Penn Medicine-Led Research Team Awarded $2.9 Million to Study Heart Disease and Cancer in Black and Hispanic Communities

The Cardio-Oncology Translational Center of Excellence at Penn Medicine has been awarded $2.9 million by the American Heart Association as part of a larger effort to reduce disparities in cardio-oncology and increase understanding of cardiovascular disease among cancer patients and survivors from minority populations. As part of this newly established research program, scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and other institutions will study patients with breast or prostate cancer, the most common cancers in women and men, respectively, with a focus on Black and Hispanic communities.

Fat Tissue Protein Signaling May Lead to Treatment to Improve Heart Health in People Who Can’t Exercise

Article title: Aerobic exercise training reduces cardiac function and coronary flow-induced vasodilation in mice lacking adiponectin Authors: Jacob T. Caldwell, Karissa M. Dieseldorff Jones, Hyerim Park, Jose R. Pinto, Payal Ghosh, Emily C. Reid-Foley, Brody Ulrich, Michael D. Delp, Brad…

Most Americans Are Not Getting Enough Fiber in Our Diets

Only 5% of men and 9% of women are getting the recommended daily amount of dietary fiber, according to a study being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. Insufficient fiber intake is associated with a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, two of the most common diseases in the U.S.

Two Mount Sinai Leaders Receive Prestigious Honors from American Heart Association in New York City

Two of Mount Sinai’s top doctors will be honored with prestigious awards at the American Heart Association’s New York City Heart and Stroke Ball, taking place virtually on Wednesday, June 9.

Fat Around the Heart Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Failure

EMBARGOED UNTIL MAY 24 2:00PM EST (New York, NY – May 24, 2021) – Having excess pericardial fat—fat around the heart—increases the risk of developing heart failure, especially in women, according to new Mount Sinai research. Women with high amounts…

Study of AI-enabled EKGs finds that a difference between numerical age and biological age significantly affects health, longevity

You might be older ― or younger ― than you think. A new study found that differences between a person’s age in years and his or her biological age, as predicted by an artificial intelligence (AI)-enabled EKG, can provide measurable insights into health and longevity.

Molecular Alteration May Be Cause — Not Consequence — of Heart Failure

Clinicians and scientists have long observed that cells in overstressed hearts have high levels of the simple sugar O-GlcNAc modifying thousands of proteins within cells. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have found evidence in mouse experiments that these excess sugars could well be a cause, not merely a consequence or marker of heart failure.

Experimental Biology 2021 Press Materials Available Now

Embargoed press materials are now available for the virtual Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting, featuring cutting-edge multidisciplinary research from across the life sciences. EB 2021, to be held April 27–30, is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together thousands of scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community.

Announcing Virtual Press Conference for Experimental Biology 2021 Meeting

Reporters are invited to join a live Q&A discussion of exciting research announcements at the forefront of the life sciences during a virtual press conference for the Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting. The press conference will be held online from 1–1:45 p.m. EDT on Monday, April 26, 2021 (RSVP by Friday, April 23).

Johns Hopkins Medicine Expert Creates Comprehensive Guide to New Diabetes Drugs

New medicines for people who have diabetes seem to pop up all the time. Drugs that help the body break down carbohydrates, drugs that increase excretion of glucose in the urine, drugs that help muscles respond to insulin and drugs that stimulate the pancreas to produce it — the list of pharmaceutical options to treat diabetes gets longer and longer.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Genetic testing proves beneficial in prescribing effective blood thinners

A new research paper funded in part by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) shows a clear advantage of genetic testing in helping health care providers choose the appropriate anti-platelet drug. Testing helps determine if a patient carries genetic variants in CYP2C19 that cause loss of its function. These variants interfere with the body’s ability to metabolize and activate clopidogrel, an anti-platelet medication.

In women, higher body fat may protect against heart disease death, study shows

A new UCLA study shows that while men and women who have high muscle mass are less likely to die from heart disease, it also appears that women who have higher levels of body fat — regardless of their muscle mass — have a greater degree of protection than women with less fat.

Using Stimuli-Responsive Biomaterials to Understand Heart Development, Disease

The heart cannot regenerate new tissue, because cardiomyocytes, or heart muscle cells, do not divide after birth. However, researchers have now developed a shape memory polymer to grow cardiomyocytes. Raising the material’s temperature turned the polymer’s flat surface into nanowrinkles, which promoted cardiomyocyte alignment. The research is part of the growing field of mechanobiology, which investigates how physical forces between cells and changes in their mechanical properties contribute to development, cell differentiation, physiology, and disease.

Exercise Improves Blood Vessel Dysfunction Caused by Lack of Sleep

Article title: Regular aerobic exercise counteracts endothelial vasomotor dysfunction associated with insufficient sleep Authors: Kelly A. Stockelman, Anthony R. Bain, Caitlin A. Dow, Kyle J. Diehl, Jared J. Greiner, Brian L. Stauffer, Christopher A. DeSouza From the authors: “Regular aerobic…

Shift Work Disrupts Kidney Rhythms, Contributes to Kidney and Heart Disease

Article title: Environmental circadian disruption suppresses rhythms in kidney function and accelerates excretion of renal injury markers in urine of male hypertensive rats Authors: Atlantis M. Hill, G. Ryan Crislip, Adam Stowie, Ivory Ellis, Anne Ramsey, Oscar Castanon-Cervantes, Michelle L.…

Marijuana May Increase Risk of Heart Disease in Healthy Adults

Article title: Habitual cannabis use is associated with altered cardiac mechanics and arterial stiffness, but not endothelial function in young healthy smokers Authors: Christian P. Cheung, Alexandra Michelle Coates, Philip J. Millar, Jamie F. Burr From the authors: “Our cross-sectional data…

A New Beat Offers Free Online Seminar Examining Disparities in Cardiovascular Care During Heart Month

The Association of Black Cardiologists, Inc. (ABC) and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is offering a complimentary online seminar, “Tackling Disparities in CV Care: A Closer Look at Hypertension and Heart Failure” on Friday February 26, 2021. The program is part of a joint initiative called A New Beat which advocates for women and minorities rising as leaders in cardiology. It aims to foster careers of female and minority cardiologists, who can be poised to improve access to quality care for underserved populations.

World-Renowned Interventional Cardiologist Establishes Structural Heart Disease Research Fund in Honor of Late Wife

William O’Neill, M.D., director of the Center for Structural Heart Disease at Henry Ford Health System, has donated $1 million to establish the Carol S. O’Neill Structural Heart Disease Research Fund at Henry Ford Health System in honor of his late wife, Carol, who passed away in 2019.

Heart Valve Collaboratory Announces U.S. Food and Drug Administration Participation in Collaborative Community

The Heart Valve Collaboratory (HVC) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) will participate in this “collaborative community”. A medical “collaboratory” is a forum in which multidisciplinary private and public sector members work together on medical device challenges to achieve aligned outcomes, solve shared problems, and leverage collective opportunities, in the interest of improving patient care.

American Heart Month: FSU experts available to comment on heart disease topics

By: Kelsey Klopfenstein | Published: February 3, 2021 | 1:14 pm | SHARE: Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Someone has a heart attack every 39 seconds, and cardiovascular disease claims more lives each year than all forms of cancer combined, according to the American Heart Association’s 2021 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update.

CRF Offers Free Online Seminar to Help People Jump-Start their Heart Health During Heart Month

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, The Big Three: High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, and Diabetes, at 12:00 PM ET on February 22, 2021 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Sonia Tolani, cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar is part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative (WHHI), which empowers women with everyday tools they can use to defy heart disease.

Heart Disease and COVID-19: Focusing on Exercise, Mental Health, and Nutrition are Critical for High-Risk Groups

February is American Heart Month and cardiologists from the Mount Sinai Health System are sharing tips on heart disease prevention to lower the risk of heart attack, stroke, and COVID-19.

Coconut Oil’s Benefits to Alzheimer’s Ignored in N.Y. Times Attack, Says Dr. Leslie Norins of MCI911.com

Although cardiologists often decry coconut oil because of certain fats it contains, they overlook the growing evidence that other fatty constituents, especially medium-chain triglycerides, may alleviate some cases of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

Free Access to TCT Connect Extended for One Year

All educational programming from TCT Connect will be available to registrants for free through October 18, 2021. TCT is the annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) and the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.

Statins can save lives, are they being used?

People who have coronary artery disease, stroke or peripheral artery disease often are prescribed a statin, a cholesterol-lowering drug that reduces the risk of heart attack or stroke.In a recent publication in JAMA Network Open, Mayo Clinic researchers identify trends in statin use across the U.S. among people with these diseases, as well as among those who already had a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Their data indicate that only about 60% of patients are getting the recommended therapy.