Do Passengers Want Self-driving Cars to Behave More or Less Like Them?

Researchers asked participants about their personal driving behaviors such as speed, changing lanes, accelerating and decelerating and passing other vehicles. They also asked them the same questions about their expectations of a self-driving car performing these very same tasks. The objective of the study was to examine trust and distrust to see if there is a relationship between an individual’s driving behaviors and how they expect a self-driving car to behave.

UNH Research: No Second Chance to Make Trusting First Impression, or is There?

It’s important to make a good first impression and according to research at the University of New Hampshire a positive initial trust interaction is helpful in building a lasting trust relationship. Researchers found that trusting a person early on can have benefits over the life of the relationship, even after a violation of that trust. However, equally interesting was that if people were not trusted during a first meeting, there were still opportunities to build trust in the future.

Betrayal or Cooperation? Analytical Investigation of Behavior Drivers

When looking at humanity from a macroscopic perspective, there are numerous examples of people cooperating to form various groupings. Yet at the basic two-person level, people tend to betray each other, as found in games like the prisoner’s dilemma, even though people would receive a better payoff if they cooperated among themselves. The topic of cooperation and how and when people start trusting one another has been studied numerically, and in a paper in Chaos, researchers investigate what drives cooperation analytically.