FSU researchers develop thin heat shield for superfast aircraft

The world of aerospace increasingly relies on carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites to build the structures of satellites, rockets and jet aircraft. But the life of those materials is limited by how they handle heat. A team of FAMU-FSU College of Engineering researchers from Florida State University’s High-Performance Materials Institute is developing a design for a heat shield that better protects those extremely fast machines.

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Machine learning analyses help unlock secrets of stable ‘supercrystal’

By blasting a frustrated mixture of materials with quick pulses of laser light, researchers transformed a superlattice into a supercrystal, a rare, repeating, three-dimensional structural much larger than an ordinary crystal. Using machine learning techniques, they studied the underlying structure of this sample at the nanoscale level before and after applying the laser pulse treatment.

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Go With the Flow: Scientists Design New Grid Batteries for Renewable Energy

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have designed an affordable ‘flow battery’ membrane that could accelerate renewable energy for the electrical grid.

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Stitching It All Together

The future of materials science covers a smorgasbord of applications: batteries that self-repair, wind turbines robust enough to withstand the extreme forces put on them, or long-lasting devices that only require replacing small parts every so often. Before getting to these applications, these basic science questions need to be answered. These questions are one reason the Department of Energy (DOE) supports research in this area at universities and national laboratories around the country.

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World-Leading Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atoms in Their ‘Neighborhoods’

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have demonstrated how a powerful electron microscopy technique can provide direct insight into the performance of any material – from strong metallic glass to flexible semiconducting films – by pinpointing specific atomic “neighborhoods.”

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Living on the Edge: How a 2D Material Got Its Shape

A team of scientists led by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has gained valuable insight into 3D transition metal oxide nanoparticles’ natural “edge” for 2D growth.

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Investigating Materials that Can Go the Distance in Fusion Reactors

Future fusion reactors will require materials that can withstand extreme operating conditions, including being bombarded by high-energy neutrons at high temperatures. Scientists recently irradiated titanium diboride (TiB2) in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to better understand the effects of fusion neutrons on performance.

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Markus J. Buehler, McAfee Professor of Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), joins MRS Bulletin as new Editor focused on Original Research

MRS Bulletin is pleased to announce the appointment of Markus J. Buehler, McAfee Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), as editor of the new MRS Bulletin Impact section. In this new position, Buehler will partner with MRS Bulletin Editor Gopal R. Rao and his team to launch and develop an important new section of the journal focused on publishing high-impact original research articles, complemented by review articles and a strong set of editorial content. His tenure begins October 1.

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Even Hard Materials Have Soft Spots

The Achilles Heel of “metallic glasses” is that while they are strong materials—even stronger than conventional steels—they are also very brittle. The initial failures tend to be localized and catastrophic. This is due to their random amorphous (versus ordered crystalline) atomic structure. Computer simulations revealed that the structure is not completely random, however, and that there are some regions in the structure that are relatively weak. Defects nucleate more easily in these regions, which can lead to failure. This understanding of the mechanical properties has led to a strategy for making the material stronger and less brittle.

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