“I am able.” Asian Congress for People with Special Needs Conference Organized by Chula Faculty of Education and People Go Network Forum

The Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University, in collaboration with People Go Network Forum, organized the “I am able” Asian Congress for People with Special Needs Conference from February 22 to 25, 2024, at Umpai Sucharitkul meeting room, Faculty of Education, Chulalongkorn University.

GoodWalk Thailand: Designing “Walkable City” Revitalizing the Economy, Enhancing Quality of Life for City Dwellers

Chula joins hands with the Thai Health Promotion Foundation (ThaiHealth) to design “Walkable City” using the GoodWalk Score as the criteria for selecting the pilot area to be developed as Walkable City in Bangkok as well as many cities around the country. The plan is to help reduce pollution, revitalize tourism, and the local economy while enhancing the quality of life and health for city dwellers.

“Anti-Choke Mug” – Chula Innovation for Neuro Patients to Drink Water Confidently

Chula Medicine has designed an anti-choke mug with calculated angle, amount, and time of water flow from the mug to the patient’s lips hoping to reduce choking that may lead to lung infection, bring peace of mind to caregivers, and make it safer for patients who will have a better quality of life.

Improving Quality of Life and Sleep in People with Memory Problems Without Using Drugs

A groundbreaking study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), recently published in Innovation in Aging, has shown promising results in improving the quality of life (QOL) and sleep quality in individuals living with memory problems.

Want a Larger Brain? Drink Less. Brain Imaging Study Finds Both Cutting Down and Quitting Drinking Linked to Healthier Brains

The brains of people who reduce their drinking, as well as of people who quit drinking entirely, have greater volume in certain regions than people who drink more heavily, according to a new study of adults treated for alcohol use disorder.

UNFPA and Chulalongkorn Hold a Special Talk on “World Population Day” and Launch “inCUsive” Platform for Sustainable Development

Together with Chulalongkorn University, the UNFPA celebrated World Population Day by holding a panel discussion titled “Bridging Integration Gaps and Promoting Gender Equality for Young People Towards Aged Society,” as well as launching the inCUsive platform to promote sustainable development.

MD Anderson receives nearly $4.9 million in CPRIT funding for cancer prevention programs and recruitment

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center was awarded four grants totaling nearly $4.9 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) to support the expansion of physical activity programs for survivors, the dissemination of targeted tobacco cessation programs and the recruitment of a first-time, tenure-track faculty member.

Roswell Park Study is First to Show That Exercise Strengthens Immune System in Multiple Myeloma Patients

Research has shown that the immune system doesn’t function properly in patients with multiple myeloma, a blood cancer that occurs when plasma cells — a type of white blood cell — multiply out of control. But a clinical trial led by Jens Hillengass, MD, PhD, Chief of Myeloma at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, shows that exercise may have the power to strengthen the immune system in those patients, providing a non-pharmaceutical method of helping control the disease.

Majority of Nurses Attribute Well-Being Struggles to Staffing Shortages

With projected national shortages of 63,720 registered nurses in 2030 and 141,580 licensed practical nurses in 2035, a new survey finds one-third of nurses plan to leave the profession in the next two years.

Chula Launches the Latest Parkinson’s Gloves to Reduce Tremors

Doctors at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital have developed lightweight and easy-to-use Parkinson’s gloves that can automatically reduce tremors, allowing Parkinson’s Disease patients to enjoy social life and reducing side effects from medication and risk from brain surgery.

For People with Parkinson’s Disease, Quality of Life Linked to Race, Ethnicity

Among those living with Parkinson’s disease, Black, Hispanic and Asian people were found to have a lower health-related quality of life than white people, according to a new study published in the April 5, 2023, online issue of Neurology® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Study Unravels Interplay Between Sleep, Chronic Pain and Spinal Cord Stimulation

Spinal cord stimulation uses low levels of electricity to relieve pain. A study is the first to measure this treatment’s effects on patients by gauging improvement in insomnia after spinal cord stimulation. Results showed a 30 percent or more improvement of both nighttime and daytime components of insomnia in 39.1 percent of study participants and a 30 percent or more improvement of daytime sleepiness in 28.1 percent of participants. Findings correlated with improvement in disability and depression and revealed associations with sleep and both pain and depression. Results will help clinicians gain a better understanding of the type of patient most likely to benefit from this treatment.

Financial toxicity after robotic prostate cancer surgery: Younger patients are at higher risk

Among men undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for treatment of prostate cancer, younger patients are more likely to experience cancer-related financial toxicity, suggests a study in The Journal of Urology®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

CU Social Innovation Hub – Driving Social Science Research towards Social Innovation, Raising the Community’s Quality of Life, Meeting Social Needs

Chula reveals the success of CU SiHub as an incubator for faculty members, researchers, and students to drive research in the social sciences, arts and humanities to create social innovation businesses and social enterprises toward a sustainable society.

Chula’s Innovations for the Aging Society

As one of the countries with a rapidly increasing aging population, especially this 2022, Thailand is now becoming an ‘aging’ society and will likely become a ‘super-aging society’ by 2031. To better meet the needs and provide services to the nation’s aging society, experts from various fields at Chulalongkorn University have conducted research to produce and develop innovations for the elderly.

Chula Dementia Day Center Can Help You Prepare for Old Age with a Clear Mind and Away from Alzheimer’s

Dementia Day Center, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, the Thai Red Cross Society prepares for Thailand’s anticipated aging society by offering various rehabilitation services to help slow down the decline of people with dementia, while planning to launch a professional course for caregivers, and establishing the “Bright Brain Club” to persuade people of all ages to learn and care for early brain health to avoid the possibility Alzheimer’s disease.

Healing trauma: Research links PTSD, emotion regulation and quality of life

Research from Binghamton University, State University of New York provides insight into the impact PTSD has on emotional regulation and quality of life, and points to ways to improve both.

UCLA research finds the US lags 79 other nations in preventing child immigration detention

The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified calls to end the detention of migrant children, as cases surge among children held in crowded conditions; yet immigration detention’s threats to children’s fundamental rights did not begin with the current public health crisis. Unlike…

Women with recurrent UTIs voice ‘fear and frustration’ over treatment options

Women with recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) experience frustration related to their treatment – particularly the risks from repeated use of antibiotics, according to a focus group study in The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Vertical greenery can act as a stress buffer, NTU Singapore study finds

Vertical greenery ‘planted’ on the exterior of buildings may help to buffer people against stress, a Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) study has found. The benefits of nature on mental health and for wellbeing have long been recognised, and…

Study is first to show that air pollutants increase risk of painful periods for women

Dysmenorrhea, that is, frequent severe and painful cramps during menstruation from abnormal contractions of the uterus, is the most common of all gynecological disorders. It affects between 16-91% of girls and women of reproductive age, of whom 2%-29% have symptoms…

Using computation to improve words: Novel tool could improve serious illness conversations

Conversations between seriously ill people, their families and palliative care specialists lead to better quality-of-life. Understanding what happens during these conversations – and particularly how they vary by cultural, clinical, and situational contexts – is essential to guide healthcare communication…

Finding pathways for sustainable development in Africa

A new project funded under the Belmont Forum’s joint Collaborative Research Action on Pathways to Sustainability will develop novel tools and capacities to understand and manage interlinkages between the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and support sustainable development pathways for African…

Study: A quarter of adults don’t want children — and they’re still happy

Parenting is one of life’s greatest joys, right? Not for everyone. New research from Michigan State University psychologists examines characteristics and satisfaction of adults who don’t want children. As more people acknowledge they simply don’t want to have kids, Jennifer…

Mains to Rains website promotes steps towards sustainable gardening

Researchers at Cranfield University have worked with colleagues at the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) to launch a new website aimed at saving water in the garden. Gardeners visiting the Mains to Rains website can pledge to reduce their dependence on…

Gaps to fill: Income, education may impact inequalities in seeking dental care

University of Tsukuba study finds urgent and substantial dental care have small regional inequalities in Japan, while periodontal care and outreach services are largest; income, education levels also may negatively affect dental care utilization

Association of Medicare Advantage star ratings with disparities in quality of care

What The Study Did: Researchers examined the associations between Medicare Advantage star ratings, which are created using data from all enrollees in a plan, and disparities in care for racial/ethnic minorities and enrollees with lower income and less education. Authors:…