Nikhil Tiwale: Practicing the Art of Nanofabrication

Applying his passions for science and art, Nikhil Tiwale—a postdoc at Brookhaven Lab’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials—is fabricating new microelectronics components.

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Cartoon Network and Cyberbullying Research Center Release First-Ever National Research Findings on Cyberbullying Among Tweens

A survey of 1,034 tweens found that one in five (21%) tweens have experienced cyberbullying in some way: either by witnessing cyberbullying (15%), having been cyberbullied themselves (15%), or by cyberbullying others (3%). The survey also found that during the coronavirus pandemic, 90% of all 9- to 12-year-olds are using social apps, such as connected games and video-sharing sites in which they interact with others online.

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Quantum Materials Quest Could Benefit From Graphene That Buckles

Graphene, an extremely thin two-dimensional layer of the graphite used in pencils, buckles when cooled while attached to a flat surface, resulting in beautiful pucker patterns that could benefit the search for novel quantum materials and superconductors, according to Rutgers-led research in the journal Nature. Quantum materials host strongly interacting electrons with special properties, such as entangled trajectories, that could provide building blocks for super-fast quantum computers. They also can become superconductors that could slash energy consumption by making power transmission and electronic devices more efficient.

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Two Steps Closer to Flexible, Powerful, Fast Bioelectronic Devices

Led by Biomedical Engineering Prof Dion Khodagholy, researchers have designed biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material. These have promise for bioelectronic devices that are fast, sensitive, biocompatible, soft, and flexible, with long-term stability in physiological environments such as the human body. In particular, they could facilitate diagnosis and monitoring of neurological disease.

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Improving Optical Characteristics of Thin Glass

In recent years, glass has become an important part of our day-to-day lives, acting as a physical boundary between humans and digital information and communication. At the AVS 66th International Symposium and Exhibition, Albert Fahey, an associate scientist at Corning Incorporated, will present on the methods scientists use to study the chemical and mechanical properties of glass and other optical surfaces, how they are working to better understand these surfaces and their limits, and what new things are being done to improve user friendliness.

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