Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss the Mental Health Impacts of Social Media on Children

A Rutgers child and adult psychiatrist, Muhammad Zeshan, M.D., is available to discuss the negative impacts of social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter on teenagers. “I’ve seen the negative psychological impacts of social media, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic…

FAU Receives NOAA Grant to Assess Shark Interactions with Recreational Fishing

Shark depredation, where a shark partially or completely consumes a fish before a fisherman can get it out of the water, causes a range of negative biological and economic impacts. Scientists have found a novel way to address this issue using a citizen-science approach that includes surveys, videos, forensics and social media.

New Research Analyzes Millions of Twitter Posts During Hurricanes to Understand How People Communicate in a Disaster

In the face of a potentially disastrous storm like Hurricane Ida, people take to Twitter and other social media sites to communicate vital information. New research published in the journal Risk Analysis suggests that monitoring and analyzing this social media “chatter” during a natural disaster could help decision makers learn how to plan for and mitigate the impacts of severe weather events in their communities.

As COVID-19 and Online Misinformation Spread, Children and Teens Were Poisoned with Hand Sanitizer and Alcoholic Drinks

During the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, as false health information spread on social media, the number of children and teens poisoned with hand sanitizer or alcoholic beverages surged in Iran. These poisonings resulted in hundreds of hospitalizations and 22 deaths. Misinformation circulating on social media included the false suggestion that consuming alcohol (methanol) or hand sanitizer (ethanol or isopropyl alcohol) protected against COVID-19 infection (it does not). A major alcohol poisoning outbreak sickened nearly 6,000 Iranian adults, of whom 800 died. It was not known, however, to what extent children and adolescents were affected. For the study in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, investigators compared pediatric hospitalizations for ethanol and methanol poisoning during the early COVID-19 pandemic in Iran with the same period the previous year. They also looked at types of exposure and how those were linked to the children’s ages and clinical outcomes.

Stressed Teens Benefit from Coping Online, but a Little Goes a Long Way

An adolescent’s day can be filled with a dizzying array of digital technologies. For many teenagers, being online is a way to pass the time and communicate with friends. Cell phones and social media can also help teens cope with stressful events—as long as they strike the right balance between spending time online and pursuing other coping activities.

Politicians in areas with most climate risk tweet about it least

Politicians are more likely to tweet about climate change if they are Democrats, represent wealthier districts and if their constituents are concerned about the climate, according to a new Cornell University study. Meanwhile, communities most at risk from climate change are less likely to see their political leaders tweet about it, the multidisciplinary team of researchers said.

Study shows users banned from social platforms go elsewhere with increased toxicity

Users banned from social platforms go elsewhere with increased toxicity, according to a new study featuring researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

FAU Invention for Maximum Privacy of Sharing Files Online Gets U.S. Patent

While services such as Snapchat allow self-destructing messages or notify users when a recipient takes a screenshot of a message, there is no way to prevent someone from photographing or showing it to others on the screen. A new invention controls how and when shared documents are displayed and restricts individuals from viewing documents based on individual identity (e.g., face ID, a voice sample), their social network, and when and where the document is being viewed.

New Data Analysis of U.S. ‘Oligopoly Problem’ Reaffirms Antitrust Push: UMD Economist

A new study on U.S. oligopolies uses, according to its author, a “groundbreaking model” to more accurately measure competition in U.S. markets and the consequences for consumers “who are capturing a smaller slice of a shrinking pie.” Bruno Pellegrino, author of the working paper recently cited by…

Invention: The Storywrangler

Scientists have invented a first-of-its-kind instrument to peer deeply into billions of Twitter posts–providing an unprecedented, minute-by-minute view of popularity, from rising political movements, to K-pop, to emerging diseases. The tool–called the Storywrangler–gathers phrases across 150 different languages, analyzing the rise and fall of ideas and stories, each day, among people around the world. The Storywrangler quantifies collective attention.

The End of the Antitrust Case Against Facebook? Expert from Robert H. Smith School of Business available to discuss the ruling against the FTC and states.

David Kass, clinical professor of finance Kass has served as an economist in senior positions with the Federal Trade Commission, General Accounting Office, Department of Defense, and the Bureau of Economic Analysis. He also is active on Twitter (@DrDavidKass) and blogs about Warren Buffett,…

Media Law, Communication, and Free Speech Expert Comments on Supreme Court Ruling on a Student’s Profane Rant

Jason Shepard, professor of Communications at California State University, Fullerton, specializes in media law and is available to comment on this morning’s 8-1 U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the free speech of a high school cheerleader who posted a profane rant on Snapchat in 2017.

PNNL AI Expert Harnesses Open-Source Data to Understand Human Behavior

PNNL researchers used natural language processing and deep learning techniques to reveal how and why different types of misinformation and disinformation spread across social platforms. Applied to COVID-19, the team found that misinformation intended to influence politics and incite fear spreads fastest.

The positive reinforcement of social networking sites can increase behaviors like binge drinking

Social-media sites – for example, Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook – that provide clear networking functions such as liking, sharing, commenting, and personal messaging with other users or “followers” are popular among youth. They have also become a prime milieu for the socialization of young people’s alcohol use. These results and others will be shared at the 44th annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA), which will be held virtually this year from the 19th – 23rd of June 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Health and Socializing: Why People Use Mixed-Reality Sports Tech

New technologies allow users to do things like race their real bikes against other real people in a virtual world, and a new study outlines what motivates people to use these online platforms. The findings offer insights for future iterations of these technologies – and how to market them.

Trump’s blog failed because visitors can’t “own the libs”

“From the Desk of Donald J. Trump,” a blog that the former president launched after getting banned from social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, has shut down after just a month. According to Binghamton University computer science professor Jeremy…

180 million Parler posts show discussion dominated by Trump, conversative topics, conspiracy theories

Article title: A Large Open Dataset from the Parler Social Network Authors: Max Aliapoulios, Emmi Bevensee, Jeremy Blackburn, Barry Bradlyn, Emiliano De Cristofaro, Gianluca Stringhini, Savvas Zannettou From the authors: “This paper presents a dataset of 183M Parler posts made by…

Does deplatforming work? Research explores effects of banning users from social network platforms

Article title: Understanding the Effect of Deplatforming on Social Networks Authors: Shiza Ali, Mohammad Hammas Saeed, Esraa Aldreabi, Jeremy Blackburn, Emiliano De Cristofaro, Savvas Zannettou, Gianluca Stringhini From the authors: “We find that users who get banned on Twitter/Reddit exhibit an…

Flagging coronavirus misinformation tweets changes user behaviors, UAH research shows

When Twitter flags tweets containing coronavirus misinformation, that really does affect the degree of validity most people ascribe to those messages, says new research based on a novel branching survey by three professors at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a part of the University of Alabama System.

American University Experts Available to Comment on Congress Hearing on Fake News & Misinformation on Social Media Platforms

American University Experts Available to Comment on Congress Hearing on Fake News & Misinformation on Social Media Platforms What: Today, the House Communications and Technology Subcommittee and the Consumer Protection and Commerce Subcommittee are holding joint hearing on misinformation and…

In a Contentious Era, How Do Friends with Different Values Stick Together? Faculty and Student Research Sheds Light

Americans are perhaps more polarized today than at any time since the Civil War. This idea has become ingrained in contemporary American discourse, popping up with increasing frequency in media coverage, in public opinion studies, and in research about how social media and its “filter bubbles” are driving polarization.