First time in Thailand – Chula Successfully Uses Stem-cell Transplantation to Treat Systemic Sclerosis Patients with Pulmonary Fibrosis

April 8, 2021 – The Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine (CU Medi), Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, the Thai Red Cross Society (Chulalongkorn Hospital), in collaboration with the Departments of Hematology, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and Infectious diseases, held a press conference on “Thailand’s first successful treatment of systemic sclerosis patients with pulmonary fibrosis by stem cell transplantation“.

National Eye Institute launches data portal for macular degeneration research

The National Eye Institute (NEI) Data Commons now enables researchers to access data from patients with macular degeneration who participated in the Age-related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2). The database complements newly available stem cell lines created by the New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute (NYSCF) from blood cells of AREDS2 study participants.

Potential Target for Treating Many Cancers Found Within GLI1 Gene

Scientists from the Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago found that a region within the DNA of the cancer-promoting GLI1 gene is directly responsible for regulating this gene’s expression. These findings, published in the journal Stem Cells, imply that this region within GLI1 could potentially be targeted as cancer treatment, since turning off GLI1 would interrupt excessive cell division characteristic of cancer.

Scientists Take Important Step Toward Using Retinal Cell Transplants to Treat Blindness

Retinal cells derived from a cadaver human eye survived when transplanted into the eyes of primate models, an important advance in the development of cell therapy to treat blindness, according to a study published on January 14 in Stem Cell Reports.

Girl gets her smile back – and a new jaw – thanks to innovative tissue engineering procedure

Nine-year-old Grace Moss of Laredo, Texas, was facing a daunting prospect. A tumor that had invaded her jaw had been removed, but now the plastic surgeon wanted to remove her fibula – the smaller of the two bones in her lower leg – to use as a graft.

Agricultural Toxicity, Hepatic Effects of Phenobarbital, and More Featured in October 2020 Toxicological Sciences

Toxicological Sciences features leading research biotransformation, toxicokinetics, and pharmacokinetics; computational toxicology and databases; mixtures toxicology; and more in the October 2020 issue.

Image Analysis Technique Provides Better Understanding of Heart Cell Defects

Many patients with heart disease face limited treatment options. Fortunately, stem cell biology has enabled researchers to produce large numbers of cardiomyocytes, which may be used in advanced drug screens and cell-based therapies. However, current image analysis techniques don’t allow researchers to analyze heterogeneous, multidirectional, striated myofibrils typical of immature cells. In the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers showcase an algorithm that combines gradient methods with fast Fourier transforms to quantify myofibril structures in heart cells with considerable accuracy.

Coriell Institute for Medical Research Awarded $8.6 Million Biobanking Contract from National Institute on Aging

The newly awarded $8.6 million funding keeps Coriell in place as the trusted steward of this collection and includes the addition of new innovative products to expand the collection. The NIA Aging Cell Repository was established at Coriell in 1974 and Coriell has continuously managed this unique resource ever since.

Allen Institute for Cell Science Extends Agreement with Coriell Institute for Medical Research

The Allen Institute has extended its contract with the Coriell Institute for Medical Research for the storage and distribution of its Allen Cell Collection, a cutting-edge collection of gene-edited human induced pluripotent stem cell lines. This collection was launched in 2016 with five cell lines, and since has grown to include more than 40 lines. The new agreement will continue this relationship for an additional three years.

Six patients with rare blood disease are doing well after gene therapy clinical trial

UCLA researchers are part of an international team that reported the use of a stem cell gene therapy to treat nine people with the rare, inherited blood disease known as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, or X-CGD. Six of those patients are now in remission and have stopped other treatments. Before now, people with X-CGD – which causes recurrent infections, prolonged hospitalizations for treatment, and a shortened lifespan – had to rely on bone marrow donations for a chance at remission.

Researchers create accurate model of organ scarring using stem cells in a lab

A team led by Dr. Brigitte Gomperts at UCLA has developed a “scar in a dish” model that uses multiple types of cells derived from human stem cells to closely mimic the progressive scarring that occurs in human organs. The researchers used this model to identify a drug candidate that stopped the progression of and even reversed fibrosis in animal models.

New Mayo Clinic studies to be presented at American Society of Hematology meeting

Mayo Clinic researchers will present findings at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting Dec. 7–10 in Orlando.
New Mayo Clinic studies to be presented include:
DNA analysis identifies elevated risk factor for myeloma in individuals of African ancestry
Study identifies more precise assessment measures for patients newly diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Researchers develop method to assess cancer-fighting cell therapy’s effectiveness

Guarding against a devastating tropical disease

Schistosomiasis is one of the most devastating tropical diseases in the world, second only to malaria in its prevalence. The only treatment currently used is extremely limited in its effectiveness and in who it can help. The Newmark Lab wants to develop something that protects people from being infected in the first place.

A Snapshot in Time: Study Captures Fleeting Cell Differences That Can Alter Disease Risk

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called “butterfly effects” in heart muscle cell development, and say this…