covid19

COVID-19: Scientists identify human genes that fight infection

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have identified a set of human genes that fight SARS-CoV-2 infection, the virus that causes COVID-19. Knowing which genes help control viral infection can greatly assist researchers’ understanding of factors that affect disease severity and also suggest possible therapeutic options. The genes in question are related to interferons, the body’s frontline virus fighters.

MAPPING COVID RISK IN URBAN AREAS: A WAY TO KEEP THE ECONOMY OPEN

As COVID-19 vaccines slowly roll out across the world, government officials in densely populated countries must still manage vulnerable communities at highest risk of an outbreak. In a new study published in the journal Risk Analysis, researchers in India propose a COVID Risk Assessment and Mapping (CRAM) framework that results in a zoned map that officials can use to place more targeted restrictions on high-risk communities. Successfully used by officials in Jaipur at the peak of the pandemic last spring, their framework could help other vulnerable countries avoid a shutdown of their regional economies.

Study: Including Videos in College Teaching May Improve Student Learning

As higher education institutions worldwide transition to new methods of instruction, including the use of more pre-recorded videos, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many observers are concerned that student learning is suffering as a result. However, a new comprehensive review of research offers some positive news for college students. The authors found that, in many cases, replacing teaching methods with pre-recorded videos leads to small improvements in learning and that supplementing existing content with videos results in strong learning benefits.

Study: After COVID-19 Hit, Federal Financial Aid Applications Dropped Sharply among Potential First-Year Students

After the COVID-19 crisis hit last March, federal student aid applications among potential college freshmen in California dropped 14 percent between mid-March and mid-August, relative to prior years. While there were also initial declines in applications among current undergraduates and graduate students, these quickly recovered and ended 8 percent higher relative to prior years. The findings, published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, are from the first academic study conducted on this topic.

AACI Partners With Federal Vaccine Panel to Promote Cancer Patient Health

AACI was invited last summer to join the Vaccine Consultation Panel (VCP) alongside other leading health and science organizations in the U.S. Through the VCP, AACI has received periodic updates on the development and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines and participated in efforts to educate the cancer center community and the general public on the importance of widespread vaccine uptake.

UC San Diego Bolsters Aggressive Return to Learn Plan to Prevent Outbreaks on Campus

UC San Diego’s nationally recognized, evidence-based Return to Learn program employs a comprehensive suite of education, monitoring, testing, intervention and notification tools that no other university is using. And the program continues to expand—including a recent introduction of weekly self-administered student testing kits, growth of the campus’s wastewater viral monitoring program and widespread use of the cellphone-based CA COVID Notify exposure notification system.

Stimulus Relief Funds Increase Social Distancing to Stop Spread of COVID-19

As case rates of COVID-19 reach new heights across the nation, many states and cities are tightening stay-at-home restrictions to stop the spread. New research suggests that that those suffering from economic hardships are less likely comply with new stay-at-home orders; however these same U.S. residents would be more likely to adhere to the new public health guidelines if their households received stimulus funds.

History of insightful HIV research inspires neutron scattering approach to studying COVID-19

What began as novel investigations into HIV, abruptly pivoted to the novel coronavirus as it began to spread across the globe. Now, ORNL researchers are using neutrons to learn more about the SARS-CoV-2 protease—a protein enzyme that enables the virus to replicate within the human body. Insights on the protein structure and its behaviors will be used to create more accurate models for simulations in aims of finding drug inhibitors to block the virus’s ability to reproduce.

Why having a national health information technology infrastructure could help save lives

Real-time data about health and health care during the COVID-19 pandemic can help contain the virus but has been difficult to obtain. A new paper published in JAMA explores the concept of a national health information technology (IT) infrastructure to provide up-to-date patient information in public health emergencies, which can then be used in planning and containment efforts.

Food Safety and Coronavirus

Covid Conversations on Risk featuring Jade Mitchell, Ph.D., and Felicia Wu, Ph.D. both from Michigan State University addresses food safety and risk. A recording of the webinar can be found on the SRA website at https://sra.org/covid-19-resources

SLAS Releases COVID-19 Infographics to Explain Research Terminology

SLAS has released the first two infographics in an ongoing series of tools to help the general public better understand the technical jargon being discussed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Official press conferences, news articles, statistical reports, social media posts and health organizations use technical research terms that often are misunderstood (or not understood at all) by a general audience.

Stricter, immediate intervention critical for keeping COVID-19 cases manageable for health care facilities, according to UTHealth modeling

Led by Eric Boerwinkle, PhD, and Momiao Xiong, PhD, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) modeled the potential spread of COVID-19 based on whether the Greater Houston area began stringent interventions immediately or waited one week or two weeks. That data was presented Monday to city and county officials.

Coronavirus: What companies and the federal government should do to help: A Q&A with @MichiganRoss professor Ravi Anupindi

FACULTY Q&ARavi Anupindi.Ravi Anupindi is a professor of technology and operations and faculty director for the Center for Value Chain Innovation at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. He discusses how companies can deal with the COVID-19 outbreak.Ravi Anupindi.What can companies do right now to deal with supply chain interruptions?Anupindi: It is important to recognize that virus outbreaks are different from other types of disruptions like fires, floods and earthquakes.