Expert: How the Las Vegas Aces’ championship win changes the game for women & the entire sports industry

For decades, Las Vegas — a city world famous for sports betting — was one of the few U.S. metropolises without a professional sports team. That all changed in 2017 when the NHL’s Golden Knights took a gamble by setting up shop in Southern Nevada, soon followed by the WNBA’s Aces and NFL’s Raiders. Just a few short years later, the Aces have upped the ante on their “raise the stakes” tagline and became the first major professional sports team to win a championship for Las Vegas.

Rensselaer Researcher To Follow the Trail of Misinformation

On 9/11, lawmakers from both parties unified in their response. Just over 20 years later, Congress is distinctly partisan, clashing on everything from the January 6 insurrection to COVID to climate change. Why? Many blame widespread and widely believed misinformation and disinformation. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Boleslaw Szymanski, Claire and Roland Schmitt Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, is part of an interdisciplinary team of researchers examining the flow of (mis)information in social media.

Greater Empathy in Adolescents Helps Prevent Bias-based Cyberbullying

Little is known about cyberbullying and empathy, especially as it relates harming or abusing others because of race or religion. A study is the first to examine general cyberbullying, race-based cyberbullying, and religion-based cyberbullying in young adolescents. Results show that the higher a youth scored on empathy, the lower the likelihood that they cyberbullied others. When it came to bias-based cyberbullying, higher levels of total empathy were associated with lower odds of cyberbullying others based on their race or religion.

JMIR Aging | Using Twitter to Examine Stigma Against People With Dementia During COVID-19

JMIR Publications recently published “Using Twitter to Examine Stigma Against People With Dementia During COVID-19: Infodemiology Study” in JMIR Aging which reported that during the pandemic, there has been significant social media attention focused on the increased COVID-19 risks and impacts for people with dementia and their care partners.

How to Effectively Market Influencers “Kollective”: An Innovation that Responds to Business Needs by Chula’s Start-Up

Chula alumni team in cooperation with the CU Innovation Hub has come up with the idea of “Kollective” a new start-up that provides the tools and services for full-scale marketing of influencers. With the analysis using big data, the best influencers are chosen to increase sales volumes in your business.

Elon Musk’s Irony: Bots, the Impetus to Abandon His Twitter Deal, Have Propelled Tesla

Maryland Smith’s David Kirsch, who is researching pro-Tesla Twitter bots, describes the irony in Elon Musk’s stated reason for moving to abandon his $44 billion Twitter purchase agreement.

Mass shootings: Conservative, liberal #socialmedia users starting to agree — enough is enough, says @UNLV researcher

Schoolchildren huddled in Uvalde, Tex. classrooms as classmates and teachers are cut down by a rogue gunman. A peaceful weekend afternoon at a Buffalo, N.Y. grocery store interrupted by a white supremacist who sprays the aisles of elderly, predominantly African American weekend shoppers with an AR-15 style rifle. Only five months into the year, these attacks tallied as the 198th and 214th U.

Spatial distribution of anti-Asian hate tweets during COVID-19

Anti-Asian hate language surged between January and March of 2020 with clusters of hateful tweets spread across the contiguous U.S. that varied in size, strength distribution and location. This is the first step towards helping officials predict where online racism may spill over to the streets as a public health threat.

Experts discuss mass shooting in Buffalo

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. – Experts at Binghamton University, State University of New York discussed issues surrounding the recent mass shooting in Buffalo. Watch the full talk via YouTube. The tragic, racially motivated mass shooting in Buffalo, N.Y., by an 18-year-old has…

Facebook Users’ Language Predicts Who’s at Risk for Dangerous Drinking

The language used in Facebook posts can identify people at risk of hazardous drinking and alcohol use disorders (AUDs), according to a new study. Social media platforms are a “low-cost treasure trove” of data, researchers claim, expanding the options for studying, screening, and helping people at risk. Social media content in recent years has been used to explore various public health phenomena. For example, language and “likes” have predicted depression, hospital visits, low birthweight, obesity, and life expectancy. Social media language has also been linked to patterns of alcohol consumption and related problems. For the study in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, investigators explored how convincingly the language of Facebook could be used to identify risky drinking. They compared the accuracy of multiple predictive tools, including a new technique for processing language that has rarely been applied to health research.

Loyalty Program Members, Regular Customers Respond Differently to Social Media Marketing

A new study finds the social media messages that resonate best with loyalty program members differ from the posts that work best with other customers. The finding could inform how best to craft social media campaigns aimed at either segment of a company’s customer base.

For cooperative teams, modesty leaves the best impression

People may forgo displaying luxury brands and other signals of status when they want to convince others that they will collaborate well with a team, as people who signal their wealth and social status could be perceived as uncooperative, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss the Mental Health Impacts of Social Media on Children

A Rutgers child and adult psychiatrist, Muhammad Zeshan, M.D., is available to discuss the negative impacts of social media platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter on teenagers. “I’ve seen the negative psychological impacts of social media, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic…

FAU Receives NOAA Grant to Assess Shark Interactions with Recreational Fishing

Shark depredation, where a shark partially or completely consumes a fish before a fisherman can get it out of the water, causes a range of negative biological and economic impacts. Scientists have found a novel way to address this issue using a citizen-science approach that includes surveys, videos, forensics and social media.

New Research Analyzes Millions of Twitter Posts During Hurricanes to Understand How People Communicate in a Disaster

In the face of a potentially disastrous storm like Hurricane Ida, people take to Twitter and other social media sites to communicate vital information. New research published in the journal Risk Analysis suggests that monitoring and analyzing this social media “chatter” during a natural disaster could help decision makers learn how to plan for and mitigate the impacts of severe weather events in their communities.

As COVID-19 and Online Misinformation Spread, Children and Teens Were Poisoned with Hand Sanitizer and Alcoholic Drinks

During the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, as false health information spread on social media, the number of children and teens poisoned with hand sanitizer or alcoholic beverages surged in Iran. These poisonings resulted in hundreds of hospitalizations and 22 deaths. Misinformation circulating on social media included the false suggestion that consuming alcohol (methanol) or hand sanitizer (ethanol or isopropyl alcohol) protected against COVID-19 infection (it does not). A major alcohol poisoning outbreak sickened nearly 6,000 Iranian adults, of whom 800 died. It was not known, however, to what extent children and adolescents were affected. For the study in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, investigators compared pediatric hospitalizations for ethanol and methanol poisoning during the early COVID-19 pandemic in Iran with the same period the previous year. They also looked at types of exposure and how those were linked to the children’s ages and clinical outcomes.

Stressed Teens Benefit from Coping Online, but a Little Goes a Long Way

An adolescent’s day can be filled with a dizzying array of digital technologies. For many teenagers, being online is a way to pass the time and communicate with friends. Cell phones and social media can also help teens cope with stressful events—as long as they strike the right balance between spending time online and pursuing other coping activities.

Politicians in areas with most climate risk tweet about it least

Politicians are more likely to tweet about climate change if they are Democrats, represent wealthier districts and if their constituents are concerned about the climate, according to a new Cornell University study. Meanwhile, communities most at risk from climate change are less likely to see their political leaders tweet about it, the multidisciplinary team of researchers said.

Study shows users banned from social platforms go elsewhere with increased toxicity

Users banned from social platforms go elsewhere with increased toxicity, according to a new study featuring researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York.