Study yields clues to why Alzheimer’s disease damages certain parts of the brain

A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis yields clues to why certain parts of the brain are particularly vulnerable to Alzheimer’s damage. It comes down to the gene APOE, the greatest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. The parts of the brain where APOE is most active are the areas that sustain the most damage, they found.

Today: ANA2022 Media Roundtable to Spotlight Latest in Neuro Research

As the American Neurological Association’s 147th Annual Meeting wraps up today, October 25, the ANA is holding a Media Roundtable at 11 a.m. U.S. Central for reporters to access the latest developments in neurology and neuroscience.

American Neurological Association Publishes Research Abstracts for ANA2022, Oct. 22–25 in Chicago

Abstracts of breaking research in neurology and neuroscience, to be presented at the 2022 American Neurological Association Annual Meeting Oct. 22-25, are now available in Annals of Neurology and on the ANA2022 website.

AAPM 2022 Presidential Symposium: Impact of Medical Physics to Transform Health Care Approaches

The knowledge a medical physicist brings to treatment plans for patients usually focuses on science and technology. But more and more, these scientists are taking the lead on a people-first approach to better health care for those who need it. During the President’s Symposium at the annual AAPM meeting, three keynote speakers will discuss treatment of the Alzheimer’s epidemic, the dynamics of patient engagement, and two research initiatives prioritized by the Biden administration.

Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation and Harrington Discovery Institute Invite Proposals for 2022 ADDF-Harrington Scholar Award

Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals and the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) announce a joint request for proposals for the 2022 ADDF-Harrington Scholar Award. The ADDF-Harrington Scholar Award is designed to accelerate the translation of innovative research that could treat, prevent, or slow Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias.

The Request for Proposal (RFP) is open to academic investigators at accredited medical centers, research institutions, and universities in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Researchers working on drug development programs that are relevant to, but not presently focused on, the Alzheimer’s field are also encouraged to apply. This award provides a combination of financial support and expert drug development guidance to provide the best chance to move research beyond the bench to the bedside.

Study of promising Alzheimer’s marker in blood prompts warning about brain-boosting supplements

Elevated levels of an enzyme called PHGDH in the blood of older adults could be an early warning sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Research led by UC San Diego has consistently found high levels of PHGDH expression in brain tissue and blood samples of older adults with different stages of the disease.

‘Eye-catching’ smartphone app could make it easy to screen for neurological disease at home

UC San Diego researchers developed a smartphone app that could allow people to screen for Alzheimer’s disease, ADHD and other neurological diseases and disorders—by recording closeups of their eye. The app uses a smartphone’s built-in near-infrared camera and selfie camera to track how a person’s pupil changes in size. These pupil measurements could be used to assess a person’s cognitive condition.

Researchers: Majority of patients with Alzheimer’s disease would not have been eligible for clinical trials of new controversial Alzheimer’s drug    

In a research letter in JAMA, physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) found that the vast majority of patients who had a diagnosis of either cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, or Alzheimer’s disease related disorders, including cardiovascular disease, prior stroke, use of blood thinners, and age over 85 years, would have been excluded them from the aducanumab clinical trials.

NeuroVision Imaging Inc. Announces Additional Funding From the ADDF to Accelerate Development of Novel Blood-Based Lab Test to Predict Dementia Before Clinical Onset

NeuroVision Imaging Inc. has received an additional investment from the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation to hasten development of a novel blood-based lab test to provide detection and measurement of biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias before clinical onset.

Do Some Diabetes Drugs Reduce the Risk of Alzheimer’s?

MINNEAPOLIS – People taking certain drugs to lower blood sugar for type 2 diabetes had less amyloid in the brain, a biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease, when compared to both people with type 2 diabetes not taking the drugs and people without diabetes. The new study, published in the August 11, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, also found people taking these drugs, called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, showed slower cognitive decline than people in the other two groups.

Self-reported declines in cognition may be linked to changes in brain connectivity

A team from Wayne State University recently published the results of a three-year study of cognitive changes in older adults who complained that their cognitive ability was worsening though clinical assessments showed no impairments. MRIs at 18-month intervals showed significant changes in functional connectivity in two areas of the brain.

Renowned Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Researcher Available to Comment on June 7 FDA Approval of Aducanumab

The Food and Drug Administration on June 7 approved Aducanumab, which will carry the brand name Aduhelm, as the first new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years. Dr. Jeffrey L. Cummings, UNLV research professor and leading expert on Alzheimer’s clinical trials, calls…

CUR Health Sciences Division Announces 2021 Mentor Awardees

The Health Sciences Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research announces the 2021 recipients of its Mentor Awards, which honor exceptional mentoring and advising by higher education faculty across all subdivisions of health sciences.

Nanoparticles Help Untangle Alzheimer’s Disease Amyloid Beta Plaques

ROCKVILLE, MD – Scientists are still a long way from being able to treat Alzheimer’s Disease, in part because the protein aggregates that can become brain plaques, a hallmark of the disease, are hard to study.

NeuroVision Imaging Inc., Announces New Funding From the ADDF to Develop Affordable, Accessible Biomarkers to Diagnose Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias

NeuroVision Imaging Inc., announced today it has received an investment from the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF) to support developing reliable, affordable biomarker tests for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia and neurodegenerative disorders.

Coconut Oil’s Benefits to Alzheimer’s Ignored in N.Y. Times Attack, Says Dr. Leslie Norins of MCI911.com

Although cardiologists often decry coconut oil because of certain fats it contains, they overlook the growing evidence that other fatty constituents, especially medium-chain triglycerides, may alleviate some cases of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

How Caregivers of People with Dementia Can Navigate Holidays During the Pandemic

As COVID-19 cases increase across the nation, many caregivers are trying to navigate the holidays for relatives with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that people not travel to limit the potential spread of the coronavirus.

Mary Catherine Lundquist, program director of Care2Caregivers, a peer counseling helpline (800-424-2494) for caregivers of people with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease operated by Rutgers Behavioral Health Care, discusses how families can stay connected with their loved ones.

Researchers Discover Neuroprotective Treatment for Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of cognitive impairment that affects millions of people worldwide. Despite growing awareness about the debilitating and lifelong progressive consequences of TBI, there are currently no treatments that slow the deteriorative process. TBI survivors are currently treated with extensive physical and cognitive rehabilitation, accompanied by medications that may mitigate symptoms yet do not halt or slow neurodegeneration. Now, researchers have found for the first time that this process can be pharmacologically reversed in an animal model of this chronic health condition, offering an important proof of principle in the field and a potential path to new therapy.

What Factors Help Predict Who Will Keep Their Memory into Their 90s?

Why do some people stay sharp into their 90s, even if they have the amyloid plaques in the brain that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease? And why do others reach their 90s without ever developing any plaques? These questions are explored in a new study published in the July 22, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Blood Vessel Defects in Eyes May Foretell Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease in its early stages affects the integrity of small blood vessels in the retinas of patients, according to a recent study led by Cedars-Sinai. This discovery holds promise for early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s through the retina, a back-of-the-eye organ that is an extension of the brain and easily accessible for live, noninvasive imaging.

How to Help Loved Ones with Dementia Cope During COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting social isolation present unique challenges for more than five million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers. Monica Townsend, training and consultation specialist at the Comprehensive Services on Aging at Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care, shares how caregivers can cope through the health crisis: