Healing trauma: Research links PTSD, emotion regulation and quality of life

Research from Binghamton University, State University of New York provides insight into the impact PTSD has on emotional regulation and quality of life, and points to ways to improve both.

UCLA research finds the US lags 79 other nations in preventing child immigration detention

The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified calls to end the detention of migrant children, as cases surge among children held in crowded conditions; yet immigration detention’s threats to children’s fundamental rights did not begin with the current public health crisis. Unlike…

Women with recurrent UTIs voice ‘fear and frustration’ over treatment options

Women with recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) experience frustration related to their treatment – particularly the risks from repeated use of antibiotics, according to a focus group study in The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Study is first to show that air pollutants increase risk of painful periods for women

Dysmenorrhea, that is, frequent severe and painful cramps during menstruation from abnormal contractions of the uterus, is the most common of all gynecological disorders. It affects between 16-91% of girls and women of reproductive age, of whom 2%-29% have symptoms…

Vertical greenery can act as a stress buffer, NTU Singapore study finds

Vertical greenery ‘planted’ on the exterior of buildings may help to buffer people against stress, a Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) study has found. The benefits of nature on mental health and for wellbeing have long been recognised, and…

Using computation to improve words: Novel tool could improve serious illness conversations

Conversations between seriously ill people, their families and palliative care specialists lead to better quality-of-life. Understanding what happens during these conversations – and particularly how they vary by cultural, clinical, and situational contexts – is essential to guide healthcare communication…

Finding pathways for sustainable development in Africa

A new project funded under the Belmont Forum’s joint Collaborative Research Action on Pathways to Sustainability will develop novel tools and capacities to understand and manage interlinkages between the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and support sustainable development pathways for African…

Study: A quarter of adults don’t want children — and they’re still happy

Parenting is one of life’s greatest joys, right? Not for everyone. New research from Michigan State University psychologists examines characteristics and satisfaction of adults who don’t want children. As more people acknowledge they simply don’t want to have kids, Jennifer…

Mains to Rains website promotes steps towards sustainable gardening

Researchers at Cranfield University have worked with colleagues at the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) to launch a new website aimed at saving water in the garden. Gardeners visiting the Mains to Rains website can pledge to reduce their dependence on…

Gaps to fill: Income, education may impact inequalities in seeking dental care

University of Tsukuba study finds urgent and substantial dental care have small regional inequalities in Japan, while periodontal care and outreach services are largest; income, education levels also may negatively affect dental care utilization

Association of Medicare Advantage star ratings with disparities in quality of care

What The Study Did: Researchers examined the associations between Medicare Advantage star ratings, which are created using data from all enrollees in a plan, and disparities in care for racial/ethnic minorities and enrollees with lower income and less education. Authors:…

Personalized Soundscape Could Help People with Dementia with Time, Place Recognition

Designing a soundscape to improve quality of life for an individual is centered on putting their perception at the heart of the process. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Arezoo Talebzadeh from Ghent University will show how a personalized soundscape can help those with dementia by providing clues regarding time of day and place. The session, “Soundscape design for people with dementia; the correlation between psychoacoustic parameter and human perception,” will take place Wednesday, June 9.

Report calls for ‘comprehensive action’ to tackle poverty in UK city

Rising unemployment, inadequate benefits and low paid work are the main causes of poverty and destitution in Stoke-on-Trent according to the findings of a new study. The research carried out by Staffordshire University and Citizens Advice Staffordshire North & Stoke-on-Trent,…

Climate warming to increase carbon loss in Canadian peatland by 103 per cent

Carbon loss in Canadian peatland is projected to increase by 103 per cent under a high emission scenario, according to new research led by scientists from the University of Waterloo. The results of the study, which was published today in…

Cultural, belief system data can inform gray wolf recovery efforts in US

Humans regularly exert a powerful influence on the survival and persistence of species, yet social-science information is used only sporadically in conservation decisions. Researchers at Colorado State University and The Ohio State University have created an index depicting the mix…

Older Canadians say they’re more willing to get the flu shot in the wake of COVID-19

The pandemic has increased older adults’ willingness to receive the flu shot, new research shows. The study analyzed survey results of 4,501 Canadians over the age of 50 from ten provinces. Twenty per cent of 1,001 research participants aged 50…

How international students make decisions about staying in Canada

While some international students come to Canada knowing whether they intend to stay or return home after completing their degrees, the majority decide after they have had a chance to live here for a few years, a new study has…