Making Communication Clearer During COVID-19

Realizing that wearing a mask can make communication harder for people with hearing loss, Rush University Medical Center is now offering transparent face masks. These clear masks can help ease stressful situations and it make it less likely for information to be misinterpreted.

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Translational Hearing Center awarded largest NIH grant in Creighton University history

Researchers will be dedicated to battling hearing loss resulting from numerous causes. They will tackle hearing loss in children whose hearing is compromised by antibiotics or other medical treatments, to persons suffering hearing loss in the wake of cancer therapies, those who suffer deafness due to such infections as meningitis, through to natural hearing loss caused by aging.

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Most older adults haven’t gotten checked for hearing loss, with women less likely than men to be screened or tested

Eighty percent of Americans over 50 say their primary care doctor hasn’t asked about their hearing in the past two years, and nearly as many haven’t had their hearing checked by a professional in that same time, according to a new national poll report.

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Woman Regains Hearing in Left Ear After 50 Years Thanks to Innovative Implant

DETROIT (December 23, 2020) – This holiday season, Angela Holland will enjoy the gift of hearing from her left ear again. After 50 years of single-sided deafness caused by a disease known as cholesteatoma, new hearing technology implanted by Henry Ford Health System surgeon Kristen Angster, M.D. will allow Holland to ring in the season and truly enjoy the sounds of the holidays.

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Mass Eye and Ear Capital Campaign Concludes with $252 Million Raised to Advance Research and Patient Care

Mass Eye and Ear is proud to announce the successful conclusion of its historic campaign, “Bold Science. Life-Changing Cures.” which raised $252M from philanthropy to advance research to treat and cure diseases of vision, hearing, and the head and neck.
The campaign was led by co-chair Wyc Grousbeck, Boston Celtics CEO and Lead Owner and former Chairman of Mass Eye and Ear.

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Dr. Thomas Balkany Receives First Noel L. Cohen Award from the American Neurotology Society

Thomas Balkany, M.D., Hotchkiss professor and chair emeritus of the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, is the first recipient of the annual Noel L. Cohen Award from the American Neurotology Society (ANS). Dr. Balkany was recognized during ANS’s Annual Meeting on September 11.

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Cochlear implants should be recommended for adults more often

An international group of hearing specialists has released a new set of recommendations emphasizing that cochlear implants should be offered to adults who have moderate to severe or worse hearing loss much more often than is the current practice. The group hopes the recommendations help increase usage of such devices, potentially improving hearing and quality of life for millions worldwide.

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Hearing loss linked to neurocognitive deficits in childhood cancer survivors

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are studying how hearing loss can affect the neurocognitive abilities of childhood cancer survivors. Findings show that survivors with severe hearing loss are at a significant increased risk for neurocognitive deficits, independent of what type of therapy they receive.

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Study uncovers hair cell loss as underlying cause of age-related hearing loss

In a new study of human ear tissues, hearing scientists have demonstrated that age-related hearing loss, also called presbycusis, is mainly caused by damage to hair cells, the sensory cells in the inner ear that transform sound-induced vibrations into the electrical signals that are relayed to the brain by the auditory nerve. Their research challenges the prevailing view of the last 60 years that age-related hearing loss is mainly driven by damage to the stria vascularis, the cellular “battery” that powers the hair cell’s mechanical-to-electrical signal conversion.

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Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

Sharon Tapp, who worked as a nurse case manager at Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington, D.C., started experiencing sudden body weakness, chest pain, a high temperature and headache on March 18. Concerned, she went to her local urgent care center to find out what was wrong. They told her that these symptoms were flu-like, tested her for the coronavirus and told her to quarantine for 14 days. After five days and no difference in the presentation of her symptoms, the urgent care team contacted Sharon, letting her know that she tested positive for coronavirus and recommending that she go to the emergency department. Sharon’s family took her to Johns Hopkins Medicine’s Suburban Hospital. Because her condition worsened while at Suburban, she was transferred to The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore within 10 days of being admitted to Suburban Hospital.

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Biomarkers of Brain Function May Lead to Clinical Tests for Hidden Hearing Loss

A pair of biomarkers of brain function — one that represents “listening effort,” and another that measures ability to process rapid changes in frequencies — may help to explain why a person with normal hearing may struggle to follow conversations in noisy environments, according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers. The researchers hoped the study could inform the design of next-generation clinical testing for hidden hearing loss, a condition that cannot currently be measured using standard hearing exams.

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