New Transitional Care Clinical Pathway Improves Health Equity

People with multiple chronic conditions require complex care management and often experience significant challenges when transitioning from hospital to home. This is especially true for people insured by Medicaid who are disproportionately Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) and experience higher chronic disease burdens and adverse outcomes following hospitalization. For them, comprehensive transitional care support is a paramount, yet often absent aspect of care delivery that may result in health inequities.

Journal of Medical Internet Research | Blood Pressure Monitoring, a Digital Tool for Diabetes

JMIR Publications recently published “Blood Pressure Monitoring as a Digital Health Tool for Improving Diabetes Clinical Outcomes: Retrospective Real-world Study” in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR), which reported that there is a lack of understanding of the association between blood glucose (BG) and blood pressure (BP) levels when using digital health tools.

JMIR Biomedical Engineering | Using Machine Learning to Reduce Treatment Burden

JMIR Publications recently published “Reducing Treatment Burden Among People With Chronic Conditions Using Machine Learning: Viewpoint” in JMIR Biomedical Engineering which reported that the COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated multiple challenges within the health care system and is unique to those living with chronic conditions.

Drugs showing promise in cancer trials reduce scarring for scleroderma, study shows

Epigenetic drugs that have shown promise in cancer trials significantly reduce scarring in the cells of patients with scleroderma, a new study shows. Results reveal that drugs that inhibit BRD4, known to play a role in cancer, also affect fibrosis in scleroderma. Researchers tested BRD4 inhibitors on the skin fibroblasts of scleroderma patients and in mouse models of skin fibrosis, finding that the treatment stopped scarring in both human-derived cells and in animals.

Health Status of Vulnerable Gopher Tortoises Revealed in Southeastern Florida

In previously unstudied gopher tortoise aggregations, researchers found that overall, 42.9 percent had circulating antibodies to an infectious bacterium that causes upper respiratory tract disease. Physical examination showed that 19.8 percent had clinical signs consistent with upper respiratory tract disease and 13.2 percent had some form of physical abnormality. None of the tortoises tested positive for Ranavirus or Herpesvirus, which represents important baseline data, since these viruses are thought to be emerging pathogens of other tortoise and turtle species.

A Crisis of Comfort

In “The Comfort Crisis,” UNLV journalism professor Michael Easter investigates how our modern-day comforts are linked to some of our most pressing problems—obesity, chronic disease, depression—and how by leaving our comfort zone, we can improve our overall mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing.

Health Providers Call on NY State to End Decades of Neglect of Chronic Disease Disaster in Poor Communities with Investment in Community-Based Preventive Programs That Can Save Thousands of Lives and Billions of Public Health Tax Dollars

State leaders have the opportunity to reverse decades of deadly neglect of Black and Brown communities where diabetes and other chronic diseases have devastated lives and families, a crisis that has worsened through the COVID epidemic, heath providers and city leaders said outside Governor Cuomo’s office in Manhattan as they announced the kickoff of the New York Wellness Initiative on Monday.

University Hospitals Appoints Francoise Adan, MD as Chief Whole Health & Well-being Officer to Support and Enhance Well-being of its Patients, Caregivers, and the Broader Northeast Ohio Community

Dr. Adan will now guide a system-wide effort to foster an organizational culture that supports and empowers people to attain their optimal professional and personal potential in the context of true well-being.

Healthy Lung Month: Know these pulmonary fibrosis risk factors

October is Healthy Lung Month, an apt time to educate the public about the importance of protecting our lungs against mold, airborne pollutants and smoking – which put hundreds of thousands of Americans at higher risk for pulmonary fibrosis (PF).

Thomas J. Fuchs, DSc, Named Dean of Artificial Intelligence and Human Health and Co-Director of the Hasso Plattner Institute for Digital Health at Mount Sinai

Appointment Advances Health System’s Role as Leader in AI and Digital Health

Prevent Severe COVID Symptoms With Lifestyle Changes

Obesity is contributing to worse outcomes in people with COVID-19. Dr. Naomi Parrella, medical director of the Rush Center for Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery, explains how managing your weight can lower your risk for severe COVID symptoms and help you prevent other chronic diseases.

Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month Highlights Realities of Rare Disease

September’s Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month shares crucial realities and insights about the rare disease, its symptoms and helpful resources provided by the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation to educate the public about this devastating disease which impacts over 200,000 Americans.

Call to action for stronger, better-funded federal nutrition research

A paper from research, policy, and government experts provides a compelling vision to strengthen existing federal nutrition research and improve cross-governmental coordination in order to accelerate discoveries and improve public health, food security, and population resilience. A coalition of organizations is standing in support of the paper and the need for greater investment and coordination in federal nutrition research.

Philadelphia Tax on Sweetened Drinks Led to Drop in Sales

Philadelphia’s tax on sweetened beverages led to a 38.9 percent drop in the volume of taxed beverages sold at small, independent retailers and a significant increase in the price of taxed beverages, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. This study builds on previous research that suggests beverage taxes can help reduce purchases of sugary drinks, led by Christina Roberto, PhD, an associate professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Penn, and senior author on this latest paper published in Health Affairs.

ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS SUPPORTS INTRODUCTION OF MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY LEGISLATION IN CONGRESS

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics supports U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel (N.Y.) and Rep. Pete King’s (N.Y.) commitment to America’s health by introducing the Medical Nutrition Therapy Act of 2020. The bill would provide coverage for Medicare beneficiaries to obtain treatment from registered dietitian nutritionists and other qualified nutrition experts for many common and costly chronic diseases.

Harness artificial intelligence and take control your health

Sedentary behaviours, poor sleep and questionable food choices are major contributors of chronic disease, including diabetes, anxiety, heart disease and many cancers. But what if we could prevent these through the power of smart technologies?

COVID-19: REGISTERED DIETITIAN NUTRITIONISTS PLAY INTEGRAL ROLE IN TREATING PATIENTS

Health care teams are working to comfort and treat patients with the novel coronavirus COVID-19 including helping them breathe and providing nutritional support. Registered dietitian nutritionists are an integral part of the health care team managing the nutrition and hydration needs of patients.

High-altitude adaptations connected with lower risk for chronic diseases

High-altitude adaptations in the Himalayas may lower risk for some chronic diseases, according to a research team including faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York, the University of New Mexico, and the Fudan University School of Life Sciences.

Researchers map areas of major Texas cities where residents are most likely to need hospitalization, ICU care for COVID-19

Areas within Texas’ major metropolitan cities where residents are at the greatest risk for hospitalization and critical care due to COVID-19 have been mapped for the first time by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Three-year, $1.35 million grant to aid mental health programming in western Kenya

The Astellas Global Health Foundation has awarded the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH), under the direction of the Indiana University Center for Global Health, a three-year, $1.35 million grant to provide 400,000 people with access to mental health programming in western Kenya.

Sarah Szanton, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing professor and developer of CAPABLE, will be live on POLITICO

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing (JHSON) Professor Sarah Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN, has been invited to serve on the POLITICO Live panel “Combating Chronic Conditions,” December 3, Washington DC. She will join panelists across the health care spectrum to discuss policies, strategies, and innovations that can improve primary care treatment for patients with chronic conditions.

Rutgers study examines smoking status, health conditions in older Chinese American men

The findings of the study by the Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research underscore the need for culturally targeted interventions to prevent and reduce tobacco use, manage chronic disease and screen for lung cancer.

Expanding Medicaid means chronic health problems get found & health improves, study finds

Nearly one in three low-income people who enrolled in Michigan’s expanded Medicaid program discovered they had a chronic illness that had never been diagnosed before, according to a new study.
And whether it was a newly found condition or one they’d known about before, half of Medicaid expansion enrollees with chronic conditions said their overall health improved after one year of coverage or more.