Many types of leisure time activities may lower risk of death for older adults

Older adults who participate weekly in many different types of leisure time activities, such as walking for exercise, jogging, swimming laps, or playing tennis, may have a lower risk of death from any cause, as well as death from cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a new study led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.

“One-size-fits-all” flawed for assessing cardiovascular disease risk among Asian Americans

In a large, retrospective study covering data from the last two decades, death rates for cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. varied among people from various Asian ethnicity subgroups, with death rate trends that stagnated in some subgroups and increased in others, according to new research published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.

Study: Death Rate from Parkinson’s Rising in U.S.

A new study shows that in the last two decades the death rate from Parkinson’s disease has risen about 63% in the United States. The research is published in the October 27, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that the death rate was twice as high in men as in women, and there was a higher death rate in white people than other racial/ethnic groups.

Public health expert: COVID-19 pandemic highlighting health care disparities in U.S. system

The COVID-19 pandemic opened a Pandora’s box of inequalities in the U.S., highlighting the widespread disparities in health care and social injustice. Black and Hispanic communities have experienced a disproportionately large number of COVID-19 related deaths; this is especially true…

NAU professors examine the role racial disparities play in mortality rates of rural, urban residents

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers collected nationally representative data from 3,131 U.S. counties between 1968-2016, and looked at historical trends in death rates between older black and white adults living in different communities.