Higher Doses and Longer Use of Hydroxychloroquine Increase Risk of Severe Eye Complication

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, shows that higher doses, longer duration of use, chronic kidney disease and Asian race could all be risk factors for retinopathy in people using hydroxychloroquine for rheumatoid arthritis.

NYU Langone Presentations at American College of Rheumatology Convergence 2021 to Address Vaccine Efficacy and High-risk Pregnancy

NYU Langone rheumatologists are presenting their discoveries at the annual American College of Rheumatology conference, November 1 to November 9. The conference will be held virtually.

Hydroxychloroquine Has No Significant Impact on Heart Rhythm in Lupus Patients, Even Those with Chronic Kidney Disease

New research shows that adults with lupus who take hydroxychloroquine do not have any differences in their corrected QT (QTc) intervals even if they have chronic kidney disease. The study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College Rheumatology’s annual meeting.

Hydroxychloroquine Not Linked to Longer Heart Rhythm Intervals in Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lupus Patients

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, discovers that use of hydroxychloroquine does not cause any significant differences in QTc length or prolonged QTc in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

New study: Hydroxychloroquine ineffective as a preventive antiviral against COVID-19

esearchers at Case Western Reserve University have added to the growing body of understanding about how hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is not a possible defense against COVID-19.
Specifically, they found that HCQ is not effective in preventing COVID-19 in patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting a broader interpretation of HCQ as ineffective preventive medicine for the general population. Their findings were recently published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

Recently, several physicians hosted a press conference in which one physician claimed that the combination of hydroxychloroquine, the antibiotic azithromycin and the mineral zinc could cure COVID-19. The video footage of that press conference went viral on social media, and soon many social media platforms removed the videos for providing inaccurate, non-scientifically backed claims. But questions from the public may still remain.

First Do No Harm – Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19

Researchers urge a moratorium on prescribing chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, with or without azithromycin, to treat or prevent COVID-19, and caution that the reassuring safety profile of hydroxychloroquine may be more apparent than real. Safety data derive from decades of prescriptions by clinicians, primarily for their patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, both of which are of greater prevalence in younger and middle age women, who are at very low risk of fatal heart outcomes due to hydroxychloroquine.

Study Shows Hydroxychloroquine’s Harmful Effects on Heart Rhythm

The malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, which has been promoted as a potential treatment for Covid-19, is known to have potentially serious effects on heart rhythms. Now, a team of researchers has used an optical mapping system to observe exactly how the drug creates serious disturbances in the electrical signals that govern heartbeat.

During Virtual Hill Visits, Rheumatology Leaders Urge Lawmakers to Provide Targeted COVID-19 Relief for Healthcare Practices

In virtual meetings with lawmakers and on Twitter tomorrow, physician and health professional leaders from the American College of Rheumatology are sounding the alarm about the economic impact of COVID-19 on rheumatology practices and the urgent need for targeted relief to help specialty practices remain solvent and continue to serve patients.

Larger study to test combination treatment for COVID-19

A study is now enrolling participants to determine whether a treatment combining a low dose of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin can prevent hospitalization and death in people with COVID-19.

Dr. Ann Collier, professor of medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the University of Washington School of Medicine, explains the national study is looking to enroll 2,000 patients at sites across the country.

Researchers enrolling COVID-19 patients for treatment trial

Researchers are now enrolling outpatients with COVID-19 for a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of two drug regimens – hydroxychloroquine and hydroxychloroquine with azithromycin.

There is conflicting evidence on whether it works, which is why the research team at the University of Washington School of Medicine is conducting a rigorous trial to offer answers.

Baylor Scott & White Research Institute Exploring Potential Prevention Options, Therapies for COVID-19

Baylor Scott & White Research Institute, the research arm of Baylor Scott & White Health, is bringing clinical trials online at an unprecedented pace in response to COVID-19. A COVID-19 therapeutic task force of more than 20 multidisciplinary researchers positioned across the state of Texas has been putting their expertise in infectious disease, cardiology, immunology, molecular biology, and other specialties together to explore research opportunities for experimental prevention and treatment options and to develop investigator-initiated studies.

HOW TO REDUCE FLARES IF YOU HAVE LUPUS

Medications for lupus — a long-term autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s immune system attacks different parts of their body, including their skin — are currently being explored as a treatment for COVID-19 patients. This may significantly limit access to the drugs by those who depend on it to manage their health conditions.

UNC Health Workers Called to Join National PCORnet® Study to Fight COVID-19

The Healthcare Worker Exposure Response & Outcomes (HERO) Registry launched this week, inviting U.S. health care workers to share clinical and life experiences in order to understand the perspectives and problems faced by those on the COVID-19 pandemic front lines.

Two Major COVID-19 Clinical Trials Launched to Determine Effectiveness and Safety of Drugs in Treating Coronavirus

Researchers from Intermountain Healthcare and University of Utah Health in Salt Lake City have launched two vital clinical trials to test the effectiveness and safety of two drugs – hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and azithromycin – to treat patients with COVID-19.

UPMC Leads Global Effort to Fast Track Testing of Hydroxychloroquine and other COVID-19 Therapies with ‘Learning While Doing’ Clinical Trial

Novel ‘learning while doing’ clinical trial approach called REMAP helps doctors find the optimal trade-off between quickly adopting new therapies during a pandemic, such as the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine, and waiting until they are tested in longer clinical trials. The trial announced today at UPMC, called UPMC-REMAP-COVID19 learns from similar trials enrolling around the world and uses artificial intelligence to quickly arrive at answers.

Clinical trial launches to evaluate antimalarial drugs for COVID-19 treatment

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is launching a clinical trial for patients hospitalized with COVID-19 at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. The trial will investigate the effectiveness of different combinations of the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin in treating ill patients infected with the novel coronavirus.

University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare Launch Two COVID-19 Clinical Trials to Test Effectiveness of Drugs

Researchers from Intermountain Healthcare and University of Utah Health in Salt Lake City have launched two vital clinical trials to test the effectiveness and safety of two drugs –hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and azithromycin – to treat patients with COVID-19 (infection with the novel coronavirus).