New discoveries reveal how acute myeloid leukemia walks a fine line between growth and cell death

Researchers revealed new insights into how acute myeloid leukemia (AML) develops and progresses, according to a study published in Molecular Cell on July 20, 2021. They describe a mechanism by which AML cells regulate a cancer-related protein, mutant IDH2, to increase the buildup of blood cancer cells—a distinguishing characteristic of the disease.

Promising role for whole genome sequencing in guiding blood cancer treatment

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that whole genome sequencing is at least as accurate and often better than conventional genetic tests that help determine the treatment for a patient’s blood cancer. Genome sequencing technology continuously is decreasing in cost and recently reached a level similar to that of conventional testing.

Mount Sinai-Led Team Builds First Model of the Progression of Acute Myeloid Leukemia using CRISPR

A research team led by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Icahn Mount Sinai) has built the first cellular model to depict the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), from its early to late stages. By using gene editing technologies to alter genes that make cells malignant, the team was able to identify potential therapeutic targets for early disease stages. The study was reported in the journal Cell Stem Cell in February.

New drug combination shows promise as powerful treatment for AML

Scientists have identified two drugs that are potent against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) when combined, but only weakly effective when used alone. The researchers were able to significantly enhance cancer cell death by jointly administering the drugs that are only partially effective when used as single-agent therapies.

Young survivors of acute myeloid leukemia have long-term complications from treatment

Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a high risk of developing several long-term health complications after treatment, a study led by UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers has found. The most common complications were cardiovascular, endocrine and respiratory diseases. The complications – known as late effects – were more present among non-white AYA patients and those living in more deprived neighborhoods.

T Cell Therapy, Gut Microbiome, Tumorigenicity, and More Featured in September 2020 Toxicological Sciences

Toxicological Sciences features leading research in toxicology in the areas of biomarkers, environmental toxicology, and more in the September 2020 issue.

Leading Cancer Treatment Recommendations from NCCN Now Available in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish

NCCN Guidelines, containing expert recommendations for cancer care, are available in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish can all be accessed for free at NCCN.org/global or via the free Virtual Library of NCCN Guidelines® App

Combination therapy well-tolerated and highly effective for patients with IDH1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

A combination therapy of ivosenidib (IVO) plus venetoclax (VEN) with or without azacitidine (AZA) was found to be effective against a specific genetic subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a Phase Ib/II trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The results of this trial may support a novel course of action for patients with AML harboring an IDH1 mutation who have historically had few treatment options.

Cardioprotective Drug Prevents Severe Cardiac Events in Children Undergoing Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

The cardioprotective drug dexrazoxane preserved cardiac function in pediatric patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) without compromising overall patient survival and potentially improving it, according to a new study by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The results suggest dexrazoxane should be considered for cardioprotection in all pediatric patients undergoing standard chemotherapy for AML.

ASH: Research revises classification of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

Results from a study conducted by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Munich Leukemia Laboratory were presented today as a late-breaking abstract at the American Society of Hematology annual meeting. The study integrates genomic and transcriptomic sequencing to provide the most detailed classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to date.