Decreases in Exercise Closely Linked with Higher Rates of Depression during the Pandemic

Exercise has long-been recommended as a cognitive-behavioral therapy for patients of depression, yet new evidence from the University of California of San Diego suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic changed the nature of the relationship between physical activity and mental health.

Screen time can change visual perception — and that’s not necessarily bad

The coronavirus pandemic has shifted many of our interactions online, with Zoom video calls
replacing in-person classes, work meetings, conferences and other events. Will all that screen time damage our vision? Maybe not. It turns out that our visual perception is highly adaptable, according to research from Psychology Professor and Cognitive and Brain Sciences Coordinator Peter Gerhardstein’s
lab at Binghamton University.

COVID-19 and Connectedness: Finding a Balance in Our Online Lives

As uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic quarantine wears on, there remains one constant: a reliance on the internet, social media, and streaming services for work, school, entertainment, and keeping in touch with friends and family. But is the increased screen time — and the resulting onslaught of emails, memes, and media consumption that come with the removed barrier between work and home — taking a toll on our mental health? For answers, we turned to Simon Gottschalk, a UNLV sociology professor and author of “The Terminal Self: Everyday Life in Hypermodern Times,” which examines the social and psychological toll of our increasingly online lives on work, education, family life, interactions, our sense of self, and more.

Ergonomics 101: Working from Home During Coronavirus

Marshmallow-soft couch cushions and a cutesy vintage chair here. Dim lighting and blackout curtains there. Ah, there’s nothing like the comforts of home. Except during a pandemic. Across the nation, new work-from-home and distance learning routines amid the COVID-19 outbreak have many people — and their strained necks, backs, and eyes — wishing they could trade those home comforts for the comforts of the office.