New Analysis: More U.S. Adults Identify as Disabled; Ethnic and Socioeconomic Disparities Persist

A new analysis led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers finds that the number of U.S. adults who report they have a disability is 27%, representing 67 million adults, an increase of 1% since the data were last analyzed in 2016. In this new study, which used data collected in 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic, the researchers found a wide array of disparities between socioeconomic and demographic factors that persists among those who identify as disabled and those who do not.

Chula Unveils World-Class Innovative Prosthesis Made by Thais

April 9, 2021 – Chula holds the 4th CHULA the Impact Seminar entitled “World–Class Innovative Prosthesis Made by Thais” showcasing the capabilities of Chula researchers from Chula Engineering Enterprises

Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

PREGNANT AFTER THE FIRST DOSE OF COVID-19 VACCINE — NOW WHAT?
STUDY SHOWS VACCINES MAY PROTECT AGAINST NEW COVID-19 STRAINS … AND MAYBE THE COMMON COLD
EXPANDED DASHBOARD TOOL RANKS ACCESSIBILITY OF STATE VACCINE WEBSITES

Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit Awarded $39.5 Million USAID Grant to Lead Global Initiative on Strengthening Health Systems for Rehabilitation

The Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has received a $39.5 million grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to strengthen rehabilitation services in low- and middle-income countries.

Baylor Scott & White Health Earns Best Place to Work in 2020 Disability Equality Index®

Baylor Scott & White Health has been recognized in the 2020 Disability Equality Index (DEI), a joint initiative of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) and Disability:IN as a “Best Places to Work for Disability Inclusion.”

UTEP Study Examines COVID-19 Stress, Coping Strategies, and Well-Being

Emre Umucu, Ph.D., assistant professor of rehabilitation counseling at The University of Texas at El Paso, and Beatrice Lee, an incoming rehabilitation counseling faculty member, examined the perceived stress levels and coping mechanisms related to COVID-19, and how coping affects well-being in people with self-reported chronic conditions and disabilities.

Autism severity can change substantially during early childhood

A UC Davis MIND Institute study found that around 30% of young children with autism have less severe autism symptoms at age 6 than they did at age 3, with some losing their autism diagnoses entirely. It also found that girls tend to show greater reduction and less rise in their autism symptom severity than boys with autism. Children with higher IQs were more likely to show a reduction in their symptoms.

Studies Show Number of U.S. Medical Students With Disabilities Grows, But Disparities Continue

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that the number of disabled students admitted to U.S. medical schools rose from 2.9% to 4.9% over the last three years. However, the percentage of NIH-funded researchers with disabilities declined between 2008 and 2018. The grant success rate for this group was lower than for researchers without a disability, indicating that despite more people with disabilities prepared to enter biomedical research, their prospects as professionals are weakening.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Autism and Transportation Issues

New Brunswick, N.J. (Jan. 22, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick expert Cecilia Feeley is available for interviews on transportation and mobility issues for people on the autism spectrum. Feeley, transportation autism project manager at the Rutgers Center for Advanced Infrastructure and…

Moderate to Heavy Drinking During Pregnancy Alters Genes in Newborns, Mothers

Mothers who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol during pregnancy may be changing their babies’ DNA, according to a Rutgers-led study.