Promising New Treatment for Patients with HR+ HER-2 Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

New research from Yale Cancer Center reveals first-of-its-kind data from a phase I study in patients with hormone receptor positive HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The results, which assess the safety and efficacy of a treatment known as PF-07248144, offer new hope for treating this aggressive type of breast cancer.

MD Anderson researcher Sharon Dent elected to prestigious National Academy of Sciences

Sharon Dent, Ph.D., professor of Epigenetics and Molecular Carcinogenesis at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Dent is a global leader in the field of chromatin research whose foundational work has helped define the role of chromatin in cancer growth and development.

Could Epigenetic Age Acceleration, Not Actual Age, Better Predict How Well You Remember?

A study led by researchers at Stony Brook University shows that age acceleration, when one’s so-called biological clock runs quicker than one’s actual age, is linked to poorer memory and slower rates of processing information. The team measured biological “clocks” derived from the DNA of 142 adults aged 25-65 years old and had the participants complete daily cognitive tests on smartphones. Their findings, which imply that epigenetic age acceleration could be a better indicator of how well a person remembers information and how quickly they work with information, are detailed in the Journal of Gerontology: Biological Sciences.

Do Children Inherit Parents’ Stressful Experiences?

Scientists are discovering that a parent’s experiences can lead to changes in gene expression that are encoded in the sperm or egg and passed to offspring. In other words, there is a way in which offspring inherit the experiences of their parents. This is different than inheriting genes for brown or blue eyes. It’s more like inheriting genes that are switched on or off for the purpose of being better adapted to a particular environment.

UC Irvine to lead multi-institutional study of single-cell vulnerabilities to Alzheimer’s disease

The University of California, Irvine has received a five-year, $10 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to lead a multi-institutional study of specific brain cell vulnerabilities to abnormal tau protein deposits in regions affected in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

Long Telomeres, the Endcaps on DNA, Not the Fountain of Youth Once Thought — Scientists May Now Know Why

In a study of 17 people from five families, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they found that ultra-lengthy DNA endcaps called telomeres fail to provide the longevity presumed for such people. Instead, people with long telomeres tend to develop a range of benign and cancerous tumors, as well as the age-related blood condition clonal hematopoiesis.

First Stem Cells From a Bat Species Known to Harbor SARS-CoV-2 Could Shed Light on Virus Survival and Molecular Adaptability

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have generated the first induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from bats, gaining valuable insights into the close relationship between bats and viruses.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for February 1, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back.

Found! Lost Puzzle Piece Involved in Gene Regulation Revealed in Search That Began in Water-Loving, One-Celled Organism

After an intrepid, decade-long search, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have found a new role for a pair of enzymes that regulate genome function and, when missing or mutated, are linked to diseases such as brain tumors, blood cancers and Kleefstra syndrome — a rare genetic, neurocognitive disorder.

Trailblazing scientists discuss exposome research, precision nutrition at Mayo Clinic’s Individualizing Medicine Conference  

The next frontier in individualized medicine is here. Mayo Clinic’s 11th annual Individualizing Medicine Conference on Nov. 2–3 will focus on “Exploring the Exposome” — the cumulative measure of environmental influences and associated biological responses throughout the life span of a person, and how those exposures relate to health and disease.  

Estée Lauder endowment will establish epigenetics fellowship at UCI

The University of California, Irvine today announced an endowment from Estée Lauder to establish an epigenetics fellowship in honor of the late Paolo Sassone-Corsi, Ph.D., who was UCI’s Donald Bren Professor of Biological Chemistry and director of the campus’s Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism.

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Identifies Molecular Markers to Increase Precision in Treatment of Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is a cancer of the eye that occurs in infants and toddlers and can lead to loss of vision, loss of one or both eyes, and even death. Unlike most tumors, these cannot be biopsied because of the risk of spreading cancer to the rest of the body. In 2017, Jesse Berry, MD, surgeon and ocular oncologist at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, discovered that fluid removed from the eye during treatment of retinoblastoma contained tumor DNA and functioned as a liquid biopsy—providing information about the tumor and opening the door to earlier diagnosis and treatment.

Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation and Harrington Discovery Institute Invite Proposals for 2022 ADDF-Harrington Scholar Award

Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals and the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) announce a joint request for proposals for the 2022 ADDF-Harrington Scholar Award. The ADDF-Harrington Scholar Award is designed to accelerate the translation of innovative research that could treat, prevent, or slow Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias.

The Request for Proposal (RFP) is open to academic investigators at accredited medical centers, research institutions, and universities in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Researchers working on drug development programs that are relevant to, but not presently focused on, the Alzheimer’s field are also encouraged to apply. This award provides a combination of financial support and expert drug development guidance to provide the best chance to move research beyond the bench to the bedside.

Stress during Pregnancy May Lead to Heart Disease, Accelerated Aging in Next Generation

Prenatal stress can cause damage in the aorta in offspring, which may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and accelerate aging, according to a new study in mice. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Coriell Institute for Medical Research, Van Andel Institute Awarded Estimated $12.4 Million SPORE Grant from National Cancer Institute

The Coriell Institute for Medical Research and Van Andel Institute (VAI) have been awarded a prestigious Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (or SPORE) grant from the National Cancer Institute (award P50CA254897). The five-year grant valued at an estimated $12.4 million will support nearly 20 scientists as they work to improve epigenetic therapies for cancer. The project is co-led by Coriell’s President and CEO Jean-Pierre Issa, MD, Van Andel Institute’s Chief Scientific Officer Peter A. Jones, PhD, DSc (hon), and Johns Hopkins University and VAI’s Stephen Baylin, MD.

Diverse DNA signatures linked to heart disease

Risk for heart disease does not look the same on the genetic level for different population groups, report an international team of researchers this month in the journal JAMA Cardiology. The study, led by Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, begins to outline gene activity patterns that could serve as early warning indicators for cardiovascular disease.

The Latest Science on Staying Healthy During Pregnancy

Healthy habits are particularly important during pregnancy. Four new studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE look at how supplements, eating habits and physical activity can affect various aspects of health during pregnancy.

Study: New Approach May Boost Prostate Cancer Immunotherapies

Researchers have discovered a new way to transform the tissues surrounding prostate tumors to help the body’s immune cells fight the cancer. The discovery, made in human and mouse cells and in laboratory mice, could lead to improvements in immunotherapy treatments for prostate cancer, the second most common cancer in men in the U.S.

Mount Sinai Scientists Discover an Epigenetic Mechanism Contributing to Lifelong Stress Susceptibility

An epigenetic modification that occurs in a major cell type in the brain’s reward circuitry controls how stress early in life increases susceptibility to additional stress in adulthood, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have learned.

Exercise during Pregnancy Protects Kids’ Future Health from Parents’ Obesity

New research in mice suggests that exercising during pregnancy may help prevent children—especially boys—from developing health problems related to their parents’ obesity. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for February.

Strange colon discovery explains racial disparities in colorectal cancer

The colons of African-Americans and people of European descent age differently, new research reveals, helping explain racial disparities in colorectal cancer – the cancer that killed beloved “Black Panther” star Chadwick Boseman.

UNH Researchers Discover New Inhibitor Drug Combination for Rare Form of Cancer

Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare form of lymphoma, does not have any known cure and only one FDA-approved treatment making it challenging to treat patients. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire took the novel approach of targeting specific cell proteins that control DNA information using inhibitors, or drugs, that were effective in reducing the growth of the cancer cells and when combined with a third drug were even more successful in killing the WM cancer cells which could lead to more treatment options.

The Novel Role of Microglia as Modulators of Neurons in the Brain Is Discovered by Mount Sinai Researchers

Findings offer potential target for treating behavioral abnormalities associated with neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s Disease

Center for Alcohol Research in Epigenetics at UIC receives $8M from NIH

The University of Illinois at Chicago received $8.2 million from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to continue the Center for Alcohol Research in Epigenetics and its research on how alcohol affects genes through epigenetics — chemical changes to DNA, RNA or proteins that alter the expression of genes without directly modifying them.

Diabetes Drug May Protect Breastfed Sons from Future Metabolic Disorder

Article title: Lactational metformin exposure programs offspring white adipose tissue glucose homeostasis and resilience to metabolic stress in a sex-dependent manner Authors: Zach Carlson, Hannah Hafner, Molly Mulcahy, Kaylie Bullock, Allen Zhu, Dave Bridges, Ernesto Bernal-Mizrachi, Brigid Gregg From the authors: “Future…

A Novel Class of Long Non-coding RNAs May Help Explain Increased Susceptibility of Females to Depression

Researchers at Mount Sinai have found that a novel class of genes known as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) expressed in the brain may play a pivotal role in regulating mood and driving sex-specific susceptibility versus resilience to depression.

First Molecular Test in US to Better Detect Brain Tumors Now Available to Patients

NYU Langone Health and its Perlmutter Cancer Center have launched clinical whole genome DNA methylation profiling for patients with brain tumors.
This leading-edge molecular assay utilizes DNA epigenetic signatures and artificial intelligence with machine learning to correctly identify and subtype brain tumors. NYU Langone Health is the first Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratory in the United States to receive state approval (New York State Department of Health) for whole genome DNA methylation for diagnosis and classification of brain tumors.