Study: Filipino, Vietnamese and Thai students are ‘invisible’ victims of inequality in STEM fields

The findings of the University at Buffalo study highlight the need for higher education leaders to understand the specific needs of underrepresented Asian American ethnic subgroups and develop sustainable reform policies.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Launches Project to Dismantle Systemic Racism in Medical Education

With generous support from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai announced today a three-year project to replicate its model for dismantling systemic racism in medical education. The school has put forth a Request for Proposal (RFP) seeking eight to ten partner medical schools in the United States and Canada who will participate in the Icahn Mount Sinai learning model, centered on a virtual learning platform.

Dr. Chandra Ford – Founding Director, Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health, Professor of Community Health Sciences, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, available as expert on health equity

Dr. Chandra Ford, founding director of the Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and professor of Community Health Sciences, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, is available as expert on health equity. Prof. Ford’s expertise includes:…

Nursing organizations state their positions on systemic racism: JANAC authors analyze themes and messages

The murders of George Floyd and other Black Americans have prompted a national outcry against structural racism and police brutality. How are leading nursing organizations and schools of nursing defining their positions on racism? That’s the topic of a special article in the July/August issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Establishing Juneteenth as national holiday is opportunity to create “new America”

The Senate has unanimously passed a bill to establish Juneteenth, a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, as a federal holiday. This is an historic moment and an opportunity to create a “new America,” according to Anne Bailey, professor of history at Binghamton University, State University of New York and director of the Harriet Tubman Center for the Study of Freedom and Equity.

FRIDAY, MAY 21: Expert Panel on Policing and Racism, Insights from Psychological Science

A panel of experts in psychological science will present the latest research on racial bias and police encounters. Journalists are invited to attend this one-hour panel presented by the Association for Psychological Science.  WHEN: Friday, May 21, 2021; 2:30 p.m. EDT  WHERE: Via Zoom (link will be provided to registered journalists); register at [email protected]   TOPICS WILL INCLUDE: …

Forty years of nursing science in HIV/AIDS: JANAC marks progress and challenges

From the very beginning of the AIDS epidemic in 1981, nurses have been at the forefront of patient care, advocacy, and research. But even in the age of antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis, many challenges remain in reducing the impact of HIV and AIDS, according to the special May/June issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

CUR Psychology Division Announces 2021 Psychology Research Awardees

The Psychology Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research announces the 2021 recipients of its Psychology Research Awards. The recipients are undergraduate students conducting original psychological research, who receive awards of up to $500 per project.

Experts: Anti-Asian racism nuanced and often intertwined in misogyny

On March 16, a man went on a shooting rampage at three Atlanta spas, killing eight people, including six Asian women. The killings have sparked outrage and fear in the Asian American community, but the suspect has denied that the killings were racially motivated.The suspect’s claims and subsequent claims made by the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office have set off a debate about anti-Asian racism in America.

IU experts available to discuss rise in anti-Asian violence, increased tension after Atlanta spa shootings

BLOOMINGTON and INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — A recent report found that anti-Asian violence has been on the rise in the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most recently, the shooting in Atlanta that killed six Asian women has drawn more attention to…

Statement by AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine and President Shaun R. Harper on the Shootings in Atlanta and Growing Anti-Asian Violence

The shooting deaths of eight people, including six women of Asian descent, in Atlanta yesterday is a horrendous tragedy, and just the latest incident in an ever growing wave of mass violence in our country. We extend our deepest sympathy to the loved ones of the victims and to communities in Atlanta and across the United States that have been deeply affected by this senseless assault.

Black Females More Likely Than Black Males to Exercise, Eat Healthy When Faced with Perceived Discrimination

Black men and women, as well as adolescent boys and girls, may react differently to perceived racial discrimination, with Black women and girls engaging in more exercise and better eating habits than Black men and boys when faced with discrimination, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Study: reparations for slavery could have reduced COVID-19 infections and deaths in U.S.

New study suggests monetary reparations for Black descendants of people enslaved in the United States could have cut SARS-CoV-2 transmission and COVID-19 rates both among Black individuals and the population at large.

Researchers modeled the impact of structural racism on viral transmission and disease impact in the state of Louisiana.
The higher burden of SARS-CoV-2 infection among Black people also amplified the virus’s spread in the wider population.

Reparations could have reduced SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the overall population by as much as 68 percent.

Compared with white people, Black individuals in the United States are more likely to be infected with SARS-CoV-2, more likely to end up in the hospital with COVID-19, and more likely to die from the disease.

Systemic Racism & Health Care: Building Black Confidence in the COVID-19 Vaccine

The Tuskegee syphilis experiment. The secret sale of Henrietta Lacks cancer research cells. Jim Crow laws affecting African Americans’ ability to receive medical treatment. For weeks, it’s been hard to hear over the clamor of millions of Americans lining up for COVID-19 vaccines. But not everyone has been enthused — namely, large swaths of minority communities, which comprise the populations disproportionately impacted by the virus, but whose hesitance is largely fueled by the country’s racist medical past.

Why So Few Black Skiers and Ballet Dancers?

A new book, The Color of Culture, is the first to show with statistical rigor the much lower participation rates of Black vs. white Americans in a nine recreational and cultural activities, from golf to painting. It uses statistical techniques to show that systemic racism explains the discrepancy.

Rounds with Leadership: Combating Racism and Cultivating Inclusion

At a time when our nation is struggling to address systemic racism and the inequities that have long plagued communities of color, it is truly unsettling to see the recent Executive Order on Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping, which calls for restrictions on diversity training offered at federal agencies.

Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

Front-line Worker Story: Ebony Hunter — Teamwork Will Get Us Through
It seems there will never be enough “thank-you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients who have COVID-19, the dangerous coronavirus disease. Their dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Tips for Tackling Implicit Bias in Teaching and Learning 

Kendra Gage describes implicit bias as the stories we make up about people before we get to know them. It’s a practical and personal definition from an historian who studies what some consider an unlikely, even unpopular, topic for a white professor — the civil rights movement. Because of her chosen discipline, Gage, an assistant professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies in the UNLV College of Liberal Arts, said she’s received questions and double-takes from students and others who are surprised to find her at the helm of an African American Studies class.

Anti-Asian racism during COVID-19 has historical ties in United States

Anti-Asian hate crimes during health crises are unfortunately not new, according to a new academic paper examining the history of this phenomenon. The research team, including an Iowa State University criminal justice researcher, looked at how anti-Asian hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic have furthered the historical “othering” of Asian Americans and reproduced inequalities.