New Study Shows Cancer Mortality Higher Among American Indian and Alaska Native Individuals; Colorectal Cancer Rapidly Increasing Before Age 50

New findings by researchers at the American Cancer Society show overall cancer mortality among American Indian and Alaska Native individuals is 18% higher than among White individuals despite similar cancer incidence. This disparity is driven by common cancers that are receptive to early detection.

New Study Shows Recently Diagnosed Adult Cancer Survivors at Higher Risk for Bone Fractures

Adult cancer survivors, particularly those diagnosed within five years and/or have a history of chemotherapy, have an increased risk for bone fractures, specifically pelvic and vertebral fractures, compared to older adults without cancer, according to a new large study by researchers at the American Cancer Society.

New Study Shows Patients Paying More Out-of-Pocket Costs for Cancer Care

A new, large study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center shows rising costs of cancer treatments led to increases in total costs of care, and when compounded with greater cost sharing, increased out-of-pocket costs for privately insured, patients under 65 years old.

New Study Shows Two Million Life-Years Lost and $21 Billion in Lost Earnings Annually Due to Smoking Associated Cancer Deaths

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society reports nearly 123,000 cancer deaths, or close to 30 percent of all cancer deaths, were from cigarette smoking in the United States in 2019, leading to more than two million Person-Years of Lost Life (PYLL) and nearly $21 billion in annual lost earnings. These losses were disproportionately higher in states with weaker tobacco control policies in the South and Midwest. The results were published today in the International Journal of Cancer.

Study Shows Older Age and Smoking Most Important Risk Factors for Developing Any Cancer

A new large study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows older age and smoking are the two most important risk factors associated with a relative and absolute five-year risk of developing any cancer. The findings also demonstrate that in addition to age and smoking history, clinicians should consider excess body fatness, family history of any cancer, and several other factors that may help patients determine if they may benefit from enhanced cancer screening or prevention interventions. The data was published today in the journal Cancer.

Study Shows Fewer People Tried to Quit Smoking During COVID-19 Pandemic

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows serious smoking cessation activity declined among adults in the United States immediately after the onset of COVID-19 and persisted for over a year. Declines in attempts to quit smoking were largest among persons experiencing disproportionately negative outcomes during COVID-19, including Black people, people with comorbidities, middle-aged people, and lower educated people. The data was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network Open.

New Perspective Shows Higher Breast Cancer Mortality for Black Women Emerged 40 years ago

A new perspective by researchers from the American Cancer Society and the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio shows the high burden of breast cancer mortality in African American (Black) women versus White women began in the United States in the 1980’s.

Study Shows Public Perception of E-Cigarettes vs. Cigarettes Harms Changed Sharply During EVALI Epidemic and COVID-19 Pandemic

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows perceptions of electronic or e-cigarettes as being “more harmful” than cigarettes by adults in the United States more than doubled between 2019-2020 and perceptions of e-cigarettes as “less harmful” declined between 2018-2020.

Study Finds COVID-19 Pandemic Reduced Breast, Cervical, Colorectal Cancer Screenings by Millions in 2020

New findings led by researchers at the American Cancer Society show the number of women in the United States who reported having a recent (in the past year) breast cancer or cervical cancer screening dropped by 2.13 million (6%) and 4.47 million (11%) respectively in 2020 compared to 2018. The study is the first of its kind to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer screenings nationally using population-based data.

New Study Finds Medicaid Expansion Increases Survival in Newly Diagnosed Cancer Patients

A new large study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society (ACS) shows Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was associated with an increase in two-year overall survival rates among patients newly diagnosed with cancer, especially among non-Hispanic Black people and people living in rural areas.

New Study Reports Need to Monitor Public Interest in Shopping and Sales of Popular Puff Bar E-cigarette Brand

New research led by scientists at the American Cancer Society shows the need for continued surveillance of the changes in shopping interest and sales for Puff Bar, the most preferred brand of electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes among youth in the United States. Public interest in shopping and sales of Puff Bar skyrocketed in 2020.

New Research Shows Trend Toward Unhealthy Eating During Pandemic

As COVID-19 spread throughout the world, our daily routines and behaviors changed drastically. A new study of more than 2,000 people in the U.S. found that the pandemic has also affected how we eat. The authors found a decrease in the consumption of many food groups, particularly healthy foods such as vegetables and whole grains, compared to before the pandemic.

Lerman Takes the Reins as AACI President

USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center Director Caryn Lerman, PhD, is the new president of the Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI). She begins her two-year term early due to Karen E. Knudsen, MBA, PhD, stepping down to become the new CEO of the American Cancer Society.

Karen E. Knudsen to Step Down as President of Association of American Cancer Institutes

Association of American Institutes (AACI) President Karen E. Knudsen, MBA, PhD, announced today that she is resigning from Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (SKCC) at Jefferson Health in Philadelphia. She will step down as AACI president and begin a new role as chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society (ACS) on June 1.

Leading Health and Cancer Advocacy Groups Unite to Reduce Racial Disparities in Cancer Care

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) and the National Minority Quality Forum (NMQF) presented new ideas for overcoming inequality in oncology. The recommendations address how medical systems often disproportionately fail minority patients.

Leading Cancer Organizations Warn Cancer Doesn’t Stop for COVID-19 and Neither Should You

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) are teaming up with leading cancer organizations across the country to endorse prioritizing the safe resumption of cancer screening and treatment during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The coalition of 76 organizations is releasing an open letter about the threat cancer still poses to people’s health and a reminder that acting as soon as is safely possible can lead to much better outcomes in the future.

Brooke Emerling awarded Research Scholar Grant by American Cancer Society

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute is pleased to announce that the American Cancer Society has awarded Brooke Emerling, Ph.D., a Research Scholar Grant (RSG) to study a new approach to targeting tumors that have a mutation in the p53 gene—the most altered gene in human cancers. The grants are often a career-launching award for “rising stars” in the cancer research arena. The four-year grant will help advance Emerling’s research toward eliminating cancer as a major health problem.

Younger Cancer Survivors Far More Likely to Experience Food and Financial Insecurity than their Cancer-Free Peers, According to Researchers from American Cancer Society

New research from the American Cancer Society in the March 2020 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds that younger cancer survivors are more likely to experience significant financial strain for food, housing, and monthly bills after diagnosis.

Opioid Self-management Practices and Potential Safety Risks Among Patients with Cancer

Despite a national opioid crisis, prescribed opioid analgesics remain a viable option for pain management for patients with cancer. In effect, patients with cancer represent one of the few groups excluded from most state legislation and policy initiatives on prescribing opioids as well as from opioid stewardship programs of many health systems. However, little is understood about oncology patients’ opioid self-management practices and potential safety risk that may stem from these practices.

Bonni Lee Guerin, MD Honored By American Cancer Society – Northeast Region

Bonni Lee Guerin, MD, hematologist/oncologist and physician researcher at Overlook Medical Center, was honored by the American Cancer Society for her role in advancing breast cancer treatment and prevention. In addition to her forward-looking clinical approach, Dr. Guerin is the principal investigator (PI) of numerous clinical trials exploring new ways to incorporate the latest advances in the management of breast cancer. Dr. Guerin was PI at Atlantic Health System, with the largest number of study participants of any center in the New York-New Jersey metro area, for the landmark TAILORx clinical trial.

Intestinal Stem Cell Genes May Link Dietary Fat and Colon Cancer

Two genes that appear to help stem cells in the intestine burn dietary fat may play a role in colon cancer, according to a Rutgers study. The study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, describes a new connection between the way cells consume fat and how genes regulate stem cell behavior in the intestines of mice.

Pioneering oncology researcher leads publication of new exercise prescriptions for cancer prevention, survival

Oncology nurse practitioner Anna Schwartz, a professor at Northern Arizona University, was a leader on the team that reviewed the latest scientific evidence and offered recommendations about the benefits of exercise for prevention, treatment, recovery and improved survival, which were shared this week in three publications.