Newly Approved Lupus Drug Based on Discoveries Made in HSS Lab

The US Food and Drug Administration approved the drug anifrolumab (Saphnelo) on August 2, 2021 for the treatment of adult patients with moderate to severe systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are receiving standard therapy. Much of the groundwork for the development of this drug was done in laboratories at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in the early 2000s.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Helping Childhood-Onset Lupus Patients Stay Healthy As Adults

DALLAS – March 30, 2021 – UT Southwestern researchers have identified factors that put patients with childhood-onset lupus at elevated risk for poor outcomes, such as end-stage renal disease or death, as they transition from pediatric to adult health care. The findings, published online in Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, emphasize the precarious nature of this period and shine a spotlight on areas prime for intervention to help protect these vulnerable patients.

Black Patients with Lupus Have Three Times Higher Risk of Stroke, 24 Times Higher Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease

New research reveals that, in the U.S., Black patients with lupus have a threefold higher risk of stroke and a 24-fold higher risk of ischemic heart disease. The study also found several lupus-specific symptoms that predict stroke and IHD in these patients. Details of the study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Many with Lupus at High Risk for Adverse Reactions to Pneumocystis Pneumonia Preventive Drug

New research shows that adults with systemic lupus erythematosus, who receive trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) are at high risk for adverse reactions to the drug, particularly if they are also positive for anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibodies. Details of the study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Hydroxychloroquine Not Linked to Longer Heart Rhythm Intervals in Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus Patients

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, discovers that use of hydroxychloroquine does not cause any significant differences in QTc length or prolonged QTc in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

‘Incredibly generous’ $25 million donation to create the Schroeder Arthritis Institute at UHN, consolidating research, education and patient care under one global brand

One in five Canadian adults is currently living with arthritis, a disease causing inflammation of the joints, which can result in chronic, debilitating pain, reduced mobility and premature disability. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability globally. To address this growing crisis, the Schroeder Arthritis Institute, launched with a $25 million donation by philanthropists Walter and Maria Schroeder, will help UHN’s innovative arthritis program become a world-class hub for innovation in research, education and patient care.

American College of Rheumatology Secures $7M Grant to Address Gaps in Lupus Care and Treatment

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) was recently awarded a $7M grant to reduce inequities in symptom recognition, care and disease management of systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). The grant, which will be led by the ACR’s Collaborative Initiatives (COIN) department, begins on Sept. 30.

“My Disease May Be Invisible, But I’m Not”: Patients Tell Their Stories During Rheumatic Disease Awareness Month

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and Simple Tasks™ will recognize the fifth annual Rheumatic Disease Awareness Month (RDAM) this September with an awareness campaign that focuses on amplifying patient voices and experiences.

New study: Hydroxychloroquine ineffective as a preventive antiviral against COVID-19

esearchers at Case Western Reserve University have added to the growing body of understanding about how hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is not a possible defense against COVID-19.
Specifically, they found that HCQ is not effective in preventing COVID-19 in patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting a broader interpretation of HCQ as ineffective preventive medicine for the general population. Their findings were recently published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

Prominent Rheumatologist to Create Scleroderma Program at Kao Institute

Nationally recognized rheumatology expert Francesco Boin, MD, has been appointed director of the division of Rheumatology and director of the new Scleroderma Program at Cedars-Sinai. Boin is an accomplished and widely published investigator of autoimmune diseases, with a reputation for clinical excellence and a multidisciplinary approach to patient care.

First Do No Harm – Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19

Researchers urge a moratorium on prescribing chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, with or without azithromycin, to treat or prevent COVID-19, and caution that the reassuring safety profile of hydroxychloroquine may be more apparent than real. Safety data derive from decades of prescriptions by clinicians, primarily for their patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, both of which are of greater prevalence in younger and middle age women, who are at very low risk of fatal heart outcomes due to hydroxychloroquine.

HOW TO REDUCE FLARES IF YOU HAVE LUPUS

Medications for lupus — a long-term autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s immune system attacks different parts of their body, including their skin — are currently being explored as a treatment for COVID-19 patients. This may significantly limit access to the drugs by those who depend on it to manage their health conditions.

Cedars-Sinai Receives $20M to Create Kao Autoimmunity Institute

Cedars-Sinai today announced a $20 million gift from Dr. and Mrs. Min H. Kao and the Kao Family Foundation to create the Kao Autoimmunity Institute to advance research and treatment of rheumatologic diseases. The gift also will establish the Scleroderma Program within the institute to provide interdisciplinary and integrated care for scleroderma patients and to support research, outreach, training and education to help those with the disease.