Learn CPR and Lower Your Stress: Mount Sinai Cardiologists Emphasize Their Importance During American Heart Month

Doctors warn about lack of knowledge of administering CPR, especially in high-risk groups, and the rise of stress-related heart issues

Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Welcomes Four New Specialists to Department of Cardiology

The Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai welcomes four new specialists to its Department of Cardiology: interventional cardiologist Aakriti Gupta, MD, electrophysiologists Eric Braunstein, MD, and Archana Ramireddy, MD, and adult congenital cardiologist Prashanth Venkatesh, MD.

McCullough honored with 2022 American Heart Association Basic Research Prize

In acknowledgment of her research advancing the field of cardiovascular science, UTHealth Houston’s Louise McCullough, MD, PhD, has been honored with the 2022 American Heart Association Basic Research Prize.

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Named President of Mount Sinai Heart

Mount Sinai Health System’s globally acclaimed cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, has been named President of Mount Sinai Heart, a newly created position, effective Sunday, January 1, 2023. Dr. Fuster will continue in his roles as Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital and as the Richard Gorlin, MD/Heart Research Foundation Professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Seven Hackensack Meridian Health Medical Centers Nationally Recognized for their Commitment to Providing High-Quality Heart Failure Care

Seven Hackensack Meridian Health medical centers have received American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines® – Heart Failure Quality Achievement Awards. The awards recognize the medical centers’ commitment to improving outcomes for patients with heart failure, reducing patient readmissions and providing more healthy days at home.

Initiative Addresses Challenges of Managing Heart Failure

A pilot program at The Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York — designed to help patients manage heart failure after hospital discharge — quickly improved patient adherence to their medication and treatment plan, and resulted in fewer readmissions among the initial 47 patients.

UT Southwestern team wins grand prize in American Heart Association Data Challenge

A team led by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologist Ambarish Pandey, M.D., was awarded the grand prize in the American Heart Association Heart Failure Data Challenge hosted by the American Heart Association and the Association of Black Cardiologists. The six-month data challenge asked researchers to test the relationships between heart failure and health disparities, social determinants of health, and structural determinants of health.

Blacks Found Twice as Likely to Have Atherosclerosis as Hispanics in Young Adult Populations in Underserved Communities

A unique Mount Sinai study focused on a multi-ethnic, underserved community in New York City shows that young Black adults are twice as likely to have atherosclerosis as similarly situated young Hispanic adults.

American Heart Association Honors Two Penn Medicine Scientists for Achievements in Research

Two Penn Medicine faculty members, Kiran Musunuru, MD, PhD, and Daniel Rader, MD, are being honored with prestigious awards from the American Heart Association (AHA) for their achievements in cardiovascular research. Both awards will be presented during the Presidential Session on Sunday, Nov. 14, at the association’s Scientific Sessions 2021.

Mount Sinai Mobile Interventional Stroke Team Travels to Patients, Resulting in Faster Treatment and Better Outcomes

Study finds stroke patients are nearly twice as likely to be functionally independent if treated by a specialized team that travels to them to perform surgical clot removal

Wayne State receives $2.6 million research award from American Heart Association

Black adults have a higher incidence of hypertension (HTN) and a greater risk of HTN-related cardiovascular disease compared to white adults. Even mild elevations in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease; therefore, early interventions for high blood pressure and hypertension are critical to assist in recommendations for lifestyle modification.

Two Mount Sinai Leaders Receive Prestigious Honors from American Heart Association in New York City

Two of Mount Sinai’s top doctors will be honored with prestigious awards at the American Heart Association’s New York City Heart and Stroke Ball, taking place virtually on Wednesday, June 9.

American Heart Month: FSU experts available to comment on heart disease topics

By: Kelsey Klopfenstein | Published: February 3, 2021 | 1:14 pm | SHARE: Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Someone has a heart attack every 39 seconds, and cardiovascular disease claims more lives each year than all forms of cancer combined, according to the American Heart Association’s 2021 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update.

UChicago Medicine receives recognition for resuscitation and stroke care

The American Heart Association has recognized Comer Children’s Hospital with its top honor for resuscitation care of newborns and children, and University of Chicago Medicine with its top honor for stroke care. The awards reflect commitment to high-quality, advanced care for children and adults.

New Research Supports Initial Conservative Management of Stable Coronary Artery Disease

New study results confirm that guideline-directed medical therapy is as effective as more invasive procedures at preventing death, stroke, and heart attack in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).

The study results suggest that guideline-directed medical therapy should be the initial treatment strategy for patients with stable CAD.

The study results validate the evidence-based, guideline-directed, conservative treatment approach that the cardiovascular specialists at Nuvance Health have always used to treat CAD.

15-Year Study Finds Treatment Gaps Exist for Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease; More Consistent Use of Life-Saving Medications Recommended

A new 15-year study by researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found that patients with peripheral arterial disease may not be prescribed life-saving medications at the same rate as for other heart conditions.

Researchers Discover New Mutations in Gene Associated with Disease That Causes Weakening of the Heart

Researchers from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have identified new mutations in a gene commonly associated with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDC), a disease that weakens the heart muscle, making it more difficult to adequately circulate blood to meet the body’s needs.

“Nudging” Heart Patients to Take Their Statins Leads to Better Medication Adherence and Better Patient Outcomes

In a new study presented to heart specialists from around the world, researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found that simple “nudges” in the form of texts, emails and phone calls, not only help patients fill that first statin prescription, but also continue to help them take their medications over the long term.