New Model May Help Us Better Understand Cancer-Related Disability in Humans

A novel preclinical mouse model of pancreatic cancer may promote better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to disability in human cancer patients, according to the findings of a new study presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting.

Virginia Tech, partners launch nation’s first pediatric rehabilitation resource center

Research partners across three institutions are opening the nation’s first and only resource center dedicated to promoting clinical trials research in the rapidly expanding field of pediatric rehabilitation. It will be one of a network six centers under the umbrella of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, part of the National Institutes of Health, with direct oversight from the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research.

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Receives $4.3M Grant to Launch National Center to Improve Care for People with Disabilities

Through a $4.3 million grant, the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) will become a national center dedicated to improving health and function of people with disabilities and their caregivers.

Heat Stress May Affect More Than 1.2 Billion People Annually by 2100

Heat stress from extreme heat and humidity will annually affect areas now home to 1.2 billion people by 2100, assuming current greenhouse gas emissions, according to a Rutgers study. That’s more than four times the number of people affected today, and more than 12 times the number who would have been affected without industrial era global warming.

Validating NIH Toolbox to help evaluate cognitive processing in people with intellectual disability

Cognitive processing in people with intellectual disability can now be accurately assessed thanks to UC Davis Health researchers who updated and validated series of tests, part of the NIH Toolbox Cognitive Battery.

More medical students are telling their schools about their disabilities, and schools are responding, study finds

The percentage of medical students who told their schools that they have a disability rose sharply in recent years, a new study shows. Medical schools made changes, called accommodations, for nearly all medical students who disclosed the fact that they have a condition that qualifies as a disability, the study also finds.