American College of Physicians recommends cognitive behavioral therapy or second-generation antidepressants for adults with major depressive disorder

The American College of Physicians (ACP) has issued an update of its guideline with clinical recommendations for nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments of adults in the acute phase of major depressive disorder (MDD). In the updated clinical guideline, ACP recommends the use of either cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or second-generation antidepressants (SGAs) as initial treatment in adults with moderate to severe MDD, and suggests the combination of both, as an alternate initial treatment option. The guideline and supporting evidence reviews are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Engineering Research Provides Non-Invasive Solutions for Diagnosing and Treating Neurological and Psychiatric Conditions

Could artificial intelligence help solve the mental health crisis? What if an algorithm allowed neurologists to know the area affected by a brain seizure?    These are just a few of the questions that Maryam Ravan, Ph.D., assistant professor of electrical and…

Mount Sinai Launches the Brain and Body Research Center, Among the First in the U.S.to Focus Solely on How the Brain and Body Interact

Have you ever experienced a stressful time in your life and then caught a cold, or wondered why you feel sad and depressed when you’re sick? It turns out that it’s not all in your head.

Recent research spanning the fields of neuroscience and immunology suggests that when the brain senses a threat in the environment—whether it be physical, psychological, or social—it sends signals via a complex network of peripheral nerves that mobilize the immune system, readying it to protect us from injury.

Children with social anxiety, maternal history of depression more likely to develop depression

Although researchers have known for decades that depression runs in families, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, suggests that children suffering from social anxiety may be at particular risk for depression in the future.

Mental Health Care Needed More Than Ever During COVID-19 Pandemic — Telehealth Can Help Make it Happen

Live video telehealth services are a critical component of the COVID-19 response. Offered by physicians, other clinicians and health-care organizations, telehealth provides a useful method for starting and continuing essential mental health treatment without risk of spreading infection.