‘I’m watching you’ behavior produces racial disparities in school discipline

Research from Calvin Zimmermann, the O’Shaughnessy Assistant Professor of Education in the Department of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame, indicates that early childhood teachers often apply discipline disproportionately in their classrooms based on a student’s race.

Sociologists to Explore Topics of Attacks on Public Education, Racial Justice, the Future of Democracy, and More at ASA Annual Meeting, Aug. 17-21, Philadelphia; Press Registration Open

Approximately 600 sessions featuring over 3,000 research papers are open to the press. From race and racism to mental health, from climate control and environmental policy issues to artificial intelligence, sociologists are investigating and reporting on the most sensitive problems confronting American society.

UC San Diego Expert on Violence Assesses Police Brutality and Mass Shootings in America

Tage Rai is a psychologist and assistant professor of management at UC San Diego’s Rady School of Management who studies ethics and violence. He co-authored the book “Virtuous Violence” outlining research which finds that most acts of violence are driven by moral motives on the part of perpetrators. That is, perpetrators believe they are doing the right thing when they hurt and kill their victims. In this Q&A, Rai, who teaches negotiation at the Rady School, addresses dual crises impacting America—police brutality and gun violence—and what can be done to prevent them.

New Psychological Science Findings Link Local Prejudice to Police Militarization, Offer Hope for Fostering Belief in Science

Findings also help explain why happy people are more optimistic, how false visual memories can be perpetuated, and why feeling good often just means feeling better.

1 in 2 Black adolescents faced online racial discrimination at least once in 2020: study

Against the backdrop of racial tensions across America in late 2020, online platforms became a place of discussion, discourse and even protest. Through this time period, Black adolescents experienced a different effect than their white peers; they more distinctly suffered mental health issues after being confronted with online racial discrimination, according to a University of Pittsburgh study.

Structural Racism Drives Higher COVID-19 Death Rates in Louisiana, Study Finds

Disproportionately high COVID-19 mortality rates among Black populations in Louisiana parishes are the result of longstanding health vulnerabilities associated with institutional and societal discrimination, according to research conducted by an interdisciplinary team under the mentorship of University of Maryland (UMD) Clark Distinguished Chair Deb Niemeier and UMD Associate Professor of Kinesiology Jennifer D. Roberts in the School of Public Health.

Flawed AI Makes Robots Racist, Sexist

The work, led by Johns Hopkins University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and University of Washington researchers, is believed to be the first to show that robots loaded with an accepted and widely used model operate with significant gender and racial biases. The work is set to be presented and published this week at the 2022 Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency.

ASA Annual Meeting, Aug. 5-9, Los Angeles; Press Registration Open

Sociologists to Explore Topics of Gun Violence, Policing, Housing Insecurity, Abortion Rights, and More at ASA Annual Meeting, Aug. 5-9, Los Angeles; Press Registration Open

Spatial distribution of anti-Asian hate tweets during COVID-19

Anti-Asian hate language surged between January and March of 2020 with clusters of hateful tweets spread across the contiguous U.S. that varied in size, strength distribution and location. This is the first step towards helping officials predict where online racism may spill over to the streets as a public health threat.

Experts discuss mass shooting in Buffalo

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. – Experts at Binghamton University, State University of New York discussed issues surrounding the recent mass shooting in Buffalo. Watch the full talk via YouTube. The tragic, racially motivated mass shooting in Buffalo, N.Y., by an 18-year-old has…

Fear, social context (not mental illness) fuel violent extremist views

Christine Reyna is director of the Social and Intergroup Perception Lab at DePaul University, where researchers examine how individuals and groups legitimize and leverage prejudice and discrimination to maintain status, cultural values and systems that benefit one’s own groups — often at the expense of others.

Study: Filipino, Vietnamese and Thai students are ‘invisible’ victims of inequality in STEM fields

The findings of the University at Buffalo study highlight the need for higher education leaders to understand the specific needs of underrepresented Asian American ethnic subgroups and develop sustainable reform policies.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Launches Project to Dismantle Systemic Racism in Medical Education

With generous support from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai announced today a three-year project to replicate its model for dismantling systemic racism in medical education. The school has put forth a Request for Proposal (RFP) seeking eight to ten partner medical schools in the United States and Canada who will participate in the Icahn Mount Sinai learning model, centered on a virtual learning platform.

Dr. Chandra Ford – Founding Director, Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health, Professor of Community Health Sciences, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, available as expert on health equity

Dr. Chandra Ford, founding director of the Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and professor of Community Health Sciences, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, is available as expert on health equity. Prof. Ford’s expertise includes:…

Nursing organizations state their positions on systemic racism: JANAC authors analyze themes and messages

The murders of George Floyd and other Black Americans have prompted a national outcry against structural racism and police brutality. How are leading nursing organizations and schools of nursing defining their positions on racism? That’s the topic of a special article in the July/August issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Establishing Juneteenth as national holiday is opportunity to create “new America”

The Senate has unanimously passed a bill to establish Juneteenth, a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, as a federal holiday. This is an historic moment and an opportunity to create a “new America,” according to Anne Bailey, professor of history at Binghamton University, State University of New York and director of the Harriet Tubman Center for the Study of Freedom and Equity.

FRIDAY, MAY 21: Expert Panel on Policing and Racism, Insights from Psychological Science

A panel of experts in psychological science will present the latest research on racial bias and police encounters. Journalists are invited to attend this one-hour panel presented by the Association for Psychological Science.  WHEN: Friday, May 21, 2021; 2:30 p.m. EDT  WHERE: Via Zoom (link will be provided to registered journalists); register at [email protected]   TOPICS WILL INCLUDE: …

Forty years of nursing science in HIV/AIDS: JANAC marks progress and challenges

From the very beginning of the AIDS epidemic in 1981, nurses have been at the forefront of patient care, advocacy, and research. But even in the age of antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis, many challenges remain in reducing the impact of HIV and AIDS, according to the special May/June issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

CUR Psychology Division Announces 2021 Psychology Research Awardees

The Psychology Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research announces the 2021 recipients of its Psychology Research Awards. The recipients are undergraduate students conducting original psychological research, who receive awards of up to $500 per project.

Experts: Anti-Asian racism nuanced and often intertwined in misogyny

On March 16, a man went on a shooting rampage at three Atlanta spas, killing eight people, including six Asian women. The killings have sparked outrage and fear in the Asian American community, but the suspect has denied that the killings were racially motivated.The suspect’s claims and subsequent claims made by the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office have set off a debate about anti-Asian racism in America.