Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Identifies Molecular Markers to Increase Precision in Treatment of Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma is a cancer of the eye that occurs in infants and toddlers and can lead to loss of vision, loss of one or both eyes, and even death. Unlike most tumors, these cannot be biopsied because of the risk of spreading cancer to the rest of the body. In 2017, Jesse Berry, MD, surgeon and ocular oncologist at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, discovered that fluid removed from the eye during treatment of retinoblastoma contained tumor DNA and functioned as a liquid biopsy—providing information about the tumor and opening the door to earlier diagnosis and treatment.

DNA Shed From Colon Cancers Into Bloodstream Successfully Guides Chemotherapy After Surgery

A multi-institutional, international study, led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and WEHI in Melbourne, Australia, found that testing for ctDNA after surgery and directing chemotherapy to ctDNA-positive patients reduced the use of chemotherapy overall without compromising recurrence-free survival.

Biomarker in Liquid Biopsy for Lung Cancer Appears More Accurate in Predicting Immunotherapy Response Than Tumor Biopsy

Mount Sinai researchers have validated for the first time that a simple blood test called a liquid biopsy could be a better predictor of whether cancer immunotherapy will be successful for a patient with lung cancer than an invasive tumor biopsy procedure. Their study was published in the Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research in June.

NUS researchers develop world’s first blood test for real-time monitoring of cancer treatment success

A team of researchers from the NUS Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Health Innovation & Technology has developed a novel blood test called ExoSCOPE that could tell doctors whether cancer treatment is working for a patient, within 24 hours after the treatment. This will enable doctors to customise the treatment plan to improve patients’ chances of recovery.

Liquid biopsy for colorectal cancer could guide therapy for tumors

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that a liquid biopsy examining blood or urine can help gauge the effectiveness of therapy for colorectal cancer that has just begun to spread beyond the original tumor. Such a biopsy can detect lingering disease and could serve as a guide for deciding whether a patient should undergo further treatments.

Cancer Research Institute and The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research Launch Collaboration to Evaluate Liquid Biopsy for More Accurate and Rapid Assessment of Lung Cancer Patient Response to Immunotherapy

The Cancer Research Institute (CRI) and The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research have launched a clinical trial that aims to demonstrate the utility of a novel, ultra-sensitive biomarker-directed blood test, or liquid biopsy, in assessing cancer patient responses to immunotherapy.

JNCCN Study Explores if Insurance is Keeping Pace with Trends in Targeted Cancer Therapy

New research from the University of California, San Francisco (USCF) and City of Hope in the July 2020 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network examines coverage trends for circulating tumor DNA testing, also known as gene sequencing of ctDNA or “liquid biopsies.” The researchers found coverage rate rose from 0% to 38% in three years. The policies also increased in scope from 2017-2019, going from one cancer type to 12.

Biomarker test highly accurate in detecting early kidney cancer

A novel liquid biopsy method can detect kidney cancers with high accuracy, including small, localized tumors which are often curable but for which no early detection method exists, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
The report in Nature Medicine suggests that if validated in larger trials and applied widely, the non-invasive test could find more early kidney cancers when they haven’t spread, thus reducing the mortality of the disease.