George Washington University Public Health/Medical Experts Available for Media Interviews on the COVID-19 Pandemic

Public health experts predict the United States may be headed for thousands of new COVID-19 cases and deaths this winter,

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Low Ratings of Workplace Safety Climate by Hospital Nurses Linked to Higher Risk of Injury

Compared to other groups of healthcare practitioners, nurses may have the poorest perceptions of workplace safety climate and the highest rates of injuries and sick time, suggests a single-hospital study in the May/June issue of the Journal of Healthcare Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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@umichsph expert offers 5 steps employers, employees need to take to reopen businesses #coronavirus

ANN ARBOR—Businesses across the nation are preparing to start reopening their workplaces. Rick Neitzel, an expert on occupational and environmental health at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, outlines five steps that employers and employees can take together to return to work in the safest manner possible.

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Ultraviolet Light Exposes Contagion Spread from Improper PPE Use

Despite PPE use, reports show that many health care workers contracted COVID-19. A novel training technique reinforces the importance of using proper procedures to put on and take off PPE when caring for patients during the pandemic. Researchers vividly demonstrate how aerosol-generating procedures can lead to exposure of the contagion with improper PPE use. The most common error made by the health care workers was contaminating the face or forearms during PPE removal.

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Hazardous Drug Spills Put Cancer Nurses at Risk

While lifesaving to cancer patients, chemotherapy drugs can be hazardous for the health care workers who handle them, especially during a spill.

Inconsistent use of personal protective equipment when cleaning up a spill and problems with closed-system transfer devices — which are designed to prevent the release of toxic vapors and liquids — topped issues uncovered by a new safety study involving nearly 400 nurses across 12 academic infusion centers.

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