Should You Take Your Child to the Emergency Room, Urgent Care—or Call the Doctor?

As a parent, your number one goal is keeping your child safe and healthy. When is it time to head to the emergency department (ED)—and when is it best to call your child’s doctor, or go to an urgent care center?

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Lawnmower Injuries Remain Prevalent for Children Despite Increased Awareness

As people head outside to mow their lawns this spring and summer, children continue to remain at risk for serious injuries and death associated with lawnmowers. A new review article published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS) analyzed 13 years of lawnmower injuries in children across the United States, identifying disparities that exist in national and geographic incidence rates and injury characteristics. Children in rural areas not only experienced a higher rate of lawnmower injuries, but had an increased rate of infections, amputations, inpatient stays and surgical complications.

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CHOP Study Demonstrates How to Collect True Impact Incidents from Head Impact Sensors in Youth Sports

An increased awareness of concussion risks in young athletes has prompted researchers to use a variety of head impact sensors to measure frequency and severity of impacts during sports. A new study from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) shows these head sensors can record a large number of false positive impacts during real game play. The CHOP team’s study emphasizes that an extra step to video-confirm the sensor data is essential for research and for use of this data in injury prevention strategies for player safety.

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Baylor Scott & White Health Opens New Sports and Orthopedic Center in Waco

Baylor Scott & White Health opened a new facility designed to promote the community’s health while advancing sports medicine and injury prevention across the region.

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Research on firearm injuries to U.S. children gets 30 times less funding per death than other causes

Firearm injuries kill 2,500 American children each year. But the nation spends far less on studying what led to these injuries, and what might prevent and treat them, than it spends on other causes of death in children. In fact, on a per-death basis, funding for pediatric firearm research is 30 times lower than it would have to be to keep pace with research on other child health threats.

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