Mount Sinai scientists discover early signs of frontotemporal dementia in personalized cerebral organoids

Frontotemporal dementias are a group of fatal and debilitating brain disorders for which there are no cures. In an article published July 26 in Cell, Mount Sinai researchers describe how they were able to recreate much of the damage seen in a widely studied form of the disease by growing special types of cerebral organoids in petri dishes.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:
– Study Says Failure to Rid Amyloid Beta Protein from Brain May Lead to Alzheimer’s Disease
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Team Discovers Novel Mediator of Once Mysterious Chronic Itch – Study Suggests Molecular Changes in Tissue Microenvironment May Promote Colorectal Cancer
– Researchers ID Anti-Inflammatory Proteins as Therapy Targets for Nasal and Sinus Problem
– Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Receives NIH Award to Study Dangerous Pediatric Disease

Human Lung and Brain Organoids Respond Differently to SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Lab Tests

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers are using stem cell-derived organoids to study how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with various organ systems. Their findings may help explain the wide variety in COVID-19 symptoms and aid the search for therapies.

Synthetic Biology and Machine Learning Speed the Creation of Lab-Grown Livers

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have combined synthetic biology with a machine learning algorithm to create human liver organoids with blood and bile handling systems. When implanted into mice with failing livers, the lab-grown replacement livers extended life.

Rutgers Cancer Institute Researchers Utilize 4D Printing with Patient Derived Organoids to Accelerate Treatment Testing for Common Brain Tumor

Rutgers Cancer Institute investigator shares about a new project in which 4-dimensional (4D) printing of arrays that transform from cell-culture inserts into histological cassettes are utilized and hold patient tissue samples for rapid programmable drug testing to accelerate treatment testing for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a common brain tumor.

Human Gut-in-a-Dish Model Helps Define ‘Leaky Gut,’ and Outline a Pathway to Treatment

UC San Diego researchers use 3D human gut organoids to reveal the molecular system that keeps intestinal linings sealed, demonstrate how the system breaks down and how it can be strengthened with the diabetes drug metformin.

Brain Organoids Reveal Glioblastoma Origins

Glioblastomas are the most aggressive form of brain cancer – they grow and spread rapidly through the brain and are virtually impossible to eradicate, typically leading to death within one or two years of diagnosis. Scientists are constantly seeking more powerful targeted therapies, but so far without success — in part because glioblastomas are challenging to study in a laboratory setting.