3D-Printed Chip Sensor Detects Foodborne Pathogens for Safer Products

In AIP Advances, researchers have developed a new method for detecting foodborne pathogens that is faster, cheaper, and more effective than existing methods. Their microfluidic chip uses light to detect multiple types of pathogens simultaneously and is created using 3D printing, making it easy to fabricate in large amounts and modify to target specific pathogens.

From lab to life: 3D bioprinting unveils new horizons in biomedical applications

A cutting-edge review explores the convergence of three-dimensional (3D) printing and peptide self-assembly, unveiling a new era in biomanufacturing. This technology paves the way for creating sophisticated biomaterials, advancing the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Chameleons inspire new multicolor 3D-printing technology

Inspired by the color-changing ability of chameleons, researchers developed a sustainable technique to 3D-print multiple, dynamic colors from a single ink. “By designing new chemistries and printing processes, we can modulate structural color on the fly to produce color gradients…

A Cocktail Party of 3D-Printed Robot Heads #ASA184

Imagine a cocktail party full of 3D-printed, humanoid robots listening and talking to each other. That seemingly sci-fi scene is the goal of the Augmented Listening Laboratory at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. With precise control over the simulated subjects, the researchers can adjust the parameters of the experiment and even set the machines in motion to simulate neck movements. They will describe the talking human head simulators, and their work investigating how humans receive sound and developing audio technology, at the 184th ASA Meeting.

NUS scientists develop plant-based cell culture scaffold for cheaper, more sustainable cultured meat

A research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has successfully used common plant proteins to 3D-print an edible cell culture scaffold, allowing more affordable and sustainable lab-grown meat to be served on the table.

Cell culture scaffolds are typically made from synthetic or animal-based materials, which are either too expensive or inedible. In search of an alternative, the team led by Professor Huang Dejian, Deputy Head of the NUS Department of Food Science and Technology, turned to plant proteins, which are known to be biodegradable and biocompatible with animal cells. Crucially, plant proteins also satisfy common requirements for food consumption, making the resulting scaffold fit for culturing meat.

A Recipe for 3D-Printing Food

Additive manufacturing of food involves designing, pre-processing, manufacturing, and post-processing, and each step is an opportunity to create innovative foods. In Physics of Fluids, researchers identify factors that affect the print quality and shape complexity of the food created. For example, changing the printing patterns and ingredients of the initial mix or paste can affect the food’s matrix and microstructures and therefore its texture. Accounting for these features can increase food quality, improve control, and speed up printing.

VULCAN forges new science for the future of 3D-printed metal

Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers have developed a novel experimental platform called OpeN-AM to study additively manufactured metal in real time using beams of neutrons. The experimental system features a robotic arm that 3D-prints metal welds to create complex shapes and objects.

Joining Forces: Fast-as-lightning 3D Microprinting with Two Lasers

Printing objects from plastic precisely, quickly, and inexpensively is the goal of many 3D printing processes. However, speed and high resolution remain a technological challenge. A research team from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Heidelberg University, and the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) has come a long way toward achieving this goal. It developed a laser printing process that can print micrometer-sized parts in the blink of an eye. The international team published the work in Nature Photonics. (DOI: 10.1038/s41566-022-01081-0)

Print, Recycle, Repeat: Scientists Demonstrate a Biodegradable Printed Circuit

Scientists have developed a fully recyclable and biodegradable printed circuit. The advance could divert wearable devices and other flexible electronics from landfill, and mitigate the health and environmental hazards posed by heavy metal waste.

Pitt is the only university in the U.S. with this giant 3D printer for metal

The University of Pittsburgh is in exclusive company with a new state-of-the-art technology — the first Gefertec arc605 3D printer at any university in the U.S, thanks to funding from the Department of Energy and U.S. Army. The printer makes use of welding, melting wire made from metals like stainless steel, titanium and aluminum alloys and depositing it layer by layer. Pitt’s new Gefertec arc605 is much faster than previous metal 3D printers, which used lasers and metal powder.

Study: Making an artificial heart fit for a human — with focused rotary jet spinning, not 3D

In a new study published in Science, a team of researchers from Harvard, University of Pittsburgh, University of California, Irvine and University of Zurich have come together to utilize a new, more advanced method to fabricate artificial tissues and organs. The researchers proposed the process of focused rotary jet spinning. This team included Qihan Liu, an assistant professor in the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering.

Closed-loop additive manufacturing fueled by upcycled plastic

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed an upcycling approach that adds value to discarded plastics for reuse in additive manufacturing, or 3D printing. The readily adoptable, scalable method introduces a closed-loop strategy that could globally reduce plastic waste and cut carbon emissions tied to plastic production.

NASA funds LLNL to demonstrate “Replicator” 3D printer to produce cartilage in space

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announced April 15 it has awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and a private company with funding to develop LLNL’s revolutionary volumetric additive manufacturing (VAM) 3D printing technology to produce artificial cartilage tissue in space.

Pain in the Neck? New Surgical Method Could be Game-changing

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is widely used to treat spinal disorders. The fusion involves placing a bone graft or “cage” and/or implants where the surgically removed damaged disc was originally located to stabilize and strengthen the area. The risk factors for cage migration are multifactorial and include patient, radiological characteristics, surgical techniques and postoperative factors. A study is the first to evaluate the effect of the range of motion, cage migration and penetration using variable angle screws and cervical spine models. The plate developed and tested by the researchers provided directional stability and excellent fusion, showing promising clinical outcomes for patients with degenerative cervical spine disease.

Now We’re Cooking with Lasers

Imagine having your own digital personal chef; ready to cook whatever you want, tailoring the shape, texture, and flavor just for you–all at the push of a button. Columbia engineers have been working on doing just that, using lasers for cooking and 3D printing technology for assembling foods. In their new study they discovered that laser-cooked meat shrinks 50% less, retains double the moisture content, and shows similar flavor development to conventionally cooked meat.

Nuclear reactor components 3D printed by ORNL now installed at TVA Browns Ferry nuclear plant

Four first-of-a-kind 3D-printed fuel assembly brackets, produced at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have been installed and are now under routine operating conditions at the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 2 in Athens, Alabama.

Story tips: Sensing oil leaks, 3D prints in space, more fuel from ethanol, Arctic modeling boost, making isotopes faster and nano-enabled microscopy

Story tips: Sensing oil leaks, 3D prints in space, more fuel from ethanol, Arctic modeling boost, making isotopes faster and nano-enabled microscopy

LLNL optimizes flow-through electrodes for electrochemical reactors with 3D printing

To take advantage of the growing abundance and cheaper costs of renewable energy, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers are 3D printing flow-through electrodes (FTEs), core components of electrochemical reactors used for converting CO2 and other molecules to useful products.

Taking cues from nature, breakthrough ‘cellular fluidics’ technology could have sweeping impacts

Inspired by the way plants absorb and distribute water and nutrients, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have developed a groundbreaking method for transporting liquids and gases using 3D-printed lattice design and capillary action phenomena.

CU VET’s “3D Dog Eye Anatomy Model for Self Learning” Wins a Gold Medal at IWA 2020, Morocco

The 3D Dog Eye Anatomy Model for Self–learning, an innovation by the Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University (CU VET) recently received the Gold Award at the International Innovation Week Africa (IWA) 2020 in Rabat, Morocco.

Chula Unveils World-Class Innovative Prosthesis Made by Thais

April 9, 2021 – Chula holds the 4th CHULA the Impact Seminar entitled “World–Class Innovative Prosthesis Made by Thais” showcasing the capabilities of Chula researchers from Chula Engineering Enterprises