World Osteoporosis Day is next week on October 20; Orthopaedic surgeons can help break down the signs and symptoms of this silent bone disease

ROSEMONT, Ill. (October 11, 2022)—Did you know that osteoporosis can cause bones to become so weak and fragile that they can break with the most minor bump, sudden movement or even sneeze? Often referred to as the “silent disease” because…

Updated Guideline Introduces Recommendations for Prevention and Treatment of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) released a summary of its updated guideline for the Prevention and Treatment of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis. New osteoporosis medications and new literature have become available since the last ACR treatment guideline was published in 2017.

Vitamin D Supplements May Offset Bone Loss Caused by Diabetes Drug

Vitamin D supplementation may help offset damaging bone loss that occurs in some people who take canagliflozin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug. Researchers will present their work this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Smoke Break: UNLV Study Strengthens Link Between Smoking and Increased Fracture Risk in Men

It’s no secret that puffing cigarettes is the culprit behind a host of ailments, including respiratory diseases and throat cancer. But a new UNLV study reveals that male smokers — who, demographically, are more likely than women to light up — are also placing themselves at a significantly increased risk of osteoporosis, bone fractures, and early death.

Cedars-Sinai Offers Program to Catch Older Adults Before They Fall

Falls and broken bones are common among older adults, but they’re not a natural part of aging. That’s why Cedars-Sinai geriatricians created a bone health and falls risk consultation program to catch at-risk people before they break a bone or help them avoid another fracture in the future.

A Prune—Or Six—a Day May Keep Inflammation at Bay

A study in postmenopausal people suggests eating nutrient-rich prunes every day may be beneficial to bone health, reducing inflammatory factors that contribute to osteoporosis. The research will be presented this week in Philadelphia at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

Study: Obesity raises the risk of gum disease by inflating growth of bone-destroying cells

Chronic inflammation caused by obesity may trigger the development of cells that break down bone tissue, including the bone that holds teeth in place, according to new University at Buffalo research that sought to improve understanding of the connection between obesity and gum disease.

Osteoporosis drug prescribing often does not follow guidelines

Less than one in 10 commercially insured patients in the United States who broke a hip, a major complication of osteoporosis, receive any osteoporosis medical treatment within two calendar quarters of their fracture, according to a study whose results will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

Endocrine Society joins ASBMR and other bone health organizations to provide guidance on COVID-19 vaccine and osteoporosis

As COVID-19 vaccines continue to be distributed, the world’s leading bone health research, clinical, and patient advocacy organizations ASBMR, Endocrine Society, AACE, ECTS, NOF, and IOF provide recommendations to assist clinicians in managing osteoporosis treatments for their patients who plan to get vaccinated. The full guidance document with supporting evidence is available at https://www.asbmr.org/about/statement-detail/joint-guidance-on-covid-19-vaccine-osteoporosis

Romosozumab Substantially Builds Bone Density in Hip and Spine, With Even More Gains When Followed by Antiresorptive Drug

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College Rheumatology’s annual meeting, reveals that romosozumab, an osteoporosis drug, produces substantial gains in bone mineral density in the hip and lumbar spine within one year, and that transitioning patients to a potent antiresorptive drug can lead to even more bone density gains.

Mount Sinai Researchers Develop a First-in-Class Humanized Antibody Targeting Bone and Fat

Blocking the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) whose levels rise at menopause could solve bone loss and weight gain Senior Author: Mone Zaidi, MD, PhD, MACP, Director of the Mount Sinai Bone Program and Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease) at…

JNCCN: New Research Finds Low Bone Health Testing Rates after Prostate Cancer Treatment

New research in the October 2020 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds the rate of bone mineral density (BMD) testing in people with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has improved in recent years, but remains low.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Ocean acidification causing coral ‘osteoporosis’ on iconic reefs

Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification is affecting corals’ ability to build their skeletons, but it has been challenging to isolate its effect from that of simultaneous warming ocean temperatures, which also influence coral growth. New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals the distinct impact that ocean acidification is having on coral growth on some of the world’s iconic reefs.

Two Widely-Used Drugs for Erectile Dysfunction Could Be Repurposed to Treat Osteoporosis

Why the Research Is Interesting: Osteoporosis is a global public health problem that affects almost 200 million people worldwide. Erectile dysfunction is the most common male sexual dysfunction in the aging population, with more than 70% of men over the…

Novel Research in AACC’s Clinical Chemistry Journal Shows That Vitamin D Supplements Do Not Prevent Osteoporotic Fractures

A first-of-its-kind study published in AACC’s Clinical Chemistry journal has found that low vitamin D levels alone do not cause osteoporotic fractures. This research could resolve the longstanding debate over whether vitamin D supplements prevent these fractures, and indicates that members of the general population should not rely on vitamin D by itself for this purpose.

Broken bone location can have significant impact on long-term health

In older individuals, the location of a broken bone can have significant impacts on long-term health outcomes, according to research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

Artificial intelligence improves X-ray identification of patients with broken bones

Artificial intelligence that can “read” electronic radiology reports and flag patients with broken bones who are at risk of osteoporosis outperformed the traditional manual method of health care professionals reading X-ray reports, a new study finds. The results were accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting, and will be published in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.