue of Toxicological Sciences features a new article category, ToxPoint, to underscore cutting-edge topics in toxicology.

ISPOR Publishes 2020 Top 10 Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HEOR) Trends Report

ISPOR—the professional society for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR), announced the publication of its 2020 Top 10 HEOR Trends report. In the report, the Society has identified the top 10 HEOR trends that will shape the field and influence healthcare over 2020 and the near future.

Mayo Clinic researchers look at post menopause as key factor in endometrial cancer

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy in the U.S. and the fourth most common cancer among women. In addition, endometrial cancer incidence rates are on the rise in the western world, suggesting that alterations in environmental factors such as diet, lifestyle, and the vaginal microbiome may be important drivers in its cause.

Researchers Find New Role for Dopamine in Gene Transcription and Cell Proliferation

A joint group of researchers at the George Washington University and the University of Pittsburgh have found that dopamine and the dopamine D2 receptor modulate expression via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. This pathway is responsible for control of cell proliferation and organ identity and is implicated in cancer, thus having broad implications for health and development of new therapeutics