UAlbany Experts Available to Discuss Active 2021 Hurricane Season

ALBANY, N.Y. (Sept. 8, 2021) – As we hit mid-September, many experts in the atmospheric science community, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, are proving to be right on their predictions of an active 2021 Atlantic hurricane season. Already,…

Safety experts offer tips to prepare for potentially dangerous hurricane season

Summer is just around the corner, and so is hurricane season. Weather experts are warning Americans to prepare for an active and potentially dangerous Atlantic season – which gets its official start on June 1. With the potential for heavy rain and strong winds, the threat of power loss, and dealing with potentially dangerous cleanup in the aftermath of a storm, experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) say preparing in advance is the best way to weather anything hurricane season may bring.

FSU experts available to comment for 2021 hurricane season

By: Bill Wellock | Published: April 20, 2021 | 3:15 pm | SHARE: Florida State University faculty are among the world leaders in the study of hurricanes.From forecasting to insurance to ecological aftermath, FSU experts are available to discuss the many ways these storms impact people, property and the environment.These faculty members are available to answer media questions and provide perspective for news stories throughout the 2021 hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through Nov.

Vulnerable Populations: How Will They Cope and Adapt This Hurricane Season?

Researchers will study areas that include counties in south and central Florida and the Panhandle, which are still recovering from Hurricanes Michael and Irma, and which saw an influx of displaced individuals from Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. They will examine resilience of individuals and households, including their coping and adaptive capacities during a busy hurricane season in the midst of pandemic. The research will advance knowledge on several topics related to housing, health and hazards.

Novel Measurement and Forecasting Systems Make ‘Weathering the Storm’ More Precise

In the last several decades, more than half of the deaths associated with tropical cyclones in the U.S. were due to inland flooding. Unfortunately, current forecasting capabilities are limited. Researchers are developing a warning system for more accurate and timely detection and forecasting of inland and coastal floods, under a variety of precipitation regimes. The technology will enable local and state governments to more effectively plan and respond to tropical storms.