There’s a Better Way to Detect High-Risk Medications in Older Adults with Cancer According to New Study in JNCCN

Gerontology researchers teamed up with hematologic-oncology investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute to look at the association between older patients with blood cancers who were taking multiple medications and their corresponding frailty. They also created a new scale based on a list of Potentially Inappropriate Medications (PIMs) from the NCCN Guidelines® for Older Adult Oncology—called the Geriatric Oncology-Potentially Inappropriate Medications (GO-PIMs) Scale—and found it to be more effective at predicting frailty than conventional methods.

María de los Ángeles Ortega to Lead Nursing Clinical Care for Vulnerable Populations

Dr. Ortega’s newest role as associate dean of clinical practice now places her at the helm of clinical care for both the Green Memory and Wellness Center and the FAU and Northwest Community Health Alliance’s Community Health Center (FAU/NCHA CHC), operated by the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing. She will collaborate with FAU/NCHA CHC executive director Karethy Edwards, Dr.PH, APRN, professor and associate dean for academic programs; and clinical director Desiree’ T. Weems, APRN, a certified nurse practitioner.

The power of vitamin D: What experts already know (and are still learning) about the ‘sunshine vitamin’

It’s no secret that vitamin D is critical to balancing many areas of health. But from pediatric broken bones to cluster headaches, physicians and scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston) are still learning just how powerful the so-called “sunshine vitamin” is.

Low-dose Aspirin No Longer Recommended to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

New draft recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend against taking aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes for most people. The Oct. 12, 2021 guidelines are based on new evidence showing that the risks of daily low-dose…

Rush University Medical Center Again on U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll

Of the more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals evaluated, Rush University Medical Center ranked No. 19 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, with nine of specialties rated among the country’s very best.

6 Simple Steps Physician Anesthesiologists Can Lead on to Reduce Older Adults’ Risk of Surgery-related Delirium

A new paper defines the key practical steps that can be taken before, during, and after surgery to reduce patients’ risk of developing delirium and related problems that have long-term implications for brain health. Due to their unique role in perioperative care, physician anesthesiologists are ideally suited to lead multidisciplinary teams to implement these recommendations devoted to ensuring safety for all patients.

Mount Sinai Health System Receives Waiver From Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to Scale Up Hospitalization at Home

The U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced today that the agency had approved a waiver allowing Mount Sinai Health System to enroll a broader group of Medicare patients into its Hospitalization at Home (HaH) program. The move is a game changer as hospitals in New York City brace for a continued increase in COVID-19 cases.

Rush Receives $3.5 Million in Funding to Address Behavioral Health Disparities in Older Adults

As the Rush Center for Excellence in Aging continues its commitment to improving the health of older adults, others are taking notice. Rush was designated a Center of Excellence Behavioral Health Disparities in Older Adults by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Rush System Leads The Way in Age-Friendly Care

After Rush University Medical Center was designated as an Age-Friendly Health System, the American Hospital Association developed a case study that took a deep dive into the Rush Center for Excellence in Aging and its successful impact on older adult health care.