Gun Violence Exposure Associated with Higher Rates of Mental Health-Related ED Visits by Children

Exposure to neighborhood gun violence is associated with increased odds of mental health-related pediatric Emergency Department (ED) visits among children living within four to five blocks of a shooting, according to research by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, published today in JAMA Pediatrics.

UK HealthCare Launches Pediatric Neuroendocrine Tumor Program

UK HealthCare recently launched a new Pediatric Neuroendocrine Tumor Clinical and Research Program to improve treatment for children diagnosed with or at high risk for developing rare neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). This program is a joint effort between the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center and the Kentucky Children’s Hospital and is one of only a handful of centers specializing in this field in the world.

Nationwide Children’s Hospital Prioritizes Kindergarten Readiness as Part of Pediatric “Vital Signs”

Five and six-year-olds across the country are currently being evaluated for kindergarten readiness, a measurement of a child’s ability to engage with standard kindergarten curriculum. Nationwide Children’s Hospital is helping kids get ready for kindergarten locally with the hopes of researching outcomes and helping other systems adopt education as an important part of health care delivery.

Can Doctors Predict Which Children with Pneumonia Will Develop Mild or Severe Disease?

Currently, there are no evidence-based rules that help physicians in the Emergency Department (ED) predict if a child with community-acquired pneumonia will have a mild disease course that can be treated at home or a more severe illness that requires hospitalization. A recent study published in the journal Pediatrics found that the predictive accuracy of clinical judgement was generally fair, but clinicians were least accurate when predicting progression to severe disease in children initially classified as having “low to moderate” risk, which accounts for a large portion of children presenting with pneumonia.

Virtual Health Pilot Program Expands for Salado ISD Students and Families

The innovative virtual health pilot program is designed to facilitate care for elementary and middle school students by connecting the school nurse, the child’s parent or guardian, and a Baylor Scott & White McLane Children’s Medical Center provider via a video visit.

First targeted therapy for children with achondroplasia shows persistent height gain for up to two years

Children with achondroplasia, the most common form of disproportionate short stature, grow taller with trends in improved body proportions after two years of daily vosoritide treatment, a new study analysis finds. Results of the industry-sponsored study will be presented at ENDO 2021, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting.

MicroRNA Testing of Healthy Children Could Provide a Window on Heart and Kidney Health Later in Life

Molecules called microRNAs (miRNAs) that are measurable in urine have been identified by researchers at Mount Sinai as predictors of both heart and kidney health in children without disease. The epidemiological study of Mexican children was published in February in the journal Epigenomics.

Simulation Helps Refine Pediatric Care Guidelines For COVID-19

DALLAS – Jan. 28, 2021 – Simulation can be a viable way to quickly evaluate and refine new medical guidelines and educate hospital staff in new procedures, a recent study from UT Southwestern’s Department of Pediatrics shows. The findings, published recently in the journal Pediatric Quality and Safety and originally shaped around new COVID-19-related pediatric resuscitation procedures at UTSW and Children’s Health, could eventually be used to help implement other types of guidelines at medical centers nationwide.

Discriminatory policies threaten care for transgender, gender diverse individuals

The Endocrine Society and the Pediatric Endocrine Society oppose legislative efforts to block transgender and gender diverse individuals from accessing gender-affirming medical and surgical care, the two medical societies said in a joint policy perspective published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Surgeon Establishes First-Ever Guidelines for Pediatric Opioid Prescribing

Dr. Lorraine Kelley-Quon forms team of health care providers and community advocates to establish recommendations for safe opioid use. According to the National Institutes of Health, opioid misuse and addiction in the United States is a national crisis, with an economic burden upwards of $78 billion. Opioids are useful for pain management following surgery and other major procedures, but until now there have been no recommendations guiding safe use of opioids in children.

Niagara Falls ‘Miracle’ Baby Beats Aggressive Leukemia After Successful CAR-T Cancer Immunotherapy in Buffalo

“She’s a bundle of joy, she’s a blessing. She’s just life.” That’s what Cariorl Mayfield of Niagara Falls, NY, says about his young daughter, Chastity, a year after she went through a complex series of therapies at the Roswell Park Oishei Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Program to treat the leukemia she was diagnosed with at only 5 weeks old.

Complications from diabetes linked to worse memory, IQ in children

A study led by UC Davis Health researchers uncovered that even one severe episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is linked to cognitive problems; and among children with a previous diagnosis, repeated DKA exposure predicted lower cognitive performance after accounting for glycemic control.

Just in time for children returning to school this fall, Baylor Scott & White Health has launched an at-home monitoring service for children diagnosed with COVID-19.

Just in time for children returning to school this fall, Baylor Scott & White Health has launched an at-home monitoring service for children diagnosed with COVID-19. The service has been offered for adults since April. If you are interested in…

Baylor Scott & White Health Launches Digital At-Home Monitoring for Children Diagnosed with COVID-19

Baylor Scott & White Health has launched expanded digital care options via the MyBSWHealth app and online portal to provide support for children who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Digital at-home monitoring has been available for adults ages 18 and older since May

Dr. Lisa Gwynn Named President of Florida Chapter of American Academy of Pediatrics

Lisa Gwynn, D.O., M.B.A., associate professor of clinical pediatrics and public health sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has been named president of the Florida Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (FCAAP). Dr. Gwynn’s two-year appointment, effective Sept. 6, was voted on by FCAAP members across Florida.

Pregnant mother’s immunity tied to behavioral, emotional challenges for kids with autism

Children with autism born to mothers who had immune conditions during their pregnancy are more likely to have behavioral and emotional problems, a UC Davis Health study has found. Offspring sex may also interact with maternal immune conditions to influence outcomes, particularly in terms of a child’s cognition.

Virginia Tech, partners launch nation’s first pediatric rehabilitation resource center

Research partners across three institutions are opening the nation’s first and only resource center dedicated to promoting clinical trials research in the rapidly expanding field of pediatric rehabilitation. It will be one of a network six centers under the umbrella of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, part of the National Institutes of Health, with direct oversight from the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research.

Should You Take Your Child to the Emergency Room, Urgent Care—or Call the Doctor?

As a parent, your number one goal is keeping your child safe and healthy. When is it time to head to the emergency department (ED)—and when is it best to call your child’s doctor, or go to an urgent care center?

Previously undetected brain pulses may help circuits survive disuse, injury

For the sake of research on brain and mobility, Nico Dosenbach, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, wore a cast on his right dominant arm despite not having an injury. He then underwent hours of MRI scans while wearing the cast, and for two weeks before and after. The MRI scans found previously undetected brain pulses. The researchers also found that disuse of an arm causes the affected brain region to disconnect from the rest of the brain’s motor system within two days. However, spontaneous pulses maintain activity in the disused circuits until the region becomes active again when mobility is regained.

How Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Is Keeping Families Safe During COVID-19 How Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Is Keeping Families Safe During COVID-19

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has launched extensive protective measures to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus and keep patients, families and team members safe. With these measures firmly in place, the hospital is encouraging families not to delay needed care for their children.

New chemotherapy drug studied for malignant brain tumor in children

MTX110 is a new formulation of panobinostat, a chemotherapy drug that has shown promise in laboratory models of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Now, MTX110 is the focus of a novel trial that places the therapy directly into the fourth ventricle of the brain to treat patients with recurrent medulloblastoma.

Behavioral intervention, not lovastatin, improves language skills in youth with fragile X

A UC Davis Health study found more evidence for the efficacy of behavioral intervention in treating language problems in youth with fragile X syndrome (FXS), but none for lovastatin as a treatment for FXS.

Robot Uses Artificial Intelligence and Imaging to Draw Blood

Rutgers engineers have created a tabletop device that combines a robot, artificial intelligence and near-infrared and ultrasound imaging to draw blood or insert catheters to deliver fluids and drugs. Their research results, published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence, suggest that autonomous systems like the image-guided robotic device could outperform people on some complex medical tasks.

Study finds many youth living with undiagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome

Most youth living with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) have not been diagnosed, according to a new prevalence study from researchers at DePaul University and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, published by the journal Child & Youth Care Forum. Leonard A. Jason, a professor of psychology at DePaul University, led the seven-year study to screen more than 10,000 children and teenagers in the Chicago area.