MD Anderson Research Highlights for July 27, 2022

Clinical advances include treating hematologic cancers with effective targeted therapies, circulating tumor DNA as a biomarker for recurrence with colorectal liver metastases, and using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to guide surgical decisions for patients with lateral pelvic lymph node metastases in rectal cancer. Laboratory findings offer new understanding of the pancreatic cancer immune microenvironment, melanoma cell states, TP53 mutation status in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and potential targets for metastatic prostate cancer and GNAS-mutant colorectal cancer.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Receives Highly Competitive NCI SPORE Grant for Leukemia Research with a Focus on Acute Myeloid Leukemia

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recently awarded Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) with a prestigious Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant for leukemia research. The Translational Research Program (TRP) is the home of the SPOREs — a cornerstone of NCI’s efforts to promote collaborative, interdisciplinary translational cancer research.

New drug combination shows promise as powerful treatment for AML

Scientists have identified two drugs that are potent against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) when combined, but only weakly effective when used alone. The researchers were able to significantly enhance cancer cell death by jointly administering the drugs that are only partially effective when used as single-agent therapies.

Cardioprotective Drug Prevents Severe Cardiac Events in Children Undergoing Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

The cardioprotective drug dexrazoxane preserved cardiac function in pediatric patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) without compromising overall patient survival and potentially improving it, according to a new study by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The results suggest dexrazoxane should be considered for cardioprotection in all pediatric patients undergoing standard chemotherapy for AML.

Small Mutations Identified through Deep DNA Sequencing for AML and MDS

Deep DNA sequencing analysis conducted by Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey investigators examining genomic differences within tumors for prediction of disease relapse in certain hematologic malignancies has identified small mutations. These may help further guide treatment decision making for patients.