Study Finds Link Between Dropping Permit Requirement for Carrying Concealed Weapons and Increase in Officer-Involved Shootings with Civilian Victims

The study examined the impact of changes to state laws for civilians carrying concealed firearms and, using statistical modeling, estimated what would have happened if the laws had not changed.

New Report Highlights U.S. 2020 Gun-Related Deaths: Highest Number Ever Recorded By CDC, Gun Homicides Increase By More Than One-Third

A new report from the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence Solutions analyzes Centers for Disease Control and Prevention firearm fatality data for 2020—a year that saw the highest number of gun-related deaths ever recorded by the CDC and a sharp increase in gun homicides.

Johns Hopkins to Host Virtual Fireside Chat with USAID Assistant Administrator for Global Health Atul Gawande

Johns Hopkins will welcome Atul Gawande, assistant administrator of the Bureau for Global Health at the United States Agency for International Development, for a virtual conversation with Ellen J. MacKenzie, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Admiral Rachel Levine From HHS, Govs. Cooper, Evers, Lujan-Grisham, Whitmer, and Wolf Added as Featured Speakers at The Bloomberg American Health Summit

The Summit, hosted by the Bloomberg American Health Initiative at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, will bring together innovators and policymakers from around the country who are working in the Initiative’s five focus areas: addiction and overdose, environmental challenges, obesity and the food system, adolescent health, and violence.

Johns Hopkins Cancer Researcher Ashani Weeraratna Appointed To National Cancer Advisory Board By President Biden

Johns Hopkins scientist Ashani Weeraratna, PhD, a leading cancer researcher who specializes in melanoma and the effects of aging on cancer, has been appointed by President Joe Biden to serve as a member of the National Cancer Advisory Board.

Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy at Bloomberg School of Public Health Co-Hosts Panel on Road Safety, Tuesday, May 11 at 2 PM EDT

The Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is co-hosting an online panel discussion at 2 p.m., Tuesday, May 11, EDT, with the Institute of Transportation Engineers.

New Johns Hopkins Center for Research on COVID-19 Immunity

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have been jointly awarded a major grant from the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, to set up a center for research on the human serological immune response to SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Associate Professor Craig Pollack Named Inaugural Endowed Chair at the Johns Hopkins Schools of Nursing and Public Health

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health announce the appointment of Craig Pollack, MD, MHS, as inaugural chair of the Katey Ayres Endowed Professorship.Funded through a generous gift from JHSON Class of 1967 Alumna Katey Ayres—and matched by the Maryland E-Nnovation Initiative Fund—the professorship will tackle the complex intersection of housing and social services and their impact on health.

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Launches a Dual DNP/MPH Degree with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health announce the launch of a dual-degree Doctor of Nursing Practice Executive/Master of Public Health (DNP/MPH) program to prepare students at the highest level of advanced practice nursing and public health leadership.

Nearly One-Third of Primary Care Providers Do Not View Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder as Effective

A new survey of U.S. primary care physicians from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that nearly one-third, 32.9 percent, do not think treating opioid use disorder with medication is any more effective than treatment without medication.

Infants Introduced Early to Solid Foods Show Gut Bacteria Changes that May Portend Future Health Risks

Infants who were started on solid foods at or before three months of age showed changes in the levels of gut bacteria and bacterial byproducts, called short-chain fatty acids, measured in their stool samples, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

U.S. Autism Rates Up 10 Percent in New CDC Report

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health contributed to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that finds the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among 11 surveillance sites as 1 in 54 among children aged 8 years in 2016 (or 1.85 percent).

Survey Data Confirm Increases in Anxiety, Depression, Suicidal Thinking Among U.S. Adolescents Seeking Mental Health Care

Nationwide survey data on more than 230,000 U.S. adolescents over the period 2005 to 2018 suggest that anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts, and other “internalizing” problems account for an increasing share of the adolescent mental health burden, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Columbia University.

Firearm Purchaser Licensing Laws Linked To Fewer Fatal Mass Shootings

Firearm purchaser licensing laws that require an in-person application or fingerprinting are associated with an estimated 56 percent fewer fatal mass shootings in states that have them, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Political TV Ads Referencing Guns Increased Eightfold Over Four Election Cycles

The number of political candidate television advertisements that refer to guns increased significantly across four election cycles in U.S. media markets, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The study, to be published in the February issue of Health Affairs, analyzed more than 14 million televised campaign advertisements that aired for candidates running for president, U.S. Congress, governor, and state legislatures in 210 U.S. media markets over four election cycles in 2012, 2014, 2016, and 2018. The researchers found that the number of political ads aired that referenced guns increased by 369,600, an eightfold increase from one percent of candidate-related television political ads aired in 2012 to 8 percent in 2018.

Among the televised political ads aired that referenced guns, the share with gun regulation-oriented messages that were focused on reducing gun violence increased almost threefold over time–from 10 perce

Young Children Receiving Housing Vouchers Had Lower Hospital Spending Into Adulthood

Young children whose household received a housing voucher were admitted to the hospital fewer times and incurred lower hospital costs in the subsequent two decades than children whose households did not receive housing vouchers, according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.