Bringing discoveries to light: X-ray science at Argonne

The Advanced Photon Source allows an intricate view of everything from proteins to nuclear fuel. With a planned upgrade, it will become even more powerful.

Advanced Photon Source helps reveal how antibodies bind a molecule linked to cancer

Researchers have developed antibodies that can bind to phosphohistidine, an unstable molecule that’s linked to cancer. To learn how the two bind together, the team turned to the powerful X-rays at Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source. These new insights into its structure will help scientists design better antibodies for potential treatments.

Unlocking the secrets of Earth’s early atmosphere

Research partly conducted at the Advanced Photon Source helped scientists discover the composition of Earth’s first atmosphere. What they found raises questions about the origin of life on Earth.

New Argonne partnership to predict fuel injector dynamics

Collaborators use experiments, high-fidelity simulations and machine learning to deliver predictive tools to engine manufacturers.

Seventeen from Argonne recognized with Secretary of Energy’s Honor Awards

Six groups that included seventeen scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory were recent recipients of the DOE’s 2020 Secretary of Energy’s Honor Awards.

High-throughput X-ray diffraction instrument comes to Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source

A collaboration between Argonne and several universities has led to the creation of a new high-throughput X-ray diffraction instrument that will enable materials research and clear the way for improvements in advance of the APS Upgrade.

Capturing 3D microstructures in real time

Argonne researchers have invented a machine-learning based algorithm for quantitatively characterizing material microstructure in three dimensions and in real time. This algorithm applies to most structural materials of interest to industry.

Argonne’s debt to 2019 Nobel Prize for lithium-ion battery

A roar of approval rang out at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Argonne National Laboratory upon the announcement in October that John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino had won the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. On December 10th in Stockholm, they received this highly coveted prize for their major contributions to the invention of the lithium-ion battery, which is a long-standing major focus of research at Argonne.