Government Law Center Releases New Explainer on joint investigating committees, their role in a post-Cuomo NY

The Government Law Center (GLC) at Albany Law School has just released its latest explainer to help attorneys, politicians, and the public understand how joint investigating committees could help New York re-evaluate how it investigates, disciplines, and removes officials from state-wide office in the wake of the resignation of former Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Barriers to Voting in Elections Linked to Increased Odds of Being Uninsured

Groups commonly targeted by voting restriction laws—those with low incomes, who are racial minorities, and who are young—are also less likely to be insured in states with more voting restrictions, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and University of Alberta School of Public Health, Edmonton, Canada.

Political variables carried more weight than healthcare in government response to COVID-19

Political institutions such as the timing of elections and presidentialism had a larger influence on COVID-19 strategies than the institutions organizing national healthcare, according to a research team led by a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Establishing Juneteenth as national holiday is opportunity to create “new America”

The Senate has unanimously passed a bill to establish Juneteenth, a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, as a federal holiday. This is an historic moment and an opportunity to create a “new America,” according to Anne Bailey, professor of history at Binghamton University, State University of New York and director of the Harriet Tubman Center for the Study of Freedom and Equity.

Director of UCI Cybersecurity Policy & Research Institute available to address recent ransomware attacks.

As the first executive director of the multidisciplinary Cybersecurity Policy & Research Institute at the University of California, Irvine, Bryan Cunningham is focused on solution-oriented strategies to address technical, legal and policy challenges to combat cyber threats, protect individual privacy and civil…

A leader’s gender plays a role in local government sustainability policymaking

When it comes to local government, does the gender of a mayor or county executive matter in sustainability policymaking? Yes, but only in certain ways, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

It’s morally wrong for rich nations to hoard COVID-19 vaccine

Rich nations should not engage in “vaccine nationalism” and keep the COVID-19 vaccine to themselves when poorer nations need them, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Rutgers Legal Expert Available to Discuss Environmental, Climate Change Priorities

New Brunswick, N.J. (Jan. 21, 2021) – Rutgers University Professor Cymie R. Payne, an expert on United States and international environmental laws, is available for interviews on how the administration of President Biden can strengthen laws and regulations and efforts to…

Massive dataset reveals which governments have best responded to COVID-19 pandemic

Are our political institutions up for the task of managing the COVID-19 pandemic and any possible future similar threats? A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has compiled an extensive dataset tracking public health government responses to COVID-19 at national and subnational levels of government throughout the world.

Rutgers Expert Can Discuss 10 Ways to Adapt to Coastal Flooding

New Brunswick, N.J. (Oct. 14, 2020) – Rutgers coastal expert Vanessa Dornisch is available for interviews on 10 steps residents can take to prepare for sea-level rise and adapt to increased coastal flooding. Dornisch, coastal training program coordinator at the…

2nd annual “Doing Business” report ranks North American cities by ease of doing business

The Center for the Study of Economic Liberty at ASU has released the second edition of its signature Doing Business North America report, which provides objective measures of business regulations across 130 cities in 92 states, provinces and districts in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

Momentum of unprecedented Chilean uprising stalled by COVID-19 pandemic

The uprising that erupted in fall 2019 in Chile against the post-dictatorship government may be diminished by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

COVID-19: How South Korea Prevailed While the U.S. Failed

In a commentary, researchers demonstrate the stark differences in public health strategies from two democratic republics: South Korea and the United States, which have led to alarming differences in cases and deaths from COVID-19. After adjusting for the 6.5 fold differences in populations, the U.S. has suffered 47 times more cases and 79 times more deaths than South Korea.

New book explores four major threats to US democracy

In their new book, “Four Threats: The Recurring Crises of American Democracy,” Suzanne Mettler, professor of government at Cornell University, and Robert Lieberman, professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University, not only assert that history repeats itself – they also identify the underlying causes of democracy destabilization. American democracy has often been fragile, they argue, and today it faces an unprecedented crisis.

Coronavirus knowledge needs to be shared freely, not kept secret by governments, corporations

Government agencies and medical institutions have been hit hard recently by hackers attempting to steal coronavirus research. The US and other countries are battling to keep their coronavirus innovations secret (or protect their research in other ways) partly because they…

State, municipal leaders can issue “right” COVID-19 policies even when national leaders put forth “wrong” policies

Democratic institutions, in particular federalism, can impact the speed and degree of policy responses protecting citizens during the COVID-19 pandemic, even when national leaders share public rhetoric that is non-conducive to speedy policy response, says an international group of researchers…

Businesses need to consider health, financial situation of employees in return to work amidst COVID-10

Employers need to consider the health and economic consequences of asking employees to return to work amidst the COVID-19 outbreak, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Hassoun said that employers may…

Looking ahead, the United States has an obligation to help other countries fight the coronavirus

The United States has an obligation to help developing countries who will certainly fare much worse in the COVID-19 pandemic, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York.  “I believe we have a moral…

Nonprofits Navigate Uncertain Times Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

Performing arts centers. Hospitals. Museums. Social service agencies. Nonprofit organizations in local communities are as vast and varied as the private businesses that operate and make up a majority of a city’s economic engine. But as state leaders gave orders…

‘Evidence-based national direction’ still largely lacking in federal coronavirus response, government policy expert says

When it comes to mitigating the effects of COVID-19 in America, President Trump has made his opinion clear: states need to do more. The problem? Many governors have said they either don’t completely agree with that approach or outright think the opposite. What’s the right approach? Probably somewhere in between, according to Virginia Tech political scientist Karen Hult.

The U.S. government is failing to uphold its duty to protect citizens during the coronavirus pandemic

By not supplying New York the necessary ventilators it needs to help during the coronavirus outbreak, the government is failing to uphold its social contract with citizens, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New…

Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss How to Help Free Market Fight Coronavirus

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 25, 2020) – Stephen K. Burley, director of the RCSB Protein Data Bank headquartered at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, is available for interviews on how to help the free market fight the coronavirus. His viewpoint is published in the journal Nature. “Had drug…

Coronavirus crisis: governments, organizations need to get creative to avoid healthcare rationing

Governmental and nongovernmental organizations need to get creative to avoid healthare rationing during the coronavirus crisis, says Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York and head of the Global Health Impact project. “While transparency is…

Both our political past and present shape America’s response to COVID-19, says policy expert

One researcher at West Virginia University suggests that we need to set aside political partisanship as the U.S. responds to the novel coronavirus.  President Donald Trump declared a national emergency Friday (March 13). Earlier this week, the World Health Organization declared it…

Election 2020: Expert says more women in representative government means less corruption

As Super Tuesday approaches, Virginia Tech economist Sudipta Sarangi will be available to discuss the role of women in representative government leadership roles and their impact on corruption. According to a study led by Sarangi, government corruption is less prevalent…

Former EPA administrator available to comment on expected revocation of California’s authority on car emissions

The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce Wednesday it is rescinding California’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles, a move that is part of a larger strategy to rollback vehicle fuel economy and emissions standards adpoted during…

Former EPA administrator available to comment on expected revocation of California’s authority on car emissions

The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce Wednesday it is rescinding California’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles, a move that is part of a larger strategy to rollback vehicle fuel economy and emissions standards adpoted during…