Vitamin D Supplements May Offset Bone Loss Caused by Diabetes Drug

Vitamin D supplementation may help offset damaging bone loss that occurs in some people who take canagliflozin, a commonly prescribed diabetes drug. Researchers will present their work this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Specific Environmental Exposures may Help Predict Increased Risk of Death from Cardiovascular Disease

A new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai quantifies the cardiovascular risk posed by exposure to specific environmental factors, showing, for example, that air pollution heightens the risk of heart disease mortality by 17 percent.

Heart Failure Patients Unvaccinated Against COVID-19 Are Three Times More Likely to Die From It Than Boosted Heart Failure Patients

EMBARGOED UNTIL JUNE 9, 2022, 10AM EST (New York, NY – June 9, 2022) – Heart failure patients who are unvaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are three times more likely to die if infected with the virus…

Ultrasound-Assisted Laser Technique Vaporizes Artery Plaque #ASA182

Atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque, can lead to heart disease, artery disease, and chronic kidney disease and is traditionally treated by inserting and inflating a balloon to expand the artery. During the 182nd ASA Meeting, Rohit Singh, of the University of Kansas, will present a method that combines a low-power laser with ultrasound to remove arterial plaque safely and efficiently.

Late-Breaking Science Announced for TVT 2022

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) announced that TVT: The Structural Heart Summit will feature 12 studies as Late-Breaking Clinical Science and Featured Clinical Research. An annual meeting covering cutting-edge research and techniques for structural heart interventions, TVT will take place June 8-10, 2022, at the Sheraton Grand Chicago Riverwalk in Chicago, Illinois.

From cavefish to humans: Evolution of metabolism in cavefish may provide insight into treatments for a host of diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke

New research examines how cavefish developed unique metabolic adaptations to survive in nutrient-scarce environments. The study created a genome-wide map of liver tissue for two independent colonies of cavefish along with river fish to understand how cavefish metabolism evolved and how this may be applicable for humans.

TVT 2022 Program Now Available

The program for TVT 2022: The Structural Heart Summit is now available online. An annual meeting from the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TVT features cutting-edge research and techniques for structural heart interventions and will take place June 8-10, 2022 at the Sheraton Grand Chicago Riverwalk in Chicago, Illinois.

“One-size-fits-all” flawed for assessing cardiovascular disease risk among Asian Americans

In a large, retrospective study covering data from the last two decades, death rates for cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. varied among people from various Asian ethnicity subgroups, with death rate trends that stagnated in some subgroups and increased in others, according to new research published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.

Researchers ID Post-exercise Changes in MicroRNA as Potential Markers for Coronary Artery Disease

Article title: Associations between circulating microRNAs and coronary plaque characteristics: potential impact from physical exercise Authors: Maria Dalen Taraldsen, Rune Wiseth, Vibeke Videm, Anja Bye, Erik Madssen From the authors: “This exploratory study demonstrated six miRs associated with coronary necrotic…

Stress during Pregnancy May Lead to Heart Disease, Accelerated Aging in Next Generation

Prenatal stress can cause damage in the aorta in offspring, which may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and accelerate aging, according to a new study in mice. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Cleveland Clinic-Led Trial Finds That Experimental ‘Gene Silencing’ Therapy Reduces Lipoprotein(a), an Important Risk Factor of Heart Disease, By Up To 98%

Findings from a new Cleveland Clinic-led phase 1 trial show that an experimental “gene silencing” therapy reduced blood levels of lipoprotein(a), a key driver of heart disease risk, by up to 98%.

Findings from the “APOLLO Trial: Magnitude and Duration of Effects of a Short-interfering RNA Targeting Lipoprotein(a): A Placebo-controlled Double-blind Dose-ranging Trial” were presented today during a late-breaking science session at American College of Cardiology’s 71st Annual Scientific Session and simultaneously published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Exercise Improves Health Markers in Young Female Survivors of Childhood Trauma

New research shows a progressive exercise training program mitigates some physiological and psychological effects of adverse childhood experiences in otherwise healthy young women. The study will be presented at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

American Heart Association Honors Two Penn Medicine Scientists for Achievements in Research

Two Penn Medicine faculty members, Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, and Daniel Rader, MD, are being honored with prestigious awards from the American Heart Association (AHA) for their achievements in cardiovascular research. Both awards will be presented during the Presidential Session on Sunday, Nov. 14, at the association’s Scientific Sessions 2021.

CRF Announces Free Online Access to TCT 2021

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the digital component of TCT 2021 will now be free for the entire interventional community. After careful consideration and achieving a critical level of support, CRF’s leadership has agreed to fully support this initiative. Complimentary online registration will include access to all content via livestream during the meeting and on-demand access for one year.

Low-dose Aspirin No Longer Recommended to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

New draft recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend against taking aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes for most people. The Oct. 12, 2021 guidelines are based on new evidence showing that the risks of daily low-dose…

CRF Announces TCT 2021 Late-Breaking Trials and Science

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) has announced 22 late-breaking trial and science presentations that will be reported at TCT 2021. TCT is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. It will take place November 4-6, 2021 in Orlando, Florida at the Orange County Convention Center and simultaneously broadcast live.

‘Leaky’ Heart Valves in Pregnant Women Need More Attention Than Once Thought, Study Suggests

An analysis of more than 20,000 individual medical records suggests that a form of heart valve disease thought to be relatively benign during pregnancy may put women at risk for serious bleeding, high blood pressure, organ damage and other complications during childbirth, according to research from Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Having MS Plus Depression May Be Tied to Increased Risk of Death

Depression is common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and a new study shows that people with both conditions may be more likely to die over the next decade than people with just one or neither condition. The study is published in the September 1, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that people with MS and depression have an increased risk of developing vascular disease such as heart attack and stroke.

Diverse DNA signatures linked to heart disease

Risk for heart disease does not look the same on the genetic level for different population groups, report an international team of researchers this month in the journal JAMA Cardiology. The study, led by Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, begins to outline gene activity patterns that could serve as early warning indicators for cardiovascular disease.

Examining Correlation Between Occupational Noise, Heart Disease

Hearing conservation programs and policies aim to protect workers from noise-induced hearing loss, but it remains unclear whether stress reactions caused by noise exposure might also lead to other negative health outcomes. In The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, researchers describe how data from the Canadian Health Measures Survey do not support an association between loud noise exposure and changes in biomarkers for cardiovascular disease or outcomes.

Muscle Protein That Makes Vertebrates More Fit Linked to Limited Lifespan

Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that a protein called CaMKII improves strength, endurance, muscle health and fitness in young animals. Their experiments working with mice and fruit flies, however, found that the gene for CaMKII also contributes to an evolutionary tradeoff: increased susceptibility to age-associated diseases, frailty and mortality.