PET technology more effective than angiogram at determining need for coronary stents, bypass surgery

A new method for determining whether patients with heart disease need coronary stents or bypass surgery is more effective than the angiogram, which is currently used, according to research from UTHealth Houston Heart & Vascular.

Gender Affirmation Treatment Delivery Route May Affect Heart Health

Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) people assigned male at birth are at increased heart health risk. The delivery route of estrogen medication is known to affect heart health risk in cisgender women. However, research is lacking on how estrogen route affects heart health in the TGD population.

Restored blood flow meant less pain, better quality of life for those with leg artery disease

estoring blood flow to the legs, whether through bypass surgery or a less invasive artery-opening procedure with a stent, reduced pain and improved quality of life for people with peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to preliminary, late-breaking research presented today at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2022.

Stroke, Clot Risk Halved in Heart Disease and Arrhythmia Patients Who Took Blood Thinners Apixaban Versus Rivaroxaban

The new study showed apixaban is superior to rivaroxaban against stroke or systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation and valvular heart disease

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Named President of Mount Sinai Heart

Mount Sinai Health System’s globally acclaimed cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, has been named President of Mount Sinai Heart, a newly created position, effective Sunday, January 1, 2023. Dr. Fuster will continue in his roles as Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital and as the Richard Gorlin, MD/Heart Research Foundation Professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Rate of food insecurity skyrockets for Americans with cardiovascular disease, study finds

The number of Americans with cardiovascular disease who are food insecure – having limited or uncertain access to adequate food – has more than doubled over the last 20 years, a national study finds. Adults with cardiovascular disease were more than two times likely to be food insecure than those without the cardiovascular disease.

AI-guided screening uses ECG data to detect a hidden risk factor for stroke

An AI-guided targeted screening strategy is effective in detecting new cases of atrial fibrillation that would not have come to attention in routine clinical care.
This strategy could reduce the number of undiagnosed cases of atrial fibrillation, and prevent stroke and death in millions of patients across the globe.

A Consistent Lack of Sleep Negatively Impacts Immune Stem Cells, Increasing Risk of Inflammatory Disorders and Heart Disease

Mount Sinai study also shows catching up on sleep doesn’t reverse possible negative effects on cellular level

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Receives Prestigious Award from Cardiovascular Research Foundation

Mount Sinai Heart leader will be recognized for his exceptional career achievements at the 34th annual conference.

Risk factors for heart disease and stroke largely similar in men and women globally

The global study assessed risk factors, including metabolic (such as high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes), behavioural (smoking and diet), and psychosocial (economic status and depression) in about 156,000 people without a history of CVD between the ages of 35 and 70. Living in 21 low, middle and high-income countries on five continents, they were followed for an average of 10 years.

Low-Cost Disease Diagnosis by Mapping Heart Sounds

In the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers develop a method to identify aortic valve dysfunction using complex network analysis that is accurate, simple to use, and low-cost. They used heart sound data to create a complex network of connected points, which was split into sections, and each part was represented with a node. If the sound in two portions was similar, a line was drawn between them. In a healthy heart, the graph showed two distinct clusters of points, with many nodes unconnected. A heart with aortic stenosis contained many more correlations and edges.

University Hospitals Studying a Self-Management Treatment for Black Women with Depression and at Risk for High Blood Pressure

Researchers at University Hospitals, with support from an American Heart Association® grant, will work to better understand how to successfully treat Black women diagnosed with depression who are also at risk for high blood pressure.

New educational alliance between the American Heart Association and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation announced

Two leaders in cardiovascular disease science, research and education, the American Heart Association (Association) and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), are joining forces to strengthen and expand educational opportunities focused on advancing the latest research in cardiovascular disease and interventional therapies. The new alliance to produce joint education programs begins immediately with the organizations’ annual scientific meetings this fall. The Association will present educational programming from its annual Scientific Sessions at TCT, and CRF will deliver educational programming from its annual scientific symposium Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) at the Association’s Scientific Sessions, beginning with TCT 2022, September 16-19 in Boston, and the Association’s Scientific Sessions 2022, November 5-7 in Chicago, respectively.

Ochsner and Tulane collaboration uncovers what happens to genes inside artery plaques to trigger strokes

Researchers at Ochsner Health and Tulane University School of Medicine have identified the genes that become active in carotid arteries when plaque rupture causes a stroke. The work, published in Scientific Reports, was made possible by acquiring samples closer to the time of the stroke than previously possible. The results provide a picture of what the cells in the plaque are doing near the moment they induce a stroke.

Down on Vitamin D? It could be the cause of chronic inflammation

World-first genetic research from the University of South Australia shows a direct link between low levels of vitamin D and high levels of inflammation, providing an important biomarker to identify people at higher risk of or severity of chronic illnesses with an inflammatory component.

Increased heart disease risk from red meat may stem from gut microbe response to digestion

Chemicals produced in the digestive tract by gut microbes after eating red meat may help explain part of the higher risk of cardiovascular disease associated with red meat consumption, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association’s peer-reviewed journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology (ATVB).

Scientists discover genes that affect the risk of developing pre-leukaemia

The discovery of 14 inherited genetic changes which significantly increase the risk of a person developing a symptomless blood disorder associated with the onset of some types of cancer and heart disease is published today in Nature Genetics. The finding, made in one of the largest studies of its kind through genetic data analysis on 421,738 people, could pave the way for potential new approaches for the prevention and early detection of cancers including leukaemia.

Exercise + Sauna = Better Cardiovascular Function

New research suggests that adding a regular 15-minute sauna to an exercise routine may improve cardiovascular risk factors more than exercise alone. The study is the first randomized controlled trial to explore the long-term combination of exercise and sauna bathing in a non-clinical population. It is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

People of East Asian Descent Have More Vessels Reclog After Endovascular Treatment

Among people who received endovascular therapy to mechanically remove a clot in their large brain artery, those who had a rare genetic variant found primarily in people of East Asian descent (Japanese, Chinese and Korean) were more likely to have the vessel reclog during or shortly after the procedure, according to a small study published today in Stroke: Vascular and Interventional Neurology, an open access journal jointly published by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association and the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology.

Blinding Eye Disease Is Strongly Associated With Heart Disease and Stroke

Patients with a specific form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States, are at significant risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke, according to new research from New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai.

Vitamin D Supplements May Offset Bone Loss Caused by Diabetes Drug

Vitamin D supplementation may help offset damaging bone loss that occurs in some people who take canagliflozin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug. Researchers will present their work this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Specific Environmental Exposures may Help Predict Increased Risk of Death from Cardiovascular Disease

A new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai quantifies the cardiovascular risk posed by exposure to specific environmental factors, showing, for example, that air pollution heightens the risk of heart disease mortality by 17 percent.

Heart Failure Patients Unvaccinated Against COVID-19 Are Three Times More Likely to Die From It Than Boosted Heart Failure Patients

EMBARGOED UNTIL JUNE 9, 2022, 10AM EST (New York, NY – June 9, 2022) – Heart failure patients who are unvaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are three times more likely to die if infected with the virus…

Ultrasound-Assisted Laser Technique Vaporizes Artery Plaque #ASA182

Atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque, can lead to heart disease, artery disease, and chronic kidney disease and is traditionally treated by inserting and inflating a balloon to expand the artery. During the 182nd ASA Meeting, Rohit Singh, of the University of Kansas, will present a method that combines a low-power laser with ultrasound to remove arterial plaque safely and efficiently.

Late-Breaking Science Announced for TVT 2022

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) announced that TVT: The Structural Heart Summit will feature 12 studies as Late-Breaking Clinical Science and Featured Clinical Research. An annual meeting covering cutting-edge research and techniques for structural heart interventions, TVT will take place June 8-10, 2022, at the Sheraton Grand Chicago Riverwalk in Chicago, Illinois.

From cavefish to humans: Evolution of metabolism in cavefish may provide insight into treatments for a host of diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke

New research examines how cavefish developed unique metabolic adaptations to survive in nutrient-scarce environments. The study created a genome-wide map of liver tissue for two independent colonies of cavefish along with river fish to understand how cavefish metabolism evolved and how this may be applicable for humans.

TVT 2022 Program Now Available

The program for TVT 2022: The Structural Heart Summit is now available online. An annual meeting from the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TVT features cutting-edge research and techniques for structural heart interventions and will take place June 8-10, 2022 at the Sheraton Grand Chicago Riverwalk in Chicago, Illinois.