Study: Young workers now value respect over ‘fun’ perks in the workplace

Researchers at University of Missouri and Kansas State University discovered having respectful communication outweighs ‘fun’ work perks when attracting and retaining young workers

How experiencing diverse emotions impacts students

Experiencing a variety of positive emotions–or emodiversity–may benefit high school students, according to a study published in the British Journal of Educational Psychology . Positive emodiversity was associated with greater engagement (which has cognitive, behavioral, and emotional components) and academic…

New research shows link between politics, boredom and breaking public-health rules

People who are more prone to boredom and who are socially conservative are more likely to break public-health rules, according to new psychology research. While previous research demonstrated a connection between being highly prone to boredom and breaking social-distancing rules,…

Study shows how rudeness leads to anchoring, including in medical diagnoses

Have you ever been cut off in traffic by another driver, leaving you still seething miles later? Or been interrupted by a colleague in a meeting, and found yourself replaying the event in your head even after you’ve left work…

Experiment evaluates the effect of human decisions on climate reconstructions

The first double-blind experiment analysing the role of human decision-making in climate reconstructions has found that it can lead to substantially different results. The experiment, designed and run by researchers from the University of Cambridge, had multiple research groups from…

Not fear, but goal importance and others’ behavior makes you favour COVID-19 measures

While earlier research has mostly looked into factors such as fear, perceived risk, age and political views to determine what makes individuals and societies more or less willing to drastically change their lifestyle and support government-imposed strict restrictions, in order…

Study: Don’t count on caffeine to fight sleep deprivation

Rough night of sleep? Relying on caffeine to get you through the day isn’t always the answer, says a new study from Michigan State University. Researchers from MSU’s Sleep and Learning Lab, led by psychology associate professor Kimberly Fenn, assessed…

Survey measures health care delays during pandemic’s beginning

At the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, a University of Illinois Chicago researcher conducted a survey asking respondents if they experienced health care delays because of the pandemic. In addition to learning about the types of delays, the study also presented a unique opportunity to capture a historic moment at the…

How international students make decisions about staying in Canada

While some international students come to Canada knowing whether they intend to stay or return home after completing their degrees, the majority decide after they have had a chance to live here for a few years, a new study has…

NYITCOM researcher secures NIH grant to study impact of stress on clinical depression

A researcher at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) has secured a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how certain brain cells respond to chronic stress. The project is estimated to receive…

A new theory for what’s happening in the brain when something looks familiar

This novel concept from University of Pennsylvania neuroscientist Nicole Rust brings the field one step closer to understanding how memory functions. Long-term, it could have implications for treating memory-impairing diseases like Alzheimer’s

What happens in the brain when we imagine the future?

Research from University of Pennsylvania neuroscientist Joseph Kable finds that two sub-networks are at work, one focused on creating the new event, another on evaluating whether that event is positive or negative

Training in compassion improves the well-being of relatives to people with mental illness

If relatives of people with mental illness become better at accepting the difficult emotions and life events they experience — which is what training in compassion is about — their anxiety, depression and stress is reduced

The color red influences investor behavior, financial research reveals

LAWRENCE, KANSAS — The phrase “to see red” means to become angry. But for investors, seeing red takes on a whole different meaning. William BazleyThat’s the premise behind a new article by William Bazley, assistant professor of finance at the…