Tracking melting points above 4000 degrees Celsius

A materials engineer at the University of California San Diego is leading the development of a new research platform for studying high-performance materials, in particular new materials that melt above 4000 degrees Celsius (C). UC San Diego nanoengineering professor Kenneth Vecchio is leading the project, which is funded by a new $800,000 grant from the US Office of Naval Research (ONR), through the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP).

Missouri S&T among winners in NASA’s BIG Idea Challenge

The success of NASA’s future plans to explore and inhabit the moon may depend in part on research by university students, including a team of seven from Missouri University of Science and Technology who have won a grant from the space agency to develop a way to remove lunar dust from power-producing solar cells.The Missouri S&T team is one of seven university-affiliated groups to be selected for funding through NASA’s Breakthrough, Innovative and Game-changing (BIG) Idea Challenge.

Rotating Detonation Engine test-fired for first time at UAH’s Johnson Research Center

A Rotating Detonation Engine (RDE) has been test-fired for the first time at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a part of the University of Alabama System. RDEs are a tantalizing engineering concept that could be transformative for rocket propulsion

DOE-funded UAH directed plasma research may advance pulsed fusion propulsion systems

A professor at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has been awarded a one-year, $98,930 grant by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for plasma research that could advance pulsed fusion propulsion for spacecraft.

Bone breakthrough may lead to more durable airplane wings

Cornell researchers have made a new discovery about how seemingly minor aspects of the internal structure of bone can be strengthened to withstand repeated wear and tear, a finding that could help treat patients suffering from osteoporosis. It could also lead to the creation of more durable, lightweight materials for the aerospace industry.

Aerospace engineer receives grant to make origami structures in space

Xin Ning, assistant professor of aerospace engineering at Penn State, is applying the ancient folding art of origami to reconfigurable, multifunctional materials that could be used to build structures in harsh environments, such as outer space. His work was recently recognized by the Applied Mechanics Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

From Immigration Battle to Outer Space, Rutgers Student Makes Long Journey

Becoming an astronaut is challenging for anyone, but for School of Engineering senior Marissa Navarro, that dream was complicated by an eight-year fight to stay in the United States. Find out how she got the attention of NASA’s Mars 2020 deputy surface phase lead, Diana Trujillo, and how she is one step closer to reaching her goal of becoming an astronaut someday.