RESEARCH ALERT: The New Geography of the Gut

Investigators from Cedars-Sinai; the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); Harvard University; and the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel conducted a study to determine where individual nutrients are absorbed in the small intestine. For the first time, they identified the molecular markers that define five distinct intestinal regions.

New Research Shows Patients with Cancer who Suffered a Major Adverse Financial Event More Likely to be Diagnosed With Advanced Stage Disease

New findings led by researchers at the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute show more than one-third of cancer patients had a major adverse financial event – bankruptcy, lien, or eviction – before their cancer diagnosis.

New Study Shows Insurance Coverage Disruptions Affect Key Cancer Screenings for U.S. Adults

A new study by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows that adults in the United States with prior insurance coverage disruptions are significantly less likely to receive guideline-concordant and past-year cancer screening, compared to people with continuous coverage.

New Study Shows Adults Treated for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Vulnerable to Hazards of Wildfires

New research by scientists at the American Cancer Society and the University of California, San Francisco, shows individuals in the United States undergoing radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer who are exposed to wildfires near the treating facility have worse overall survival than unexposed individuals.

New Study Finds Limited Documentation of Cost Discussions With Patients Newly Diagnosed With Advanced Cancer

A new study by researchers at the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute, shows only about a quarter of individuals newly diagnosed with advanced cancers had documented physician discussions about costs of care, which may hinder identifying patient needs and tracking outcomes of referrals for assistance.

New Research Shows Patients Receiving Cancer Treatment Understand Health Insurance Basics; Important Knowledge Gaps Remain

A new study by researchers at the American Cancer Society showed among patients receiving outpatient cancer treatment in two sites, most people could understand basic health insurance terms, such as premiums and deductibles.

Inflammatory Breast Cancer: Know the Risks and Warning Signs of This Rare, Fast-Growing Cancer

Inflammatory breast cancer is a rare type of breast cancer. It only accounts for one to five percent of all breast cancer cases, but it’s important to know your risk and the warning signs, as this form of the disease is aggressive, fast-growing, and hard to detect early. For October, during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the American Cancer Society is highlighting IBC to help women be aware of this invasive cancer.

Colorectal Cancer Patients in Sub-Saharan Africa Receiving Inadequate Care; Survival After Diagnosis Poor, New Study Shows

In new findings led by researchers at the American Cancer Society, Martin-Luther University in Germany, and many other institutes worldwide, fewer than one in 20 patients diagnosed with potentially curable colorectal cancer received standard of care in Sub-Saharan Africa.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month: Know the Warning Signs, When to Get Screened and Important New Treatments

Renowned prostate cancer researcher Dr. Lorelei Mucci is the director of strategic research partnerships at the American Cancer Society. Her role includes leading an ACS initiative called IMPACT, or “Improving Mortality Toward Prostate Cancer Together” to address the alarming negative trends in prostate cancer incidence and disparities. For Prostate Cancer Awareness Month Dr. Mucci reviews the signs and symptoms of prostate cancer, including important information about risk factors, PSA screening, and more.

New Study Shows Substantial Racial and Ethnic Disparities Among Survivors of Second Primary Cancers in the United States

In new findings from researchers at the American Cancer Society, non-Hispanic Black individuals diagnosed with a second primary cancer experienced 21% higher cancer-related death rates and 41% higher cardiovascular-related death rates compared with their non-Hispanic White counterparts.

Early-Stage Cancer Diagnoses Decreased Sharply in the U.S. During First Year of COVID-19 Pandemic; Underserved Greatly Affected

A new study from researchers at the American Cancer Society found monthly adult cancer diagnoses decreased by half in April 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. The largest decrease was for stage I cancers, resulting in a higher proportion of late-stage diagnoses.

Lali Medina-Kauwe, PhD, Named Inaugural Chair in Medical Discovery

Cedars-Sinai has named Lali Medina-Kauwe, PhD, as the inaugural holder of the Carol Moss Foundation Chair in Medical Discovery.

New Study Shows Black Cancer Survivors Face Increased Mortality From Heart Disease; Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Insurance Contributing Factors

A new study from researchers at the American Cancer Society found that Black cancer survivors in the United States experience a higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease compared with White cancer survivors.

New Study Shows Medicaid Expansion Associated With Increase in Palliative Care for Patients With Advanced Cancers

More people with advanced cancers in the United States received critical palliative care services, according to new findings by researchers at the American Cancer Society. Medicaid expansion under the ACA was associated with the largest increases in palliative care use.

New Research Shows Increased Medical Debt Associated with Significantly Higher Cancer Mortality Rates

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society found medical debt is associated with significantly higher cancer mortality rates at the county level in the United States. On average, an estimated 20% of the population carried medical debt. For every one percent increase in the population with medical debt, there was a 1.12 increase in death rates (per 100,000 person-years) from cancer. The findings were presented today at this year’s annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago, June 2-6.

Regular and Increasing Number of Breast Cancer Screenings Improves Survival, New Study Finds

New research led by an international team supported by the American Cancer Society shows women with an increasing number of regular mammography screening exams prior to diagnosis of breast cancer considerably improved their probability of survival. The findings were presented at this year’s annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago, June 2-6.

New Study Shows Mortality Rates for All Major Cancers Decreasing Globally, Except Liver Cancer in Men and Lung Cancer in Women

A new study conducted by scientists at the American Cancer Society and Brookdale University Hospital Medical Center reveals recent mortality rates for all major cancers decreased in most of the studied countries except lung cancer in females and liver cancer in males, where increasing rates were observed in most countries. The research also showed that cancer-specific mortality rates varied substantially across countries, with rates of lung and cervical cancer varying by 10-fold. The study was published today in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research.

First Study of Trends in Cancer Death Rates by Congressional District Shows Overall Declines; Regional, Ethnic and Racial Disparities Persist

In the first analysis of its kind, researchers at the American Cancer Society discovered cancer death rates across all congressional districts in the United States show an overall decline in the past 25 years, with most districts showing a 20%-45% decline among males and a 10%-40% decline among females.

Cancer Survivors with Transportation Barriers to Care Face Risk for Emergency Room Use and Mortality, New Study Shows

New research from scientists at the American Cancer Society and Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, found delayed care due to lack of transportation is associated with increased emergency room (ER) use and mortality risk among adults with and without cancer history. Cancer survivors with transportation barriers had the highest risk. The study was published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

New Research Shows E-Cigarette Use Up Sharply Among Younger Adults in U.S. During EVALI Outbreak and COVID-19 Pandemic

A new study by researchers at the American Cancer Society (ACS) shows almost three-quarters of a million more adults in the United States, ages 18-29 years, used e-cigarettes between 2019-2021 during the period that spanned the EVALI outbreak (E-cigarette or vaping product use–associated lung injury) and COVID-19 pandemic.

American Cancer Society Releases Latest Cancer Statistics, Launches Initiative to Address Prostate Cancer Resurgence and Disparities

Today, the American Cancer Society released Cancer Statistics, 2023, the organization’s annual report on cancer facts and trends. According to the report, overall cancer mortality has dropped 33% since 1991, averting an estimated 3.8 million cancer deaths. Based on ACS data, in 2023 there are projected to be 1,958,310 new cancer cases and 609,820 cancer deaths in the United States.

New Study Shows Western Region has Highest Prostate Cancer Mortality Among White Men in U.S.; Black Men Face Highest Prostate Cancer Mortality Overall

New findings led by researchers at the American Cancer Society show the highest mortality rates for prostate cancer in White men were found in the Western region of the United States, including California, despite low incidence rates.

Travel Time for Breast Cancer Screening Remains Long for Many Women in the U.S., New Study Shows

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society (ACS) shows travel time to the nearest mammography facility is long for a considerable proportion of women in the United States, particularly affecting more than 50% of women in rural areas in 28 states.

New Study Shows Cancer Mortality Higher Among American Indian and Alaska Native Individuals; Colorectal Cancer Rapidly Increasing Before Age 50

New findings by researchers at the American Cancer Society show overall cancer mortality among American Indian and Alaska Native individuals is 18% higher than among White individuals despite similar cancer incidence. This disparity is driven by common cancers that are receptive to early detection.

New Study Shows Recently Diagnosed Adult Cancer Survivors at Higher Risk for Bone Fractures

Adult cancer survivors, particularly those diagnosed within five years and/or have a history of chemotherapy, have an increased risk for bone fractures, specifically pelvic and vertebral fractures, compared to older adults without cancer, according to a new large study by researchers at the American Cancer Society.

New Study Shows Patients Paying More Out-of-Pocket Costs for Cancer Care

A new, large study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center shows rising costs of cancer treatments led to increases in total costs of care, and when compounded with greater cost sharing, increased out-of-pocket costs for privately insured, patients under 65 years old.

New Study Shows Two Million Life-Years Lost and $21 Billion in Lost Earnings Annually Due to Smoking Associated Cancer Deaths

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society reports nearly 123,000 cancer deaths, or close to 30 percent of all cancer deaths, were from cigarette smoking in the United States in 2019, leading to more than two million Person-Years of Lost Life (PYLL) and nearly $21 billion in annual lost earnings. These losses were disproportionately higher in states with weaker tobacco control policies in the South and Midwest. The results were published today in the International Journal of Cancer.

Study Shows Older Age and Smoking Most Important Risk Factors for Developing Any Cancer

A new large study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows older age and smoking are the two most important risk factors associated with a relative and absolute five-year risk of developing any cancer. The findings also demonstrate that in addition to age and smoking history, clinicians should consider excess body fatness, family history of any cancer, and several other factors that may help patients determine if they may benefit from enhanced cancer screening or prevention interventions. The data was published today in the journal Cancer.

Study Shows Fewer People Tried to Quit Smoking During COVID-19 Pandemic

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows serious smoking cessation activity declined among adults in the United States immediately after the onset of COVID-19 and persisted for over a year. Declines in attempts to quit smoking were largest among persons experiencing disproportionately negative outcomes during COVID-19, including Black people, people with comorbidities, middle-aged people, and lower educated people. The data was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network Open.

New Perspective Shows Higher Breast Cancer Mortality for Black Women Emerged 40 years ago

A new perspective by researchers from the American Cancer Society and the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio shows the high burden of breast cancer mortality in African American (Black) women versus White women began in the United States in the 1980’s.

Study Shows Public Perception of E-Cigarettes vs. Cigarettes Harms Changed Sharply During EVALI Epidemic and COVID-19 Pandemic

A new study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society shows perceptions of electronic or e-cigarettes as being “more harmful” than cigarettes by adults in the United States more than doubled between 2019-2020 and perceptions of e-cigarettes as “less harmful” declined between 2018-2020.

Study Finds COVID-19 Pandemic Reduced Breast, Cervical, Colorectal Cancer Screenings by Millions in 2020

New findings led by researchers at the American Cancer Society show the number of women in the United States who reported having a recent (in the past year) breast cancer or cervical cancer screening dropped by 2.13 million (6%) and 4.47 million (11%) respectively in 2020 compared to 2018. The study is the first of its kind to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer screenings nationally using population-based data.

New Study Finds Medicaid Expansion Increases Survival in Newly Diagnosed Cancer Patients

A new large study led by researchers at the American Cancer Society (ACS) shows Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was associated with an increase in two-year overall survival rates among patients newly diagnosed with cancer, especially among non-Hispanic Black people and people living in rural areas.

New Study Reports Need to Monitor Public Interest in Shopping and Sales of Popular Puff Bar E-cigarette Brand

New research led by scientists at the American Cancer Society shows the need for continued surveillance of the changes in shopping interest and sales for Puff Bar, the most preferred brand of electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes among youth in the United States. Public interest in shopping and sales of Puff Bar skyrocketed in 2020.

New Research Shows Trend Toward Unhealthy Eating During Pandemic

As COVID-19 spread throughout the world, our daily routines and behaviors changed drastically. A new study of more than 2,000 people in the U.S. found that the pandemic has also affected how we eat. The authors found a decrease in the consumption of many food groups, particularly healthy foods such as vegetables and whole grains, compared to before the pandemic.

Lerman Takes the Reins as AACI President

USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center Director Caryn Lerman, PhD, is the new president of the Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI). She begins her two-year term early due to Karen E. Knudsen, MBA, PhD, stepping down to become the new CEO of the American Cancer Society.

Karen E. Knudsen to Step Down as President of Association of American Cancer Institutes

Association of American Institutes (AACI) President Karen E. Knudsen, MBA, PhD, announced today that she is resigning from Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center (SKCC) at Jefferson Health in Philadelphia. She will step down as AACI president and begin a new role as chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society (ACS) on June 1.

Leading Health and Cancer Advocacy Groups Unite to Reduce Racial Disparities in Cancer Care

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) and the National Minority Quality Forum (NMQF) presented new ideas for overcoming inequality in oncology. The recommendations address how medical systems often disproportionately fail minority patients.

Leading Cancer Organizations Warn Cancer Doesn’t Stop for COVID-19 and Neither Should You

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) are teaming up with leading cancer organizations across the country to endorse prioritizing the safe resumption of cancer screening and treatment during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The coalition of 76 organizations is releasing an open letter about the threat cancer still poses to people’s health and a reminder that acting as soon as is safely possible can lead to much better outcomes in the future.