Research to Prevent Blindness and Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology Announce 2022 Recipient of RPB David F. Weeks Award for Outstanding Vision Research

Donald Zack, MD, PhD, is recognized for ground-breaking contributions to the field of vision research, funded by Research to Prevent Blindness, an anonymous donor, and the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology.

Audacious projects develop imaging technology to aid eye tissue regeneration

As regenerative therapies for blinding diseases move closer to clinical trials, the National Eye Institute’s functional imaging consortium, a part of the NEI Audacious Goals Initiative (AGI), is pioneering noninvasive technologies to monitor the function of the retina’s light-sensing neurons and their connections to the brain.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Find Mammals Share Gene Pathways That Allow Zebrafish To Grow New Eyes

Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals’ natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. Specifically, the researchers found that some genetic pathways that allow many fish and other cold-blooded animals to repair specialized eye neurons after injury remain present in mammals as well, but are turned off, blocking regeneration and healing.

Scientists Take Important Step Toward Using Retinal Cell Transplants to Treat Blindness

Retinal cells derived from a cadaver human eye survived when transplanted into the eyes of primate models, an important advance in the development of cell therapy to treat blindness, according to a study published on January 14 in Stem Cell Reports.

Focus on Healthy Vision with Six New Year’s Resolutions from Retina Specialists

For many people, the new year means making New Year’s resolutions to improve health and wellness, such as losing weight or getting more sleep. Habits that help support retina health should be top priorities as well, according to the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS).

World’s First ‘Pathoconnectome’ Could Point Toward New Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases

Scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah have achieved another first in the field of connectomics, which studies the synaptic connections between neurons. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded lab has produced the first pathoconnectome, showing how eye disease alters retinal circuitry.

American Society of Retina Specialists Launches Retina Health for Life Podcast

The American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) today announced the launch of a new audio and video podcast series providing consumers with critical information about the signs, symptoms and risk factors of retina disease and the importance of seeing a retina specialist for specialized care.

Low-Carbohydrate Diet May Be Associated With Lower Risk of Blinding Eye Disease

Following a long-term diet that’s low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein from vegetables may lower the risk of the most common subtype of glaucoma

NEI researchers link age-related DNA modifications to susceptibility to eye disease

National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers profiling epigenomic changes in light-sensing mouse photoreceptors have a clearer picture of how age-related eye diseases may be linked to age-related changes in the regulation of gene expression. The findings, published online April 21 in Cell Reports, suggest that the epigenome could be targeted as a therapeutic strategy to prevent leading causes of vision loss, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Breakthrough Technology Used to Discover Eye Damage from Repeated Intravitreal Injections

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Ilana NikraveshMount Sinai Press [email protected] Breakthrough Technology Used to Discover Eye Damage from Repeated Intravitreal Injections Findings may lead to new treatment approaches to counteract this problem (New York, NY – April 13, 2019) – In…

Helper Protein Worsens Diabetic Eye Disease

In a recent study using mice, lab-grown human retinal cells and patient samples, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they found evidence of a new pathway that may contribute to degeneration of the light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. The findings, they conclude, bring scientists a step closer to developing new drugs for a central vision-destroying complication of diabetes that affects an estimated 750,000 Americans.